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BosNet Digest V5 #24 / Jan. 15, 1996

From: Parveez Syed

Bosnia-Herzegovina News Directory


CONTENTS

  • [01] REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT IN VIDEOTAPED MESSAGE TO THE PEOPLE OF BOSNIA

  • [02] ALKALAJ ON THE US INVESTMENT IN TUZLA

  • [03] MOSTAR AND SARAJEVO MUST REMAIN UNDIVIDED

  • [04] SMITH ON THE ARREST OF THE INDICTED WAR CRIMINALS

  • [05] SILAJDZIC ON RELATIONS IN B-H FEDERATION

  • [06] CONFERENCES IN ROME AND STOCKHOLM

  • [07] JAPANESE WILL NOT PARTICIPATE IN B-H MISSION

  • [08] MILOSEVIC CALL SERBS TO REMAIN IN SARAJEVO

  • [09] MUJAHIDIN LEFT B-H

  • [10] THREE SWEDISH SOLDIERS WOUNDED IN BOSNIA

  • [11] GREAT POW's EXCHANGE

  • [12] THE US TROOPS TOOK CONTROL OVER VIS

  • [13] RESOLUTION ON CROATIA PREPARED


  • [01] REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT IN VIDEOTAPED MESSAGE TO THE PEOPLE OF BOSNIA

    Friday 12 January 1996

    From: Parveez Syed

    Global Media Monitoring E-Mail INTERNET: PARVEEZ@CR78RA1UK.WIN-UK.NET

    THE PRESIDENT: To all the people of Bosnia, let me say I look forward to being with you tomorrow in a land where the waste of war is finally giving way to the promise of peace.

    As I visit with American peacekeeping forces stationed in Bosnia, I urge you to seize that promise, to turn the peace agreement signed one month ago from words into deeds. For nearly four years the war that tore Bosnia apart dramatized your differences.

    But for all that divides you, so much more unites you. Of course you are proud to be Muslims or Croats or Serbs. But all of you are also citizens of Bosnia, bound together by marriage and culture, by language and work, by shared love in a place you all call home. I believe that deep down you all want the same things: To live and raise your families without fear, to make a better life for your children. If these desires are ever to become reality, there must be peace.

    The United States and countries all around the world have sent you the men and women of our armed forces to help safeguard the peace so many of you have wanted for so long. Our troops are well prepared and heavily armed, but they come in peace. Their mission is to supervise the withdrawal of your armies behind the agreed separation line; to help assure that war does not break out again; to create a more secure climate throughout Bosnia so that you can rebuild your towns and roads, your factories and shops, your parks and playgrounds.

    We can help you do all these things, but we cannot guarantee that the people of Bosnia will come together and stay together as citizens, equal citizens, of a common land with a shared destiny. Only you can do that -- with the courage of an open mind and the generosity of an open heart.

    After so many lives lost and futures destroyed, I know that rebuilding a sense of community and trust may be the very hardest task you face. But you have a responsibility to try -- not because other nations want you to do it, not even because your leaders want you to do it. You must do that for yourselves, and especially for your children. It is said that every child is the chance for a new beginning. Now, this peace gives to all the children of Bosnia, and to all of their families, the chance for a new beginning. Seize this chance for peace. We don't have to imagine what the future will look like if you don't -- we have seen that in the sorrow and suffering you have endured already over the past four years.

    But just imagine the future if you do seize this moment, if you do rebuild your land and your lives together. For so much of your history you found strength in your diversity. Muslims, Croats and Serbs flourished side by side in Sarajevo, in Tuzla, in Mostar and throughout Bosnia. Some of you prayed in churches, some in mosques, some in synagogues. But you lived and worked together, building schools and libraries, trading goods and services, creating plays and music. You were neighbors and friends and families, and you can be again if you seize the best chance for peace you have had -- and what could be the last chance for peace you will have for a long, long time.

    I speak to you today on behalf of the American people, who know from our own experience the hard work it takes to forge a community from a nation of so many different groups. More than a century ago we fought a fierce civil war over race and slavery. Still today we struggle with the legacy of that war, and the challenge of our present make-up -- when we have so many races and religions and ethnic groups all over America. But we have learned that there are great benefits which come from finding common ground. Our nation is stronger and the lives of our people are more peaceful, more prosperous, more filled with hope when we bridge the valley of our differences to become a real community. Together with nations from all corners of the world, we have come here to Bosnia to help you do the same.

    So, people of Bosnia, you have ended your war, but now you must build your peace. I believe the greatest struggle you face is not among Muslims and Serbs and Croats; it is between those who embrace peace and those who reject it, those who look to the future and those who are blinded by the past, those who open their arms and those who still clench their fists. So each and every one of you must choose. You have seen the horror of war, you know the promise of peace. Choose peace.

    May God bless all the people of Bosnia.

    [02] ALKALAJ ON THE US INVESTMENT IN TUZLA

    Tuzla, Jan 15, 1996 (Press TWRA) - Bosnian ambassador to the USA, Sven Alkalaj who visited Tuzla during Bill Clinton's stay at that area told the journalists: "I have taken the opportunity, during the president Clinton's visit to Tuzla, to discuss the prospect for US economy investment in the region, which, as known, has great economy potentials. The fact that a number of the US troops are deployed here has arisen the interest of the US businessmen in this region. We have all conditions for such cooperation now: we have peace, some roads should be reopen to enable the economy in the area start working. The US government will be informed on the results of the talks. US businessmen are interested in this, but they have few information on capabilities of the economy here, due to the war and the war devastation." /end/ A.S.

    [03] MOSTAR AND SARAJEVO MUST REMAIN UNDIVIDED

    Mostar, Jan 14, 1996 (Press TWRA) - German foreign minister Klaus Kinkel visited Mostar today. Kinkel held a number of talks with top officials of the Republic and Federation of B-H and Croatia. Kinkel first talked with the EU administration high official in Mostar H. Koschnik and then foreign ministers of Croatia and B-H, Granic and Sacirbey, the president and vice president of the B-H Federation K.Zubak and E.Ganic, respectively and the mayors of the town's eastern part, Orucevic and western part, Brajkovic. At the press conference attended by all participants, Kinkel said:

    "Sarajevo and Mostar are and must remain the symbol of multiethnicity and all participants of today's talks agreed the Dayton agreement and the annex on Mostar must be implemented and Federation must operate unimpedingly. Entire freedom of movement must be secured in the town and the existing police forces, in accord with the agreement, must be unified. (..) Uncontrolled elements in Mostar jeopardizing the process of establishing Federation must be immediately prevented from realizing their intents.(..) All participants of today's talks know how important is the issue of the planned return of refugees. It is very important for Germany as we received 4OO,OOO refugees from ex-Yugoslav states, while the rest of European community admitted 2OO,OOO of them." Kinkel said that today's conclusion was for the report on the implementation of decisions reached today, to be submitted within two weeks. If the measures are not implemented as agreed, Koschnik will carry out arbitration procedure. "Nobody is forced to cooperate, but there is no argument for national leaders not to do so," replied H. Koschnik to the question if there would be any sanctions if the agreed was not complied with.

    A member of Bosnian presidency and vice-president of the B-H Federation E. Ganic confirmed, on behalf of the president Izetbegovic, readiness of Bosnian presidency for cooperation. "Generally speaking, relations between Bosniacs and Croats in Mostar are good. There are some problems on the ground and we have had enough of declarations so we should be settling particular problems," said Ganic. B-H foreign minister Sacirbey said it was important to "respect any life regardless of nationality," and that all participants took responsibility for all that would or would not be done.

    Koschnik today talked with the IFOR commander gen. L. Smith on the separation between civil and military duties in B-H. "Maintaining peace in the Balkans is IFOR's responsibility and peace in Mostar is that of EU administration. In accord with today's agreement, IFOR will engage liaison officers to establish relations with the EU administration. /end/ S.K.

    [04] SMITH ON THE ARREST OF THE INDICTED WAR CRIMINALS

    Seget Donji, Jan 15, 1996 (Press TWRA) - Adm. Leighton Smith visited a French-German field hospital at Siget Donji near Trogir on the Croatian Adriatic sea. Accompanied by the commander of the hospital Carl Pecher, Smith visited about fifty patients. Asked by journalists about the IFOR mandate to arrest war criminals, Karadzic and Mladic, Smith sid: "We are not explicitly authorized to search for and take them from B-H before the Hague Tribunal. But, I must say that I cannot speak absolutely accurately and frankly about the matter. At any case, it depends on the situation but I think that the governments of the nations whose members the indicted war criminals are, should alone brought them before the Hague Tribunal. I must repeat the IFOR is not mandated to search for them at the areas of its responsibility. /end/ A.S.

    [05] SILAJDZIC ON RELATIONS IN B-H FEDERATION

    Sarajevo, Jan 14,1996 (Press TWRA) - In an short interview for B- H Television last night, B-H Prime Minister H. Silajdzic expressed his concern over deterioration of relations in B-H Federation, provoked by the number of incidents which took place, lately. He emphasized that the latest incident on the Tesanj territory indicate that "something deep down is wrong". "When one enter B-H all the way to Mostar it seems that you are in one great Croatia, and not in Bosnia", said Silajdzic. Prime Minister Silajdzic emphasized that he personally would never consent to any kind of project for division of Mostar, and he invited EU Administrator over Mostar H. Koschnik to resign if he is not able to prevent that. (end)S.K.

    [06] CONFERENCES IN ROME AND STOCKHOLM

    Rome, Stockholm, Jan 15, 1996 (Press TWRA) - International conference on the minority protection is being held in Rome. Special accent is on the situation and prospects for minority rights in ex-Yugoslavia.

    12O experts met at the Stockholm conference on the supervision of multiparty elections in B-H. Addressing the participants, B-H foreign minister M. Sacirbey said it would be hard to prepare and secure adequate supervision of the elections as scheduled (9 months), if wanted to be "free & fair"./end/ A.S.

    [07] JAPANESE WILL NOT PARTICIPATE IN B-H MISSION

    Tokyo, Jan 14,1996 (Press TWRA) - Japan rejected the UN demand to participate with its policemen in the international police forces for B-H. "The situation on the ground", according to one anonymous japanese Foreign Ministry's official "is not stabilized and it is very hard to reach the unique view".

    UN sent such demand to the addresses of 5O countries members in order to secure the presence of 1721 policeman in B-H. Their task would be to train, establish and monitor the local police. This number still has not been reached. (end) S.K.

    [08] MILOSEVIC CALL SERBS TO REMAIN IN SARAJEVO

    Sarajevo, Jan 14,1996 (Press TWRA) - According to diplomatic sources Bosnian Serbs withdrew their threat that they will move from the parts of Sarajevo under their control and invited Carl Bildt, EU high Commissioner to demand the from Serbian population to the situation. This decision followed after the meeting between Bildt and Krajisnik, but it has been seen as temporary, and not permanent. on evacuation. TV Pale claim that about 7O OOO Serbs only waited for Krajisnik's signal to leave their homes and set them on fire rather than "to live under Muslim authorities" .

    Belgrade - Serbian President S. Milosevic invited, after the meeting with the Bosnian Serbs representative from Sarajevo M. Stanisic, Serbs to remain in the city. According to press release issued after the meeting Milosevic said that Dayton agreement guarantees the equal rights to all citizens and Serbs have to have confidence in international community, which has efficient mechanisms for the protection of the population. Milosevic emphasized that "FRY" will work on protection of all citizens of B-H. (end) S.K.

    [09] MUJAHIDIN LEFT B-H

    Zenica, Jan 14,1996 (Press TWRA) - The group of 25O foreign citizens who were members of unit "El Mujahid" which was part of B-H Army Forces, left Zenica. They were escorted by B-H Army forces on the direction Zenica-Travnik-Jajce-Bihac. (end) S.K.

    [10] THREE SWEDISH SOLDIERS WOUNDED IN BOSNIA

    Sarajevo, Jan 15, 1996 (Press TWRA) - A mine explosion wounded three Swedish soldiers, one seriously, while patrolling along the separation line 16 km far from Maglaj, said the IFOR spokesman, major Herve Gourmelon last night. A US vehicle, yesterday afternoon ran over a mine with no casualties. /end/ A.S.

    [11] GREAT POW's EXCHANGE

    Sarajevo, Jan 14, 1996 (Press TWRA) - POW's should be exchanged at four places in B-H tomorrow between the B-H army, HVO and Serb side. Exchange should take place at village of Bocac, south of Banjaluka and near Sanski Most, Gradacac and Gorazde. About 9OO POWs are expected to be exchanged. /end/ S.K.

    [12] THE US TROOPS TOOK CONTROL OVER VIS

    Sarajevo, Tuzla, Jan 15, 1996 (Press TWRA) - IFOR officials released that withdrawal of the parties to the conflict and IFOR deployment in B-H was going on as scheduled, without incidents.

    The US troops continued their deployment in the Tuzla region taking over the hill Vis between Kalesija and Sekovici, southeast of Tuzla, strategically important position in the region so far under Serb control. /end/ A.S.

    [13] RESOLUTION ON CROATIA PREPARED

    New York, Jan 15, 1996 (Press TWRA) - The UN Security Council is expected to adopt today the resolution on the peace operation in the eastern part and the furthest south of Croatia - the peninsula of Prevlaka. In the Croatian areas, Serb-occupied since 1991, (Baranja, eastern Slavonia, western Srijem) the UN decided to deploy its peace keeping forces called UN Transitional Administration for Eastern Slavonia (UNTAES). This is the third formation of the UN peace keeping forces in the past four years after UNPROFOR and UNCRO. They followed the EU Monitoring mission and the International Red Cross.

    The US gen. Jacques Klein who is expected to to be the head UNTAES said that Serb acceptance of the foreseen demilitarization of the area was a test of Serb readiness for implementation of the agreement and accordingly, the reason for the UN deployment and future acting in the area. Vice-president of Croatian government Ivica Kostovic said he was encouraged by such a clear and resolute view of the gen. Klein adding that Croatian government was interested in securing unimpeded and rapid return of the refugees to the area. Further talks on the issue are expected. Serb side and the international officials put the question of return of many Serbs being resettled from Croatia, particularly from the area of the so-called Krajina. Ivica Kostovic said that Croatian government was ready to grant full security to Serb population in eastern Slavonia, but he believed the situation would be made easier if the persons who committed crimes in the war against Croatia would leave the area.

    UN decided to keep its monitoring mission at Prevlaka although the head of the president Tudjman's office Ivo Sanader said it was not necessary. Due to refusal of Croatia to give Prevlaka to Montenegro and "Yugoslavia", Belgrade declined to recognize integrity of Croatia.

    After recent presidential statement and resolution condemning Croatia of violating the rights of property and return for its fled Serbs and other sort of human rights, diplomatic pressure on Croatia as "Radio Deutsche Welle" reports, has been intensified due to growing tension in Mostar and the B-H Federation. /end/ A.S.

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