Subscribe to our Personal NewsPaper (Free Custom News Service) A)? GHT="50">
Compact version
Today's Suggestion
Read The "Macedonian Question" (by Maria Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou)
HomeAbout HR-NetNewsWeb SitesDocumentsOnline HelpUsage InformationContact us
Monday, 18 November 2019
 
News
  Latest News (All)
     From Greece
     From Cyprus
     From Europe
     From Balkans
     From Turkey
     From USA
  Announcements
  World Press
  News Archives
Web Sites
  Hosted
  Mirrored
  Interesting Nodes
Documents
  Special Topics
  Treaties, Conventions
  Constitutions
  U.S. Agencies
  Cyprus Problem
  Other
Services
  Personal NewsPaper
  Greek Fonts
  Tools
  F.A.Q.
 

OMRI Daily Digest II, No. 238, 8 December 1995

From: "Steve Iatrou" <siatrou@cdsp.neu.edu>

Open Media Research Institute Directory

CONTENTS

  • [1] PERRY SAYS U.S. IS NOT NEUTRAL OVER BOSNIA.

  • [2] ARMING MUSLIMS IS CENTRAL TO U.S. STRATEGY IN BOSNIA.

  • [3] SERBIA REJECTS FRENCH WARNING OVER PILOTS.

  • [4] SERBIAN OPPOSITION LEADER BACKS PEACE ACCORD.

  • [5] RUGOVA ASKS U.S. FOR MEDIATION IN KOSOVO CONFLICT.

  • [6] "OIL MEN ARE FASTER THAN STATES."

  • [7] CROATIA TO COOPERATE WITH HAGUE-BASED TRIBUNAL.

  • [8] SLOVAK PREMIER IN SLOVENIA.

  • [9] ROMANIAN PRESIDENT ON ROMANIAN-HUNGARIAN RELATIONS . . .

  • [10] . . . AND ON REVIVAL OF IRON GUARD.

  • [11] BULGARIAN PRESIDENT MEETS WITH POPE.

  • [12] BULGARIA WILL PROVIDE AID, BUT NO TROOPS TO EX-YUGOSLAVIA.

  • [13] ALBANIAN PARLIAMENT PASSES LIBERAL ABORTION LAW.

  • [14] BULGARIAN PRESIDENT IN ALBANIA.


  • OMRI DAILY DIGEST

    No. 238, Part II, 8 December 1995

    SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [1] PERRY SAYS U.S. IS NOT NEUTRAL OVER BOSNIA.

    Secretary of Defense William Perry said "we believe that the Bosnian government and people have suffered atrocities and killings, and we don't approach [implementing the Dayton peace agreement] as psychologically neutral." He added that the U.S. will nonetheless try to be "evenhanded," the International Herald Tribune reported on 8 December. Monitor Radio the previous evening said "thousands of Bosnian Serbs stomped on the American flag" in a demonstration that Nasa Borba on 8 December called "well organized." The BBC reported that U.S. diplomats are urging the Bosnian government to send home the roughly 2,000 Islamic fighters from around the Muslim world. The tough irregulars are seen likely to cause problems for implementing the peace settlement. -- Patrick Moore

    [2] ARMING MUSLIMS IS CENTRAL TO U.S. STRATEGY IN BOSNIA.

    As the deployment of NATO troops in the former Yugoslavia gathers pace, the arming of the Bosnian government has become a central element in the Clinton administration's strategy to gain U.S. congressional support for the deployment of American troops to the region, Western agencies reported. Addressing the U.S. Senate on 6 December, Assistant Secretary of State Richard Holbrooke said the U.S. has assured the Bosnian government in Dayton that the US "will lead an international effort to ensure that the Bosnians have what they need to defend themselves adequately when IFOR [the NATO implementation force] leaves." He added that the U.S. will not train troops but will rely on "third parties" such as the private company MPRI, composed of retired U.S. officers, who helped train Croatian forces. -- Michael Mihalka

    [3] SERBIA REJECTS FRENCH WARNING OVER PILOTS.

    The rump Yugoslav Foreign Ministry rebuffed the French demand that President Slobodan Milosevic ensure the quick return of the two downed aviators. The Serbian statement rejected "all tendentious interpretations of the incident." The International Herald Tribune on 8 December also reported that the UN has protested the eviction of 60 Muslim families by the Serbs in northern Bosnia. Hina the previous day said that a joint commission for missing persons has been set up by Belgrade and Zagreb and has already begun work. -- Patrick Moore

    [4] SERBIAN OPPOSITION LEADER BACKS PEACE ACCORD.

    Vuk Draskovic, leader of the Serbian Renewal Movement (SPO), has become the first head of a major Serbian opposition party to back the Dayton peace plan for Bosnia. Nasa Borba on 8 December published an article by Draskovic in which he explained his position by saying "I do not want to be associated with the charges that in Dayton [Serbian President Slobodan] Milosevic sold out the Serbs on that side of the Drina and shamed the ones on this side of the Drina." He went on to write that the current peace "is neither righteous nor base. It is woven from blood and tears, from illusions and deceit . . . , from ideological and mafia-backed patriotism . . . and from wounds that will not be able to heal for a long time to come. . . . But this peace is the one outlet, the only hope and chance, that our future generations will not be born into a life [world] that resembles ours." -- Stan Markotich

    [5] RUGOVA ASKS U.S. FOR MEDIATION IN KOSOVO CONFLICT.

    Kosovar shadow-state President Ibrahim Rugova has asked U.S. secretary of State Warren Christopher to mediate in the Kosovo conflict. After meeting with Christopher in Washington on 7 December, Rugova said he had received a pledge of support. State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns pointed out that the U.S. has pressed Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic to respect the rights of the Albanian majority and that "we have a general assurance from the Serbs that the rights of the Albanian community will be respected," Reuters reported on 7 December. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [6] "OIL MEN ARE FASTER THAN STATES."

    This is how Slobodna Dalmacija on 7December described a secretive meeting two days earlier between representatives of the Croatian oil company INA and its Serbian counterpart, Jugopetrol. The daily said that the two oil giants are anxious to start doing business again even before relations between Zagreb and Belgrade have been formally normalized. In particular, the firms want to see the Adriatic oil pipeline reopened "as soon as possible." This quick readiness to do business suggests that the war has been not the inevitable result of "ancient hatreds" but rather about land, money, and power. -- Patrick Moore

    [7] CROATIA TO COOPERATE WITH HAGUE-BASED TRIBUNAL.

    Croatian Minister of Foreign Affairs Mate Granic has said that Croatia wants to cooperate with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and will act in accordance with its requests regarding Dario Kordic, who has been charged with war crimes. He added, however, that Croatia will also try to defend him, RFE/RL and BETA reported on 7 December. According to Granic, Kordic has shown his understanding of the seriousness of the charges by resigning as head of the Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ) in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Granic added that he is negotiating with Justice Richard Goldstone on the possibility of Kordic's remaining in Croatia while defending himself. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [8] SLOVAK PREMIER IN SLOVENIA.

    Vladimir Meciar, during a two-day visit to Slovenia, concluded with his Slovenian counterpart, Janez Drnovsek, an air traffic agreement, Slovak and Slovenian media reported. Meciar observed that relations between Slovakia and Slovenia are "very close" and will certainly improve, especially in the economic realm, once Slovenia becomes a full member of the Central European Free Trade Agreement (CEFTA) on 1 January. Meciar also met with Slovenian President Milan Kucan and opened a Slovak embassy in Ljubljana. -- Stan Markotich and Sharon Fisher

    [9] ROMANIAN PRESIDENT ON ROMANIAN-HUNGARIAN RELATIONS . . .

    Presidential spokesman Traian Chebeleu told a press conference in Bucharest that "anti-reconciliation attitudes" are being constantly expressed both in Hungary and among leaders of the Hungarian minority in Romania, Romanian media reported on 7-8 December. Chebeleu said "extremist voices are emerging, as if coordinated, to undermine" President Ion Iliescu's proposal for a historic reconciliation with Hungary. As an example, he quoted Bela Pomogats, chairman of the Writers' Union of Hungary, as saying "the initiative is wrong and inopportune" and makes only empty promises. The Hungarian minority's claim to have Church properties restituted is viewed by Iliescu as "an aberration," he noted. -- Matyas Szabo

    [10] . . . AND ON REVIVAL OF IRON GUARD.

    Chebeleu also said that President Iliescu was "concerned" about growing signs that a revival of the fascist legionary movement was under way. He pointed to legionary instruction camps, marches, the dissemination of overtly pro-legionary literature and articles, and veiled pro-legionary television programs. Chebeleu said the president was "astonished" by the attempt to "justify legionary assassinations." The latter reference was apparently directed at opposition senator Sabin Ivan who criticized Iliescu's address commemorating the assassination of historian Nicolae Iorga by members of the legionary movement in 1940. Sabin had said the "crimes" committed against the movement by its adversaries should also be revealed. -- Michael Shafir

    [11] BULGARIAN PRESIDENT MEETS WITH POPE.

    Zhelyu Zhelev was received by Pope John Paul II in a private audience on 7 December, 24 chasa reported. The Pope said he will travel to Bulgaria, adding that his visit should silence all allegations about a Bulgarian involvement in the attempt on his life in May 1981, Zhelev's spokesman Valentin Stoyanov said. With regard to the so-called "Bulgarian trail," the Pope noted that "guilt is always personal." Ali Agca, who tried to kill the Pope in 1981, said in September that Bulgaria was not involved in the attempt. After meeting with the Pope, Zhelev left Italy for an official visit to Albania (see below). -- Stefan Krause

    [12] BULGARIA WILL PROVIDE AID, BUT NO TROOPS TO EX-YUGOSLAVIA.

    Bulgarian Deputy Foreign Minister Stefan Staykov on 7 December said his country will provide medical and technical aid to the peacekeeping forces in the former Yugoslavia but has no plans to send military personnel, Reuters reported. Staykov also announced that Bulgaria and rump Yugoslavia next week will sign agreements on economic cooperation and air traffic control. -- Stefan Krause

    [13] ALBANIAN PARLIAMENT PASSES LIBERAL ABORTION LAW.

    The Albanian parliament has passed legislation allowing abortion as a "family planning method," international agencies reported on 8 December. Abortion was considered a crime under communism. But with the current lack of contraceptives in the country, lawmakers appear to have adopted a more liberal stance. Some 30,000 abortions are estimated to take place every year. Often illegal abortions end fatally because of poor medical equipment and knowledge. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [14] BULGARIAN PRESIDENT IN ALBANIA.

    During his visit to Tirana on 7-8 December, Zhelyu Zhelev discussed with his Albanian counterpart, Sali Berisha, plans to build a highway, railway, and telecommunications corridor between Durres, Skopje, Sofia, and Istanbul. According to Zhelev, Italian President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro has said Italy will financially back the project. Both presidents called for regional cooperation in the Balkans following the end of the Bosnian war and for talks between Serbs and Kosovar Albanians, international agencies reported on 7 December. -- Fabian Schmidt

    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz

    Back to Top
    Copyright 1995-2016 HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network). An HRI Project.
    All Rights Reserved.

    HTML by the HR-Net Group / Hellenic Resources Institute
    news2html v2.13 run on Friday, 8 December 1995 - 19:41:22