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OMRI Daily Digest II, No. 241, 13 December 1995

From: "Steve Iatrou" <siatrou@cdsp.neu.edu>

Open Media Research Institute Directory

CONTENTS

  • [1] BOSNIA CONFERENCE OPENS NEAR PARIS.

  • [2] BOSNIAN FEDERATION ASSEMBLY BACKS DAYTON ACCORD.

  • [3] CROATIAN OPPOSITION FAILS TO BLOCK GOVERNMENT OVER DAYTON.

  • [4] SERBIAN PRESIDENT OPTIMISTIC ABOUT PEACE PROSPECTS.

  • [5] ROMANIAN CONTRIBUTION TO NATO FORCE IN BOSNIA.

  • [6] DNIESTER TEACHERS, LAWYERS STRIKE.

  • [7] "THE TSAR IS COMING."

  • [8] BULGARIAN CONSTITUTIONAL COURT RULES ON MEDIA CONTROL.

  • [9] ALBANIAN JOURNALIST BEATEN UP BY POLICE.


  • OMRI DAILY DIGEST

    No. 241, Part II, 13 December 1995

    SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [1] BOSNIA CONFERENCE OPENS NEAR PARIS.

    Delegates from the five-country Contact Group meet on 13 December with representatives of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, including Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Iran, Malaysia, Morocco, Pakistan, Senegal, and Turkey, to discuss stability in the Balkans. The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung said that the Bosnian conference is taking place 50 km north of Paris near Roissy airport because of the strike-induced problems in the French capital. Meanwhile, in the Sarajevo suburbs run by the Pale Serbs, AFP reported that 98.78% of the voters rejected the Dayton agreement returning them to Bosnian government authority. The validity of the ballot is recognized only by the Bosnian Serbs. -- Patrick Moore

    [2] BOSNIAN FEDERATION ASSEMBLY BACKS DAYTON ACCORD.

    Following a long discussion, the Bosnian Federation's Constituent Assembly accepted the Dayton peace accords on 12 December, Hina reported the same day. Assembly members also agreed that new federal laws proposed in Dayton should take effect on 20 December in keeping with the prescribed time schedule. They authorized Federation President Kresimir Zubak to sign the agreement in Paris on 14 December on its behalf, while Hina quoted Bosnia-Herzegovina's President Alija Izetbegovic as saying "we travel to Paris to sign the deal, not to negotiate." However, at a previously unannounced session the same day, the Bosnian republican parliament decided to reserve the right to annul the Dayton accord if it is not carried out in due time. In such a case, the constitution of Bosna- Herzegovina, as envisaged in the Dayton text, would be annulled and the republican parliament would regain legislative power from the federal authorities. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [3] CROATIAN OPPOSITION FAILS TO BLOCK GOVERNMENT OVER DAYTON.

    Both houses of the Croatian parliament on 12 December approved Foreign Minister Mate Granic's report on the Dayton peace talks and the Basic Agreement on the Region of Eastern Slavonia, Baranja, and Western Srijem, Hina reported the same day. An opposition motion calling for Posavina to be included in the Croat-Muslim federation and prohibiting negotiations on Prevlaka failed. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [4] SERBIAN PRESIDENT OPTIMISTIC ABOUT PEACE PROSPECTS.

    Slobodan Milosevic, following meetings on 11 December with co-chairman of the International Conference on Former Yugoslavia Thorvald Stoltenberg, told Radio Serbia that the Dayton peace accord signaled that a lasting regional peace was at hand. At the same time, he distanced himself from the Bosnian Serbs and any possible actions they may undertake to undermine the peace. When asked whether they would seek to foment regional hostilities, Milosevic said such an eventuality was unlikely, but he did not rule it out. -- Stan Markotich

    [5] ROMANIAN CONTRIBUTION TO NATO FORCE IN BOSNIA.

    Romania hopes to increase its ties with NATO by contributing engineering and telecommunications units to the NATO peace-keeping forces in Bosnia. Radu Timofte, chairman of the Senate's Defense Committee, told a NATO delegation that his country's participation in the peace-keeping operations in Bosnia would achieve far better results than "years of seminars" on the interaction of the Romanian armed forces and NATO, Rompres and international agencies reported on 11-12 December. Timofte also told the delegation that all East Central European states should be integrated into NATO at the same time to avoid creating insecurity. -- Michael Shafir

    [6] DNIESTER TEACHERS, LAWYERS STRIKE.

    More than 5,000 teachers in the breakaway Dniester republic are refusing to return to class after going on strike six days ago, the strike committee chairwoman told Infotag on 12 December. They are demanding higher salaries and normal working conditions. A total of 74 schools and kindergartens are closed, and the protest movement is expanding to other schools, she said. Court officials from the Rybnitsa district joined the strike this week with similar demands, paralyzing the work of the republic's courts. The strikers say they will resume work only after all their demands have been met. President Igor Smirnov said that those demands cannot be met but that the authorities "will consider the problem." -- Matyas Szabo

    [7] "THE TSAR IS COMING."

    Under this headline, Demokratsiya on 13 Decemberpublished a declaration by former Bulgarian Tsar Simeon II, who is living in exile in Spain. Simeon said he is willing to make his first visit to Bulgaria since he was forced to abdicate and leave the country following a referendum abolishing the monarchy in 1946. He gave no date for his visit and did not say how long he intended to stay. In November, 101 intellectuals wrote to the former monarch asking him to help bring the country out of its present crisis. The Foreign Ministry said he will encounter no problems upon returning to Bulgaria since he was never stripped of his Bulgarian citizenship, AFP reported. -- Stefan Krause

    [8] BULGARIAN CONSTITUTIONAL COURT RULES ON MEDIA CONTROL.

    The Constitutional Court on 12 December overruled the parliament's decision to transfer some of its legal powers to the parliamentary Commission for Radio, TV, and the Bulgarian Telegraph Agency, Standart reported the following day. The judges also ruled that the commission does not have the right to decide on the management of state-run media, structural changes, the program schedule, or the media's statutes. But it retains the right to propose the directors-general to the parliament and to discuss and propose media-related legislation. The parliament had turned over those rights to the commission after the Constitutional Court on 19 September declared the provisional statute on the national media's operations unconstitutional. The judges ruled that the commission does not have the right to take decisions on behalf of the parliament. -- Stefan Krause

    [9] ALBANIAN JOURNALIST BEATEN UP BY POLICE.

    Gezim Ashimi, a journalist for Koha Jone, was called in for questioning on 12 December at the Devoll police station, where he was severely beaten up, the same newspaper reported the next day. Ashimi was attacked by an officer who previously had been suspended from work for misconduct; reportedly, no other policemen intervened. The officer claimed that the journalist had discredited the police force in an article published on 8 December. When Ashimi was allowed to leave the police station two hours after being called in, the police station chief reportedly told him "not to write anything against the president." -- Fabian Schmidt

    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz

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