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OMRI Daily Digest II, No. 245, 19 December 1995

From: "Steve Iatrou" <siatrou@cdsp.neu.edu>

Open Media Research Institute Directory

CONTENTS

  • [1] A FEDERAL MODEL FOR SARAJEVO?

  • [2] SUSPECTED WAR CRIMINAL ARRESTED.

  • [3] WORLD BANK REQUESTS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BOSNIA.

  • [4] BELGRADE BLAMES BOSNIAN MUSLIMS FOR SREBRENICA MASSACRE.

  • [5] TETOVO UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES FIRST ANNIVERSARY.

  • [6] ROMANIAN REVOLUTION ANNIVERSARY SPARKS CONTROVERSY.

  • [7] ROMANIA TO TIGHTEN CONTROL ON CIVIL AVIATION.

  • [8] MOLDOVAN REACTIONS TO RUSSIAN ELECTIONS.

  • [9] SEVEN BULGARIAN JOURNALISTS FIRED.

  • [10] KOZLODUY COULD AFFECT BULGARIAN TIES WITH EU.

  • [11] ALBANIAN PRESIDENT IN GERMANY.

  • [12] FIRST GREEK-MACEDONIAN TALKS ON NAME ISSUE.


  • OMRI DAILY DIGEST

    No. 245, Part II, 19 December 1995

    SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [1] A FEDERAL MODEL FOR SARAJEVO?

    Boza Kljajic of the Serbian Civic Councilhas suggested that Sarajevo be set up as s special federal district on the model of Brussels, Mexico City, or Washington. The Council represents the anti-nationalist Serbs who have spent the entire war in the part of Sarajevo controlled by the Bosnian government. Nasa Borba on 19 December quoted him as saying that the city should remain a united and undivided one in which all citizens and peoples would enjoy total equality. Reuters said the previous day, however, that the Serbian nationalist leadership in Pale has other ideas. It met with Belgrade architects to plan a new city consisting of Serbian refugees from Sarajevo who refuse to live under government rule. Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic said that rump Yugoslavia will foot the bill. -- Patrick Moore

    [2] SUSPECTED WAR CRIMINAL ARRESTED.

    The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung on 19 December reported that an unnamed man was arrested in Dusseldorf on the suspicion of having assisted in genocide. The 48-year-old Serb was supposedly the leader of a chetnik gang that committed atrocities in Bosnia in the spring and summer of 1992. The paper added that a sniper in Sarajevo fired on a tram and wounded a woman. -- Patrick Moore

    [3] WORLD BANK REQUESTS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BOSNIA.

    The World Bank is asking Western countries to finance a $100 million assistance initiative for Bosnia, Hina reported on 16 December. The money would go for establishing state institutions, financing small and medium-sized enterprises, and funding social welfare. The bank estimates that reconstructing Bosnia will cost $5.1 billion. -- Michael Wyzan

    [4] BELGRADE BLAMES BOSNIAN MUSLIMS FOR SREBRENICA MASSACRE.

    Reuters on 18 December reported that official Belgrade has defended the Bosnian Serbs against charges of massacring Bosnian Muslims and forcing some 5,500 people to go "missing" when Bosnian Serbs overran the Muslim enclave of Srebrenica in July. In a letter to the UN Security Council, Belgrade's representative to the UN and former Foreign Minister Vladislav Jovanovic charges that the Bosnian Muslims were themselves responsible for the atrocities. He asserted that as the Bosnian Serbs approached Srebrenica, "those [Bosnian Muslim] units which wanted to continue fighting were mercilessly killing those who wanted to surrender and were in favour of a ceasefire." Reuters suggests Jovanovic's remarks may be an effort to "head off" an expected UN resolution condemning the Bosnian Serbs for the atrocities. -- Stan Markotich

    [5] TETOVO UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES FIRST ANNIVERSARY.

    The illegal Albanian- language university in Tetovo celebrated its first anniversary on 16 December, MIC reported two days later. At a ceremony attended by Culture Minister Eshtref Aliu and ethnic Albanian legislators, university dean Fadil Sulejmani called 17 December, the day the university was founded, a "day of Albanian liberation in Macedonia." Police earlier this year destroyed parts of the self-proclaimed university's premises and prevented students from entering the building. Nonetheless, according to Sulejmani, the university has underground faculties of math, natural sciences, law, economy, philology, philosophy, and the arts. The university claims to have 1,300 students and 150 professors. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [6] ROMANIAN REVOLUTION ANNIVERSARY SPARKS CONTROVERSY.

    Valentin Gabrielescu, head of the Romanian Senate's Commission of Inquiry into the Events of December 1989, has accused President Ion Iliescu of being responsible for the bloodshed that followed the fall and execution of communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, Romanian and international media reported on 18 December. Iliescu was also accused of having used the revolt to stage a coup and of ordering Ceausescu's killing to prevent him from revealing what he knew about the country's new leaders. Some participants in the December 1989 events have decided to stage a posthumous retrial of Ceausescu because, they maintain, none of the charges against him holds water. President Iliescu told Mediafax that he may sue Gabrielescu. -- Matyas Szabo

    [7] ROMANIA TO TIGHTEN CONTROL ON CIVIL AVIATION.

    Romanian Transport Minister Aurel Novac, speaking on Radio Bucharest on 18 December, announced plans to tighten control on the country's civil aviation following two fatal crashes involving Romanian airliners this year. Novac said that aviation officials would conduct stricter controls to determine pilot errors or technical deficiencies. He expressed the hope that the new measures "will prevent accidents in the future." An Antonov-24 charter plane belonging to the Banat Air company crashed near Verona, in Italy, last week, killing all 49 people aboard. -- Dan Ionescu

    [8] MOLDOVAN REACTIONS TO RUSSIAN ELECTIONS.

    The outcome of the Russian parliamentary elections will not influence Moldovan foreign policy, an adviser to President Mircea Snegur told Infotag on 18 December. He described Russian Communist Party Chairman Gennadii Zyuganov's statement that the restoration of the USSR was inevitable as "irresponsible" and out of touch with reality. Another presidential adviser was quoted as saying that Moldova hoped that the new Russian State Duma would adopt a more realistic stance on both the ratification of the Russian-Moldovan Army Withdrawal Agreement and the settlement of the Dniester conflict. In a related development, leader of the Moldovan Communist Party Vladimir Voronin hailed the Communists' strong showing in the Russian elections. According to BASA-press, Voronin plans to discuss the Dniester conflict with the communist Duma deputies soon. -- Dan Ionescu

    [9] SEVEN BULGARIAN JOURNALISTS FIRED.

    Seven of the Bulgarian National Radio journalists who signed a declaration on 21 November accusing BNR's management of censorship were dismissed on 18 December, Bulgarian newspapers reported the following day. The dismissals occurred despite assurances from BNR Director-General Vecheslav Tunev that none of the protesters would be fired. Tunev said their actions would lead to a split within the radio. According to Trud, he accused them of "complete disloyalty." Among those dismissed are two deputy directors of BNR's Radio Horizont. Duma reports that the director and the editor-in-chief of BNR's [international] Radio Bulgaria were also replaced. -- Stefan Krause

    [10] KOZLODUY COULD AFFECT BULGARIAN TIES WITH EU.

    French European Affairs Minister Michel Barnier on 18 December said Bulgaria's Kozloduy nuclear plant could be a major obstacle in Sofia's efforts to join the EU, Reuters reported the same day. Speaking to a news conference in Sofia after talks with Bulgarian officials, Barnier said that "without wishing to point the finger at anyone . . . , [the nuclear issue] is an important one . . . and could be a determining factor in the process of EU enlargement." The decision to restart Kozloduy's Reactor No. 1 in October 1995 led to sharp reactions from Western countries that question the reactor's safety. Barnier said that Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Trade Kiril Tsochev told him the reactor will be shut down in April for further checks. -- Stefan Krause

    [11] ALBANIAN PRESIDENT IN GERMANY.

    Sali Berisha, on an official visit to Bonn, met with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel on 18 December, the Albanian-language service of Deutsche Welle reported. Berisha discussed economic cooperation between the two countries and urged Albania's integration into the European Union and NATO. Berisha will also meet with German President Roman Herzog, Finance Minister Theo Waigel, and Economic Cooperation and Development Minister Carl-Dieter Spranger as well as representatives of the German Chambers of Commerce and Industry. Berisha urged international support for a resolution of the Kosovo crisis that respects internationally recognized borders. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [12] FIRST GREEK-MACEDONIAN TALKS ON NAME ISSUE.

    Greek Ambassador to the UN Christos Zacharakis and his Macedonian counterpart, Ivan Toshevski, met in New York on 16 December for first talks about the disputed name issue, Nova Makedonija reported on 18 December, citing Greek media reports. According to those reports, the talks took place in a positive and "very encouraging" atmosphere and lasted more than four hours. Both sides said the problem should be solved as soon as possible and both made suggestions for a possible solution. Further progress is expected after both sides report to their governments. UN mediator Cyrus Vance called the meeting "extremely interesting" and said similar meetings are expected to take place after the Christmas holidays. -- Stefan Krause

    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz

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