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OMRI Daily Digest II, No. 248, 22 December 1995

From: "Steve Iatrou" <siatrou@cdsp.neu.edu>

Open Media Research Institute Directory

CONTENTS

  • [1] MUSLIM-CROATIAN FEDERATION SETS UP UNIFIED COMMANDS IN BOSNIA.

  • [2] UN CONDEMNS SERBS FOR SREBRENICA MASSACRES.

  • [3] INTERNATIONAL POLICE TASK FORCE LAUNCHED.

  • [4] IFOR COMMANDER MEETS WITH LOCAL CHIEFS OF STAFF.

  • [5] SWISS NAMED HUMAN RIGHTS OMBUDSMAN FOR BOSNIA.

  • [6] SERBIAN RADICAL LEGISLATORS LOSE MANDATE IN MONTENEGRIN PARLIAMENT.

  • [7] MACEDONIAN PRESIDENT SAYS HE WILL RESUME DUTIES.

  • [8] ROMANIAN PRESIDENT ON 1989 REVOLUTION.

  • [9] IMF EXTENDS, INCREASES ROMANIA'S STAND-BY CREDIT.

  • [10] ZYUGANOV ADDRESSES TRANSDNIESTRIAN ELECTORATE.

  • [11] KOZLODUY TO HELP SUPPLY BULGARIA WITH ELECTRICITY.

  • [12] GREECE TO SEND TROOPS TO BOSNIA.


  • OMRI DAILY DIGEST

    No. 248, Part II, 22 December 1995

    SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [1] MUSLIM-CROATIAN FEDERATION SETS UP UNIFIED COMMANDS IN BOSNIA.

    The federal parliament met in Sarajevo on 21 December and established joint commands for the army and police--just after the 20 December deadline set down in the Dayton treaty--the VOA's Croatian-language service said the next day. There will be a joint defense ministry and command, but recruits will be able to choose whether they want to serve in the Croatian or mainly Muslim part of the army. AFP added that the two police forces will also report to one center. The Muslim-Croat federation is treated as one entity in the Dayton agreement, but the allied armies to date have had only coordinated activities and do not have an integrated command structure. On the contrary, the Bosnian Croat army is closely linked to the Croatian military. Elsewhere, the International Herald Tribune on 22 December reported that the U.S. has named Pentagon Bosnia expert James Pardew to head the project to upgrade government forces with Turkish assistance. -- Patrick Moore

    [2] UN CONDEMNS SERBS FOR SREBRENICA MASSACRES.

    The Security Council has rebuked rump Yugoslav representative Vladislav Jovanovic, who tried to claim that the Muslims killed their own people in Srebrenica in July. The resolution clearly blames the Serbs for the murder, rape, expulsion, and conscription into forced labor of civilians, and mentions Srebrenica, Zepa, Banja Luka, and Sanski Most. It also singles out Bosnian Serb leaders Radovan Karadzic and General Ratko Mladic as indicted war criminals, news agencies added. The massacre of around 5,000 mainly Muslim men has often been referred to as the single biggest atrocity in Europe since World War II. A report by Secretary-General Boutros Boutros Ghali and investigations by the Christian Science Monitor, independent Serbian journalists, and others clearly point to a mass killing, possibly led by Mladic himself. -- Patrick Moore

    [3] INTERNATIONAL POLICE TASK FORCE LAUNCHED.

    The Security Council also set up a 1,721-strong international police force to train and monitor local police and assist them as need be. This will be the biggest armed UN presence in the area following the disbanding of UNPROFOR. The UNHCR will supervise the upcoming exchange of prisoners. Meanwhile in Pale, Karadzic told Red Cross officials that he will do all he can to make sure that Dayton's 20 January deadline for releasing prisoners is met. Elsewhere, Serbian villagers in Dojici, near the Croatian front lines, gave a rousing welcome to British troops, Reuters reported on 21 December. They credited the Dayton agreement with saving them from a Croatian occupation. -- Patrick Moore

    [4] IFOR COMMANDER MEETS WITH LOCAL CHIEFS OF STAFF.

    The chiefs of staff of the Muslim, Croatian, and Serbian forces--meeting in Sarajevo on 21 December with the commander of the NATO-led implementation force (IFOR), Admiral Leighton Smith--promised to cooperate with IFOR, Western agencies reported. They said that they would restrain their forces, leave the "zones of separation," and allow unrestricted access for IFOR. Smith said after the meeting that the local forces have so far proved extremely cooperative with IFOR. -- Michael Mihalka

    [5] SWISS NAMED HUMAN RIGHTS OMBUDSMAN FOR BOSNIA.

    The OSCE on 21 December named Swiss diplomat Gret Haller as human rights ombudsman for Bosnia, Western agencies reported. The Dayton peace accord created the post and invested it with responsibility for investigating alleged human rights abuses and initiating proceedings against those involved. Haller currently serves as the Swiss representative to the Council of Europe. -- Michael Mihalka

    [6] SERBIAN RADICAL LEGISLATORS LOSE MANDATE IN MONTENEGRIN PARLIAMENT.

    Eight former Serbian Radical Party legislators were suspended from their duties in the Montenegrin parliament on 21 December, Nasa Borba reported the following day. The parliamentary commission on immunity and mandates was abiding by a decision taken by the Justice Ministry and the Montenegrin election commission to ban the legislators from the parliament. The commission concluded that following a split in the Serbian Radical Party, the legislators were no longer members of the registered Serbian Radical Party but of an unregistered extraparliamentary party with the same name led by Drago Bakrac. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [7] MACEDONIAN PRESIDENT SAYS HE WILL RESUME DUTIES.

    Kiro Gligorov has said he will return to office at the beginning of 1996. In his first interview since the attempt on his life on 3 October, published in Nova Makedonija on 22 December, he rejected speculations about a successor and said he is "convinced that the citizens of Macedonia will elect their president in the next regular elections." He noted that the attempt on his life "will [possibly] remain a mystery for a long time." Gligorov said there is no change in the Macedonian position on the name issue. He said that "after Dayton and Paris, Macedonia adheres to its well-known position of being an independent and sovereign country oriented toward European integration." He added that "Macedonia maintains the standpoint that it is one of the six equal successors of the former Yugoslavia." -- Stefan Krause

    [8] ROMANIAN PRESIDENT ON 1989 REVOLUTION.

    Ion Iliescu--in an address to a 21 December symposium on the 1989 revolution broadcast live on Radio Bucharest--denounced attempts to "denigrate and mystify" the significance of the uprising. He said revolutions should be defined not according to how they were carried out but according to what they achieved. Viewed from this perspective, he said, the December 1989 overthrow of the communist regime was indeed revolutionary. Iliescu denied accusations that he had in any way attempted to bring about a Soviet intervention in Romania at the time. He said Washington wanted to give Moscow a green light to intervene but Moscow refused. He also denied accusations that he staged the shooting and killing of civilians as part of a scenario to justify the takeover. Iliescu said he regretted the quick trial and execution of Nicolae Ceausescu but argued that the decision was necessary to stop the revolution from turning into a civil war. -- Michael Shafir

    [9] IMF EXTENDS, INCREASES ROMANIA'S STAND-BY CREDIT.

    RFE/RL's correspondent in Washington on 21 December reported that the IMF has agreed to extend Romania's current stand-by credit line and to add $280 million to the funds available. The extension follows lengthy negotiations. Earlier this year, Romania was denied access to the remaining $110 million from a 1994 stand-by loan because it had not met the original agreement's performance criteria. The renewed program and the additional credit, available through April 1997, will be used to support Romania's adjustment and structural reform policies. -- Michael Shafir

    [10] ZYUGANOV ADDRESSES TRANSDNIESTRIAN ELECTORATE.

    Gennadii Zyuganov, chairman of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, which emerged victorious in the recent parliamentary elections, has called on Transdniestrian residents to take an active part in the elections to the region's Supreme Soviet and the referendum on the region's constitution scheduled for 24 December. Infotag and BASA-press on 21 December reported that Zyuganov expressed his party's support for "the Transdniestrian people's wish to be masters of their own destinies" and said they should "demonstrate to the CIS people the common wish to live in one family." Romanian President Ion Iliescu on 21 December remarked that Zyuganov's address showed "flagrant disregard for non-interference in the internal affairs of the new independent states." -- Michael Shafir

    [11] KOZLODUY TO HELP SUPPLY BULGARIA WITH ELECTRICITY.

    Trifon Tsvetkov, chairman of the Bulgarian National Electrical Company (NEK), said at a press conference on 21 December that the country will not experience problems with its electricity supply this winter, Bulgaria media reported the next day. All three blocks of the coal-fired Maritsa Iztok plant are functioning, as are all but one at the Kozloduy nuclear plant. On 18 December, the French European Affairs minister had warned that the country's chances of entering the EU were jeopardized by keeping Kozloduy in service (see OMRI Daily Digest, 19 December 1995). It was also announced that electricity consumption will rise by 1.2% in 1995. Due to low prices, the NEK will lose 2 billion leva ($284 million). Industrial enterprises owe the company 2 billion leva, while the factory producing coal briquettes owes it 1.2 billion leva. -- Michael Wyzan

    [12] GREECE TO SEND TROOPS TO BOSNIA.

    Greek government spokesman Tilemachos Hytiris on 21 December said the cabinet has decided to send three ships, three helicopters, and 250 men to Bosnia as part of the multi-national peace-keeping force, Reuters reported the same day. Greece, which maintains good ties with Serbia, refused to participate in any international missions to the former Yugoslavia before the signing of the Dayton and Paris agreements, saying Balkan countries should keep out of the conflict. -- Stefan Krause

    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz

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