Browse through our Interesting Nodes on the Environment Read the Convention Relating to the Regime of the Straits (24 July 1923) Read the Convention Relating to the Regime of the Straits (24 July 1923)
HR-Net - Hellenic Resources Network Compact version
Today's Suggestion
Read The "Macedonian Question" (by Maria Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou)
HomeAbout HR-NetNewsWeb SitesDocumentsOnline HelpUsage InformationContact us
Friday, 20 May 2022
 
News
  Latest News (All)
     From Greece
     From Cyprus
     From Europe
     From Balkans
     From Turkey
     From USA
  Announcements
  World Press
  News Archives
Web Sites
  Hosted
  Mirrored
  Interesting Nodes
Documents
  Special Topics
  Treaties, Conventions
  Constitutions
  U.S. Agencies
  Cyprus Problem
  Other
Services
  Personal NewsPaper
  Greek Fonts
  Tools
  F.A.Q.
 

Voice of America, 99-09-29

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] KOSOVO UNREST (L-ONLY) BY TIM BELAY (PRISTINA)
  • [02] KOSOVO CONDITIONS (L ONLY) BY LARRY FREUND (NEW YORK)
  • [03] KOSOVO CORPS REGISTRATION (L ONLY) BY LISA SCHLEIN (GENEVA)
  • [04] YUGO DEMO L-ONLY BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)
  • [05] TURKEY / KURDS (L ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)
  • [06] EMBASSY / GERMANY (L-ONLY) BY JONATHAN BRAUDE (BERLIN)
  • [07] GERMAN POLITICS BY RON PEMSTEIN (BERLIN)
  • [08] N-Y ECON WRAP (S&L) BY BRECK ARDERY (NEW YORK)
  • [09] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] KOSOVO UNREST (L-ONLY) BY TIM BELAY (PRISTINA)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254454
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: United Nations civilian police are investigating a grenade attack that killed two ethnic Serbs and injured 45 in Kosovo Tuesday Tim Belay reports from Pristina that the assault comes as ethnic violence in the Yugoslav province appears to be increasing.

    TEXT: The attack came when someone threw two hand grenades into a crowded market place Tuesday. All of the victims are ethnic Serbs. The incident happened in a region just outside of Pristina, which is heavily populated by Serbs. There have been skirmishes between ethnic Albanians and Kosovar Serbs there for the past few days. Daniela Rozgovona, of the United Nations mission in Kosovo, says peace in the province is ultimately in the hands of the people who live there.

    /// ACT ROZGOVONA ///

    There has been killing on both sides. The two communities do not make the connection. They do not talk to each other. The United Nations does what it can, but the United Nations is not responsible for the clashes between communities and the massive hatred, which is still ongoing after so many years of suffering.

    /// END ACT ///

    There have been other problems in Kosovo this week. A spokesman for the NATO-led peacekeeping mission in the province, Major Ole Irgens, says an Albanian girl died and four Serbian adults were injured in separate grenade explosions. Major Irgens called on Kosovars to stop what he described as a cycle of violence.

    /// ACT IRGENS ///

    The atrocities, the killings and harassment cannot be stopped by a military security presence along. The people of Kosovo must decide themselves to stop the hostile acts towards (one) another.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mrs. Rozgovona says the United Nations does not know why there has been an increase in fighting this week between the various ethnic groups in Kosovo.

    /// ACT ROZGOVONA ///

    I think it is the leadership, the local leadership, that has to step in now and help the international community first of all to perhaps explain. Why now? Why the escalation? And to help prevent further escalations.

    /// END ACT ///

    Bernard Kouchner, the United Nations civilian administrator for Kosovo, visited the victims of the attack, and condemned the violence. (Signed)
    NEB/TB/GE/JO 29-Sep-1999 10:31 AM EDT (29-Sep-1999 1431 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] KOSOVO CONDITIONS (L ONLY) BY LARRY FREUND (NEW YORK)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254474
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A senior United Nations official, Dennis McNamara, says more than 100-thousand Serbs and several thousand Roma or gypsies have left Kosovo in recent months. At the same time, Mr. McNamara expects a very tough winter for many Kosovars who remain in the Yugoslav province. More from correspondent Larry Freund in New York.

    TEXT: In an assessment for reporters, Mr. McNamara said violent attacks continue in Kosovo on a regular basis against Serbs and Roma, resulting in what he described as an exodus from Kosovo of some of them. Mr. McNamara, in charge of humanitarian affairs for the U-N mission in Kosovo, said there has been progress in recent weeks by the U-N mission. But he added that the political situation remains fragile within Kosovo and with respect to Belgrade. Mr. McNamara said the main challenge in the humanitarian area is to get the 800-thousand returnees to Kosovo through what he predicted will be another very difficult winter. Kits for temporary repairs to housing for 350-thousand Kosovars are being provided. But he emphasized that these will be only temporary repairs.

    /// MCNAMARA ACTUALITY ///

    There will be no major housing reconstruction in Kosovo before the winter. (That) is a very important message that we need to get out, including to the Kosovars, many of whose expectations have been unduly raised, partly by our presence I'm sure, by the constant number of agencies that are there.

    /// END ACTUALITY ///

    Mr. McNamara said housing for the remaining 350- thousand to 400-thousand returnees has been completely destroyed. And those people, the U-N official said, will have to be accommodated by host families or in tents for the winter. He said U-N agencies are racing against the winter to complete basic construction. (Signed) NEB/NY/LSF/gm 29-Sep-1999 16:15 PM EDT (29-Sep-1999 2015 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [03] KOSOVO CORPS REGISTRATION (L ONLY) BY LISA SCHLEIN (GENEVA)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254453
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The International Organization for Migration, I-O-M, says many former rebel fighters from the Kosovo Liberation Army, K-L-A, have expressed interest in joining the Kosovo Protection Corps -- a civilian group being formed to help rebuild the Serbian province. Lisa Schlein reports the Geneva-based I-O-M is in charge of registering and assisting all former K-L-A combatants rejoin civilian life after fighting earlier this year.

    TEXT: I-O-M says its offices throughout Kosovo have been swamped with former K-L-A combatants since the registration process began early last week. It says they have come to learn if they can get into the Kosovo Protection Corps or whether they can benefit from one of several programs aimed at helping them get work and resume their civilian lives. I-O-M spokesman Jean-Philippe Chauzy says the organization has registered more than three-thousand former K-L-A and has interviewed more than half of them.

    /// CHAUZY ACT ONE ///

    Now what's important is that after these one- thousand-447 people we've interviewed, almost 900 have expressed clearly their desire to be integrated in the Kosovo Protection Corps. Now, this is the first selection. We will obviously go through further selection criteria before these people actually are integrated in the Kosovo protection corps.

    /// END ACT ///

    The corps will be composed of five-thousand people, three-thousand of whom will be permanent and the rest temporary. Those who apply have to be between the ages of 18 and 55, be physically fit, and have what is called a "reasonable" level of education. The NATO-led peacekeeping troops in Kosovo and administrators who are behind the creation of the corps are actively encouraging Serbs, other minorities and women to join. Mr. Chauzy says about one dozen women have applied so far. But he says no ethnic minorities have turned up. He says the corps will be a strictly civilian force and not a precursor of a national army.

    /// CHAUZY ACT TWO ///

    The Kosovo protection corps will have essentially civilian duties. And, they will be called, for instance, in case of natural disasters as a quick corps to come and deal with such disasters. They also will be trained as firemen. They will be asked for instance in the coming months when the first snows come over Kosovo to make that the communication networks throughout the territory remains open.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Chauzy says the corps also will be asked to help rebuild Kosovo, which was heavily destroyed during the war. He says the corps essentially should be formed in the next 60 days. And, then the training program will begin. (Signed)
    NEB/LS/JWH/ENE 29-Sep-1999 10:45 AM EDT (29-Sep-1999 1445 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] YUGO DEMO L-ONLY BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254483
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Serbian police clashed with some 25,000 demonstrators who tried to march to the home of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic late Wednesday. When crowds swamped two central streets in Belgrade near a bombed-out military headquarters, police moved in and started beating those who could not run fast enough. Philip Smucker was in the crowd and has this report.

    TEXT:

    /// SOUND FROM DEMONSTRATION FADE UNDER ///

    Truncheon-wielding police cleared the streets late Wednesday after tens of thousands of demonstrators massed on a hill in an effort march on the president's home. It was the first sign that Belgrade's mostly-peaceful opposition street protests could take a turn towards violence. Protesters taunted Serbian policeman and blamed Mr. Milosevic for losing Kosovo province. Some of them shouted that the police should drive south to Kosovo and try to defend it instead of beating demonstrators. The rowdy crowd pushed through the first small cordon of some 20 riot police only to be met by hundreds of helmeted police with plastic shields and rubber truncheons. Several water cannons moved in to place as armored personnel carriers followed on behind. The emotional crowd beat down a retainer wall at a construction site of a bombed out building before the police moved in. Police ran forward in a line, beating those who stood in their way or could not run fast enough. Several reporters and old people were injured. The government says the protesters tried to provoke a tough response from police by their unruly behavior. The opposition coalition, The Alliance for Change, which led Wednesday's rally, has recently begun holding daily protest rallies in several Serbian towns. Crowds have swelled in numbers and the mood of the protesters has become angrier after nine straight days. Most demonstrators say their priority is to remove of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic from office. Alliance leaders say they hope a planned meeting for Thursday will help restore unity in the fractured opposition movement. If this were to happen, the daily anti-government protests could grow in size and intensity.
    NEB/PS/JO 29-Sep-1999 18:20 PM EDT (29-Sep-1999 2220 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] TURKEY / KURDS (L ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254465
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:
    /// EDS: RE-ISSUING 2-254456 TO FIX SEQUENCE OF EVENTS THROUGHOUT ///
    Intro: At least five-thousand Turkish troops backed by helicopter gunships have crossed into northern Iraq in pursuit of rebels of the Kurdistan Workers Party, or P-K-K. Amberin Zaman in Ankara reports the offensive comes as the Kurdish rebels reject Turkish calls for them to surrender unconditionally.

    TEXT: Members of a pro-Turkish Kurdish militia and an Iraqi Kurdish faction allied with Ankara are taking part in the offensive, which is concentrated near Haftanin and Metina along Turkey's border with northern Iraq. The troops were sent to help Turkish forces already in the region. Turkey maintains a year round military presence in the Kurdish-controlled enclave in northern Iraq in an attempt to stop P-K-K guerrillas from launching cross-border attacks against Turkish targets. Turkish officials describe the offensive as "routine." It comes as the P-K-K's imprisoned leader, Abdullah Ocalan warned that unless Turkey responded to his recent peace proposals, violence in the largely Kurdish southeast provinces could -- in his words -- spin out of control. Ocalan has made a series of conciliatory gestures since a Turkish court sentenced him to death on treason charges last June. Critics of his movement say the gestures are aimed at persuading Turkish authorities to spare his life. But Ocalan insists his only aim is to secure a lasting peace between Turks and Kurds. He has called on his followers to abandon their armed struggle for Kurdish self-rule and to withdraw from Turkish territory. Last week, Ocalan appealed to a group of his followers to surrender to Turkish authorities. But the Turkish military says it will keep up its campaign against the P-K-K until what it describes as "every last terrorist" is neutralized. Turkish officials say the P-K-K's peace overtures are designed to hide what they term its near total defeat at the hands of the powerful Turkish army. Against this background, analysts say, hopes are dwindling for an early end to the 15-year insurgency, which has claimed more than 30-thousand lives. In a statement carried Wednesday by the German-based Kurdish news agency, D-E-M, the P-K-K declared it would never surrender and accused the Turkish military of pursuing a policy of "war over peace, surrender over freedom, and oppression over democracy." (Signed) NEB/AZ/JWH/ENE/JP 29-Sep-1999 12:47 PM EDT (29-Sep-1999 1647 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [06] EMBASSY / GERMANY (L-ONLY) BY JONATHAN BRAUDE (BERLIN)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254463
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The United States may lose its chance to build a new embassy in front of Berlin's best known landmark, the Brandenburg Gate, unless a compromise can be reached over measures to protect the building from possible terrorist attack. Jonathan Braude reports from the German capital.

    TEXT: U-S and German officials have been negotiating for months over security measures at a new U-S Embassy building near the Brandenburg Gate. The German Senate voted to allow Washington to build its embassy on the city's most prestigious site shortly after national parliament decided to leave Bonn to return to Berlin. The United States got the right to build on the site largely out of gratitude for Washington's leading role in protecting West Berlin from the communist East during the Cold War. The new embassy complex will also be closer to the Brandenburg Gate than those of the other allied powers, Britain and France. But Washington's new security regulations, put in effect after bombing attacks on the U-S embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, has strained relations with Berlin's city leaders lately. If Washington gets its way, there will be a security zone of 30 meters round the embassy. That would mean diverting streets leading into Berlin's famous Tiergarten park and through the site set aside for a new Holocaust memorial. U-S officials argue that the security zone and its surroundings would not be as unsightly as the city government claims and, so far, have been unwilling to compromise. But Berlin authorities also seem unwilling to compromise. Peter Strieder, senator for planning and environment, says he cannot rebuild Berlin's historic center solely to meet the security needs of the Americans. This uncompromising approach has won widespread backing. But a recent visit to Washington by city planners appears to have produced some willingness to reach a settlement. A joint press statement issued after the visit said both sides had agreed that U-S security requirements for the embassy site were reasonable. It said they hoped an agreement could soon be reached to begin construction. But now, new comments from Mr. Strieder's office suggest the United States should either rethink its position or accept a different embassy site. The U-S embassy says it is standing by the joint U-S-German statement issued in Washington. One compromise being talked about in Berlin just might allow both sides to save face. It would mean redesigning the embassy building, making it taller and narrower and allowing the wider security zone without disrupting nearly roadways. (SIGNED)
    NEB/JB/GE/JP 29-Sep-1999 13:47 PM EDT (29-Sep-1999 1747 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [07] GERMAN POLITICS BY RON PEMSTEIN (BERLIN)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=BACKGROUND REPORT
    NUMBER=5-44374
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Germany's ruling Social Democrats face their last test of the year in elections on October 10th in the capital, Berlin. V-O-A Correspondent Ron Pemstein examines why the government of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has caused so much disappointment just one year after taking office.

    TEXT: The Karl Liebnecht House, headquarters for Germany's Communist Party from 1926 to 1933, today houses the party's heir - the Party of Democratic Socialism. And it is there that P-D-S member Wolfgang Meyer analyzes reaction to Chancellor Schroeder and his ruling Social Democrats. Mr. Meyer says it is clear why voters, particularly those in eastern Germany, are punishing the Social Democrats.

    /// MEYER ACT ONE ///

    Before the elections, they (Social Democrats) made a lot of promises. And because of these promises, people expected another policy of the Social Democrats in comparison with the Christian Democrats. The Christian Democrats did not win the elections because there had been a lot of failures and so on. So people expected another policy from the Social Democrats. But they found out now and are very disappointed that the Social Democrats are continuing practically the same policy as the Christian Democrats, even worse.

    /// END ACT ///

    Chancellor Schroeder is pushing an austerity program to cut back government spending on pensions and health care. The program increases taxes on gasoline and electricity. And it angers leftwing members of the Chancellor's own Social Democrats. Karl Kaiser is a former adviser to Chancellor Schroeder. Now the director of the German Society for Foreign Affairs, Mr. Kaiser says the change is necessary for Germany, regardless of the political cost.

    /// KAISER ACT TWO ///

    Schroeder at the moment is going through a deep valley of tears. That is due to the fact that he has to engineer something that Tony Blair in Britain has already done, namely, he has to change the party and he has to preside over a fundamental reform of the German welfare state. And unlike his colleague Tony Blair in Britain, where Margaret Thatcher did this work, he has to do it. Somebody has to do it. The Christian Democrats, if they were in power, would have to do the same thing, in fact they started.

    /// END ACT ///

    Voters in eastern Germany who supported the Chancellor in general elections last year have been returning to the Party of Democratic Socialism in state elections. Mr. Meyer explains their motivation is not nostalgia for the dictatorship of the Communist Party but for the benefits of the welfare state in the former East Germany.

    /// MEYER ACT TWO ///

    The G-D-R (German Democratic Republic) had also achievements in education, in health and welfare, and in other fields. All these things had been eliminated, and the result was that many East Germans felt as second class people, not only because the system has taken over but also the most important functions and posts in economic policy and administration had been taken over by West Germans.

    /// END ACT ///

    Western Germans account for 85 percent of the investments in eastern Germany since the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989. Eastern Germans run only five percent of the enterprises, with the rest being operated by foreign interests. Mr. Meyer says eastern Germans resent their wealth moving west. Unemployment remains twice as high in eastern Germany as it does in the west -- around 18 percent. That leads eastern Germans to say the freedom to travel abroad and to buy what they want on the market is being wasted because they do not have the money to spend if they do not have a job. Professor Kaiser says the Party of Democratic Socialism is taking advantage of that sentiment.

    /// KAISER ACT TWO ///

    For the time being, it is a party with a lot of elderly and old people. The old members, the nostalgic people, the people who lost privileges. But they do have some young people and it all depends on whether they will take a turn toward really distancing themselves from the previous communism and whether they will be able to get young people into the party. If they do that, they will turn into a genuine left party. At the moment, they are sheer populists and they grab all the discontented people in east (eastern) Germany and thereby have become such a strong party in east (eastern) Germany.

    /// END ACT ///

    The ruling Social Democrats face the last of this season's state contests here in Berlin on October 10th. The opinion surveys predict more losses for the Chancellor's party to the Christian Democrats and to the Party of Democratic Socialism. Professor Kaiser says Germany's reputation in Europe rides on Chancellor Schroeder pushing his austerity program past the criticism.

    /// KAISER ACT THREE ///

    If Germany does not repair and reform the welfare state, how can we expect the other countries to follow? And all us in Europe need a reform of the welfare state.

    /// END ACT ///

    Surviving that reform will be Gerhard Schroeder's toughest test since his election one year ago (SIGNED)
    NEB/RDP/JWH/BK 29-Sep-1999 15:11 PM LOC (29-Sep-1999 1911 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [08] N-Y ECON WRAP (S&L) BY BRECK ARDERY (NEW YORK)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254477
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Stock prices in the United States were down today (Wednesday) as concerns about interest rates, inflation and corporate profits continued. V-O-A Business Correspondent Breck Ardery reports from New York.

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed at 10- thousand-213, down 62 points. The Standard and Poor's 500 index closed at 12-hundred-68, down 13 points. The NASDAQ index lost almost one percent. Stocks traded in a narrow range until the last hour, when selling pressure accelerated. Analysts say traders continued to worry about whether the U-S central bank will raise interest rates, whether inflationary pressures are building and whether U-S corporate profits will live up to expectations. Oil prices rose above 25 dollars a barrel on the New York market for the first time in two-and-one-half years. Some analysts say oil prices could approach 30 dollars a barrel within the next six weeks.

    /// REST OPT FOR LONG ///

    The government reports that strong demand for autos and aircraft pushed up orders for expensive manufactured goods in August for the fourth month in a row. The figures surprised Wall Street analysts, who had expected a drop in durable goods orders. John Lonski of the Moody's investment research firm, says the durable goods figures indicate stronger U-S exports.

    /// LONSKI ACT ///

    The upturn in durable goods orders improves prospects for those manufacturing companies whose fortunes are closely tied to world economic activity.

    /// END ACT ///

    The stock of Amazon-dot-com, a leading on-line retailer, soared by 16 percent after the company announced a major expansion in the merchandise it will offer. Amazon will make deals with companies large and small to sell merchandise on the Amazon site. The company says small retailers will be charged as little as 10 dollars a month for access to Amazon's 12- million customers. Yahoo, the leading internet portal company, says it plans to remain independent and has no interest in being acquired. However, Yahoo President Timothy Koogle says the company will continue to make acquisitions of its own. The stock of the Avon cosmetics company fell 30 percent after the company warned that its fourth quarter earnings will be significantly below expectations. Avon cited problems in its Latin American operations for the profit shortfall. The stock of the Gillette personal care products company fell 10 percent, also because of an earnings warning. The stock of the Safeco Insurance Corporation dropped almost 10 percent on an earnings warning. Safeco says it expects to pay about 10-million dollars in claims related to Hurricane Floyd. Royal Air Maroc, the state airline of Morocco, will soon solicit bids for one-and-one-half-billion dollars worth of new jetliners. Although the Moroccan carrier's current fleet is entirely composed of Boeing aircraft from the United States, Royal Air Maroc says says it is open to bids from Europe's Airbus Industries. (Signed) NEB/NY/BA/LSF/WTW 29-Sep-1999 17:04 PM EDT (29-Sep-1999 2104 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [09] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=9/29/1999
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-11492
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: The U-S presidential election is more than a year away, but the campaign is already generating a flood of editorials. Other commentaries this Wednesday dwell on the Russian attacks on Chechnya; this week's 50th anniversary of the People's Republic of China; a surprising result of Turkey's earthquake; warnings that a new virus is infecting the United States; and a new turn in German politics. Now here is ______________ with some excerpts and a closer look in today's Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: One more candidate has dropped out of the race for president, another is officially in, and a third, television commentator Pat Buchanan, is causing a huge controversy with his views on World War Two from his latest book. All of this comes in for attention in Wednesday's Detroit News which headlines its remarks: "(Too) Early Returns."

    VOICE: The presidential derby continues: Bill Bradley moves up, John McCain moves in, Dan Quayle moves out, Pat Buchanan shows signs of moving over. The odds still favor Vice- President Al Gore to be the Democratic nominee and Texas Governor George W. Bush to be the Republican nominee, but both are likely to face a fight. It might be more of a fight if campaign finance and primary rules were not so heavily stacked in favor of front-runners. . The winnowing process has traditionally been a strength of American democracy, giving voters a chance to see how candidates bear up under the considerable rigors of the campaign trail. Now, in the name of "reform," there is a danger we may be returning to the era of smoke-filled rooms, hand-picked candidates - and media coverage that may not always be accurate of fair.

    TEXT: Calling former Vice President Dan Quayle's departure from the republican field "hardly a surprise," Hawaii's Honolulu Star-Bulletin writes:

    VOICE: Most candidates remaining in the race seem ideologically committed to running in defiance of any realistic chance of winning, but it is too early to anoint [Texas Governor George W.] Bush.

    TEXT: Florida's Times-Union in Jacksonville says former candidate Dan Quayle was unfairly treated by what it calls the liberal press.

    VOICE: Another liberal media target also deserves better than he has gotten. Former vice president . Quayle's run for the White detoured to the sidelines Monday when he dropped from the race. . [Mr.] Quayle articulated well on such issues as tax cuts, the need to reduce big government and what is needed to upgrade the nation's moral climate, but could never shake [Editors: get rid of] his media-blown image as a flake [Editors: a person who is conspicuously eccentric, foolish, crazy, or unpredictable] . While [Mr.] Quayle was routinely roasted in the media, current Vice President Al Gore seems to have largely gotten a free pass from the media for bizarre gaffes that surpass [Mr.] Quayle's.

    TEXT: Also drawing comment: the renewed attacks by Russia on Chechnya, in retaliation for a series of terrorist bombings. Newsday on New York's Long Island sums up its view in this editorial headline: "Bombing of Chechnya is Revenge, Not Strategy," while The Washington Post comments under an editorial headline reading: "Russia's Dirty War, Again."

    VOICE: . at first glance it appears that Russia is doing no more in Chechnya than NATO did not long ago in Kosovo: fighting to pursue a valid national policy. .. But things are not so simple in the renewal of a regional war in which Chechen guerrillas humiliated the Russian army and won Chechnya effective independence in 1994- 96. . Victory over the guerrillas apparently has become not just a military goal but an obsession among a Russian command still smarting from earlier defeat. /// OPT /// . There is no good solution to this conflict, but some solutions are better than others, and Moscow does not yet appear to be heading toward them.

    /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: Regarding the 50th anniversary celebrations of the communist revolution in China, Boston's Christian Science Monitor ponders the nation's past and future.

    VOICE: Much of the world may be forgiven if it fails to notice that China celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Communist takeover on October first. The sad truth is that Mao Zedong's disastrous rule and his successors' halting moves to a market economy have left China's impact on the world as more potential than portentous, more promise than promising. In short, the red dragon is stuck in a Communist cave. . Fifty years after the "revolution," let's stop finding excuses for this troubled giant and its authoritarian rulers. Let's see China for what it has been, what it is . and what it can be.

    TEXT: The Washington Times has found what might be one positive result from Turkey's disastrous earthquake last month.

    VOICE: . Turkish Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit is discovering [that] the earthquake which rocked Turkey August 17 moved more than his country's landmass closer to the rest of Europe. The aftermath of the Turkish and Greek earthquakes found the traditionally hostile countries offering one another humanitarian assistance and now the United States and the E-U are showing unusual goodwill toward Turkish partnership as well. /// OPT /// . With European membership now much closer, Turkey will have greater incentive to improve its human rights record. And with the support of the United States, Turkey has a chance to help resolve the Cyprus conflict and expand its own economic future. It's a great opportunity, and U-S and World Bank officials meeting with Ecevit today should work to help Turkey take advantage of it. /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: The unexpected arrival in New York City recently of what scientists now think is The West Nile encephalitis virus has produced this worrying comment in the national daily USA Today. The paper says this should be a warning of worse foreign diseases to come, as more people travel around the world, and travel more quickly.

    VOICE: . the public health community remains poorly prepared for new disease outbreaks. Which is in large part why past outbreaks from Ebola to the Hong Kong chicken flu have whipped the public into a frenzy. . Everyone agrees that deadly diseases someday will emerge. And the C-D-C [U-S Government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] for years has warned that it lacks the resources to protect adequately against potential new threats.

    /// OPT ///

    TEXT: From The Los Angeles Times: comes more pressure on Congress to pay its long-overdue United Nations dues.

    VOICE: Washington began withholding dues and assessment funds from the United Nations 13 years ago in an effort to force internal financial reforms. The pressure achieved its purpose. In recent years the United Nations has cut its spending by 100-million dollars, identified an additional 80-million in possible cuts and eliminated more than one-thousand jobs. Congress plans to adjourn by the end of October. It would be inexcusable for it to leave Washington without dealing honorably and cleanly with the debt issue, with no crippling conditions attached.

    /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: Lastly, The New York Times has some thoughts on the economic reforms being pursued in Germany by Gerhard Schroeder's year-old government, after what the paper says were 12 months of "waffling."

    VOICE: . Chancellor . Schroeder has now embraced economic reality and proposed some mild modifications in Germany's welfare state. But his proposals have been attacked by virtually every other political party in Germany as well as by the traditional wing of his own Social Democrats. . Germany's social benefits now add 40 percent to the cost of each worker - a killer in an economy where creating jobs must be the top priority. In addition, one-quarter of Germany's budget is now spent on debt. This cannot be sustained. . Mr. Schroeder has settled on a wise course, and he must not waver.

    TEXT: On that note, we conclude this sampling of editorial comment from Wednesday's U-S press.
    NEB/ANG/BK 29-Sep-1999 12:28 PM EDT (29-Sep-1999 1628 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article
    Back to Top
    Copyright © 1995-2022 HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network). An HRI Project.
    All Rights Reserved.

    HTML by the HR-Net Group / Hellenic Resources Institute, Inc.
    voa2html v2.03a run on Thursday, 30 September 1999 - 2:45:25 UTC