Browse through our Interesting Nodes for Greek Maritime Issues Read the Convention Relating to the Regime of the Straits (24 July 1923) Read the Convention Relating to the Regime of the Straits (24 July 1923)
HR-Net - Hellenic Resources Network Compact version
Today's Suggestion
Read The "Macedonian Question" (by Maria Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou)
HomeAbout HR-NetNewsWeb SitesDocumentsOnline HelpUsage InformationContact us
Monday, 16 May 2022
 
News
  Latest News (All)
     From Greece
     From Cyprus
     From Europe
     From Balkans
     From Turkey
     From USA
  Announcements
  World Press
  News Archives
Web Sites
  Hosted
  Mirrored
  Interesting Nodes
Documents
  Special Topics
  Treaties, Conventions
  Constitutions
  U.S. Agencies
  Cyprus Problem
  Other
Services
  Personal NewsPaper
  Greek Fonts
  Tools
  F.A.Q.
 

Voice of America, 00-03-08

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] KOSOVO / MITROVICA (L-ONLY) BY STEFAN BOS (BUDAPEST)
  • [02] ALBRIGHT / BOSNIA (S L VERSION) BY KYLE KING (SARAJEVO)
  • [03] ALBRIGHT / BOSNIA (L-UPDATE) BY KYLE KING (BRCKO)
  • [04] ALBRIGHT / BOSNIA (L-ONITER) BY KYLE KING (SARAJEVO)
  • [05] E-U / AUSTRIA (L-ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)
  • [06] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)
  • [07] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] KOSOVO / MITROVICA (L-ONLY) BY STEFAN BOS (BUDAPEST)

    DATE=3/8/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-259995
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Thousands of ethnic Albanian women marched through the ethnically-divided city of Kosovska Mitrovica in Kosovo Wednesday, demanding the return of missing relatives and an end to violence in the area. As Stefan Bos reports from Budapest, the demonstration comes at a moment when NATO officials are increasingly concerned that peacekeeping troops may be unable to prevent further ethnic clashes.

    TEXT: Witnesses say thousands of ethnic Albanian women, carrying photographs of missing relatives, marched through Kosovska Mitrovica demanding justice and an end to violence in the city, which diplomats have called "the most dangerous place in Europe." The silent protest focused on ethnic Albanian claims that many men and women were kidnapped when Serb troops pulled out of Kosovo province last year, after 78 days of NATO air strikes. The demonstration followed an early-morning explosion in Mitrovica, where clashes between Serbs and Albanians on Tuesday wounded at least 16 peacekeepers and more than 20 civilians. Despite the tension, U-N officials continued Wednesday to register Serbs who want to return to their homes in the town's southern, Albanian-dominated section. Barbed wire still separates Mitrovica's Serb and Albanian neighborhoods. French troops have been distributing food to ethnic- Albanian families who recently returned to their homes in a Serb-controlled area (north of the Ibar River). Continuing violence has kept the families confined to their apartments. U-N officials and leaders of the K-FOR peacekeeping force in Kosovo say they intend to unite Mitrovica, whose ethnic divisions have remained frozen since last year. Plans call for the resettlement of thousands of ethnic Serbs and Albanians.

    /// REST OPT ///

    Kosovo's ethnic Albanians are seeking independence from Serb-led Yugoslavia, and NATO officials fear that continued political wrangling will cause further bloodshed. Besides Mitrovica, the estimated 30-thousand NATO soldiers and seven-thousand non-NATO troops in Kosovo have been concerned by increasing movements of ethnic- Albanian refugees into Kosovo from Serbia. The tide of refugees has increased since ethnic Albanian guerrillas from Kosovo entered Serbia and attacked Serb targets in the Presevo Valley, where thousands of ethnic Albanians live. Western diplomats based in Yugoslavia say Serb police obstructed their efforts to monitor the situation in the area this week. (Signed)
    NEB/SJB/WTW 08-Mar-2000 18:39 PM EDT (08-Mar-2000 2339 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] ALBRIGHT / BOSNIA (S L VERSION) BY KYLE KING (SARAJEVO)

    DATE=3/8/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-259957
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: U-S Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has arrived in Bosnia-Herzegovina for talks on ways to bridge lingering animosities between the Muslim, Serb and Croat communities. V-O-A's Kyle King has this report from the Bosnian capital -- the third stop on Ms. Albright's ten-day European visit.

    TEXT: The highlight of Ms. Albright's first day in Bosnia is a visit to the strategic Northern city, Brcko, where she will take part in a ceremony inaugurating its new multi-ethnic governing body. The once-prosperous town was the scene of fierce fighting during the Bosnian war and was in Serb hands when fighting ended in 1995. The city straddles a narrow stretch of land that connects the eastern and western parts of the Bosnian Serb entity called the Republika Srpska. Its location was so important that control was handed over to an international supervisor who ordered it to be demilitarized. Control is being turning to local officials who are expected to be independent of Bosnia's Serb and Muslim-Croat federations. A senior U-S officials hailed the arrangement as an example of progress in bringing the formally-warring factions together but acknowledged there could be lingering problems.

    /// REST OPTIONAL FOR LONG ///

    During a speech in Prague, Tuesday, Ms. Albright called the agreement a symbol of cooperation. She said predictions tension among the town's Serb, Muslim and Croat residents would derail the Bosnian Peace Agreement have been proven wrong. A senior U-S official traveling with the secretary acknowledges not everybody is satisfied with the arrangements in Brcko and it has not been an easy process. Later today, Ms. Albright will meet in Sarajevo with European Union Commissioner Chris Patten to discuss ways to increase cooperation among Bosnia's three ethnic groups. Despite billions of dollars in international aid that has been pumped into Bosnia, some analysts say little has been done to change the communist-style economic system that has insured the dominance of ruling parties. During her two-day visit, Ms. Albright will also hold talks with the Muslim, Serb and Croat opposition leaders and members of the three-way presidency. Thursday, she travels to the Bosnian Serb capital, Banja Luka, for talks with Serb officials and opposition leader Biljana Plavsic. (signed)
    NEB/KBK/WD 08-Mar-2000 05:00 AM EDT (08-Mar-2000 1000 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [03] ALBRIGHT / BOSNIA (L-UPDATE) BY KYLE KING (BRCKO)

    DATE=3/8/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-259984
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:
    /// EDS: Updates 2-259957 New Information Throughout ///

    INTRO: U-S Secretary of State Madeline Albright says the establishment of a multi-ethnic government in the strategic Bosnian city of Brcko can be a model for the country and the entire region. The secretary was in the northern Bosnian city to help inaugurate its new governing system - which will try to overcome lingering animosity between Muslims, Serbs and Croats. V-O-A's Kyle King has this report from Brcko.

    TEXT: Secretary of State Albright flew to Brcko by helicopter so she could join international officials who formally inaugurated the new legal system that outlines how the strategic district will be administered. Many Serbs have bitterly resisted their loss of control in Brcko, which straddles a narrow stretch of land connecting the eastern and western parts of Bosnia's Serb Republic. Secretary of State Albright acknowledged that resolving lingering animosities between the Muslims, Serbs and Croats will not be easy. But she called the new governing statute a model for the country.

    /// Albright Act ///

    Today's event clearly shows the direction this country is headed. It is away from division and toward more joined activities, away from bitterness and toward cooperation, away from isolation and toward integration among the communities here and with Europe.

    /// End Act ///

    Brcko's final status has been one of the most difficult issues facing the international community, which appointed a special supervisor to run the area when the Bosnian war ended in 1995. Under the terms of the new statute, Brcko will be a demilitarized district run by its own mayor and elected assembly. Although it remains a part of Bosnia, the new local government will not be directly responsible to either the Serb or Muslim-Croat Federation that make up Bosnia. During her visit, the secretary also announced the United States would supply two-million dollars to help convert military facilities in Brcko to civilian use. Secretary of State Albright is also using her visit to meet with Bosnian officials and Muslim, Serb and Croat opposition leaders. Following her visit to Brcko, she signed an agreement with Bosnian and Croatian officials that is designed to ensure military assistance requests will be channeled through the Bosnian government. The Secretary is also meeting with European Union Commissioner Chris Patten to discuss ways to increase cooperation among Bosnia's three ethnic groups. Despite billions of dollars in international aid that has been pumped into Bosnia, some analyst say little has been done to change the communist-style system that has ensured the dominance of nationalist ruling parties. Mrs. Albright, who is on the third stop of a 10-day European trip, travels on to the Bosnian-Serb capital of Banja Luka Thursday for talks with officials and opposition leaders. (Signed)
    NEB/KK/ENE-T/JP 08-Mar-2000 15:04 PM EDT (08-Mar-2000 2004 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] ALBRIGHT / BOSNIA (L-ONITER) BY KYLE KING (SARAJEVO)

    DATE=3/8/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-259992
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:
    /// EDS: SECRETARY ALBRIGHT VISITS BANJA LUKA THURSDAY THEN LEAVES BOSNIA FOR BRUSSELS AT ABOUT 1500 UTC ///

    INTRO: Secretary of State Madeleine Albright is wrapping up (has wrapped up) her visit to Bosnia- Herzegovina, where she hailed recent efforts to increase cooperation between Muslims, Croats and Serbs and urged the Sarajevo government to move more quickly on reforms. V-O-A's Kyle King is traveling with the Secretary and files this report.

    TEXT: Secretary of State Albright says next month's municipal elections in Bosnia can be a key step toward the goal of a multi-ethnic society. The Secretary, who scheduled talks with Bosnian Serb, Muslim and Croat officials during her two-day visit, also met with key opposition leaders from the ethnic communities. During a news conference in Sarajevo late Wednesday, Ms. Albright said it was up to elected authorities to improve the country's prospects by cracking down on corruption and acting on fundamental economic reforms.

    /// ALBRIGHT ACT ///

    It's no secret that there remains too much state control in Bosnia, and too much abuse of official firms and offices by political parties. Continued failure to reform will lead to continued hardships for the people here, continued reluctance on the part of outsiders to invest and continued delays in developing Bosnia's economy.

    /// END ACT ///

    Analysts say that despite a flood of international aid to the country, almost nothing has been done to reform a system that allows political leaders to remain in power by heaping favors on their supporters. During her visit, Ms. Albright hailed the progress that has been made by the international community in the bitterly-contested northern city of Brcko, where a new governing system was installed on Wednesday. The Secretary cited the creation of a multi-ethnic government in Brcko as an example for the rest of the country and the region. She said it was up to local officials to adhere to the new governing statute in the once-Serb-held town, which has been ruled by an international supervisor since the war ended in 1995. During her visit, the Secretary announced the United States would supply two-million dollars to help convert military facilities in Brcko to civilian uses. She also signed an agreement with Bosnian and Croatian officials designed to ensure that all requests for military assistance are channeled through the Bosnian government. Five years after the end of Bosnia's bloody, three- year war, relations between the country's Serb Republic and its Muslim-Croat Federation remain strained. Western officials are hoping next month's municipal elections will help loosen the grip of nationalist parties that continue to dominate the political system. The final stop on Ms. Albright's 10-day European tour will be Brussels, where she will meet with NATO Secretary-General George Robertson and European Union officials, for talks likely to focus on Kosovo. (Signed)
    NEB/KBK/WTW 08-Mar-2000 17:08 PM EDT (08-Mar-2000 2208 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] E-U / AUSTRIA (L-ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)

    DATE=3/8/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-259975
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Austrian President Thomas Klestil has urged the European Commission to judge the Austrian government by its actions. Correspondent Ron Pemstein reports from Brussels that the Austrian leader's visit did little to change the political realities of Austria's isolation within the European Union.

    TEXT: Thomas Klestil is one of the few Austrian leaders to be welcomed by the European Commission. He is credited with forcing Freedom Party leader Joerg Haider to sign a declaration committing the new center-right government to European values. Mr. Haider has since resigned as party leader, but that action has not changed the E-U policy to isolate Austria so long as the far-right Freedom Party remains in the government. European Commission President Romano Prodi says through an interpreter, the Commission will deal with Austria as a Union member but it will also defend European values.

    /// PRODI ACT W/ INTERPRETER ///

    /// OPT ///

    The position of a super-national institution such as the Commission is not to isolate a country, but to bind it irrevocably to its values. And, /// END OPT /// President Klestil, we will be inflexible in making sure that the Austrian government respects European principles, but we will also be inflexible in guaranteeing the rights of citizens and companies of Austria because that it is the role of the Commission.

    /// END ACT ///

    The other 14-governments of the European Union have tried to isolate Austria by downgrading high-level contacts with the government.

    /// OPT ///

    For instance, Austrian Chancellor Wolfgang Schuessel will have to travel to Brussels next week to be briefed by Portugal's Prime Minister on the preparations for the Lisbon summit meeting that begins March 23rd. Prime Minister Antonio Guetteres has been traveling to the other E-U capitals for this briefing, but refuses to travel to Vienna because of the sanctions. /// END OPT /// President Klestil, speaking through an interpreter, says it is becoming difficult to separate E-U affairs from bilateral relations.

    /// KLESTIL ACT W/ INTERPRETER ///

    Practice though has shown that because of the very way that E-U member states interlock, bilateral matters and E-U affairs overlap and in fact, in many cases, it is not possible to draw a line between the two. I am quite convinced that it is in the interest of the Commission's own work, to have the full, unlimited cooperation of Austria and that in particular bearing in mind, the big challenges that await us, institutional reform and E-U-enlargement.

    /// END ACT ///

    Commission President Prodi has said the Austrian situation has raised the possibility the European Union will have to take a tough line in the conditions it imposes on countries that want to join the Union. The Freedom Party argued against European Union enlargement in its election campaign, and Mr. Prodi says that raises the possibility of more far-right opposition to enlargement unless strict conditions are enforced. President Prodi says The European Union sanctions against Austria are also meant to warn applicant candidates against allowing extremist parties in their future governments.

    /// PRODI ACT W/ INTERPRETER ///

    The decision, which we have endorsed, is a message not only to Austria but to all of Europe, and it is within the context of looking to a Europe with 28-members. /// OPT /// You have got to bear in mind when you think of what enlargement will involve, then every month there is going to be an election of considerable political significance. So we are not just talking about Austria here, but we are talking about guaranteeing the life of this Union and the values which President Klestil has said, is shared by an absolute majority in Austria. /// END OPT ///

    /// END ACT ///

    President Klestil says the Austrian people still support the European Union, but they do not understand gestures such as the one Belgium's foreign minister has made to discourage Belgians from skiing in Austria. Despite the Austrian President's visit to the European Commission, those bilateral gestures of disapproval are likely to continue. (SIGNED)
    NEB/RP/GE/RAE 08-Mar-2000 11:02 AM EDT (08-Mar-2000 1602 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [06] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)

    DATE=3/8/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-259991
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: U-S stock prices were up today (Wednesday). But gains were limited following Tuesday's big sell- off which shaved 374 points off the Dow Jones Industrials. V-O-A correspondent Elaine Johanson reports from New York:

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 60 points, less than one percent, closing at 98-hundred- 56. Despite the bounce, analysts say the "blue-chip" index associated now with the so-called "old economy" - continues to be haunted by an environment of rising interest rates. Investors worry that higher rates will cut into corporate profits. The Standard and Poor's 500 index rose 11 points. Meanwhile, the technology-weighted Nasdaq composite was down most of the day but rebounded for a one percent gain. Analysts attributed the reversal of fortune - albeit a modest one for the "blue-chips" - partly to a three- dollar a barrel drop in crude oil prices.

    /// BEGIN OPT ///

    Analyst Art Cashin says signals from oil producers of a production increase gave the market a break from recent selling pressure:

    /// CASHIN ACT ///

    The bears (market pessimists) have slipped on an oil slick here. Oil has come in a little bit. The transports have bounced back. And that's allowed some breathing room in both the Dow Jones and in the Nasdaq.

    /// END ACT ///

    /// END OPT ///

    But nothing is very clear about today's market. It has shown a lot of inconsistency in recent weeks, as uncertainty continues over both the price of oil and interest rates.

    /// REST OPT ///

    Shares of Proctor and Gamble edged down a little more over five percent. They lost about one-third of their market value Tuesday, after the leading U-S maker of household goods said its profits for the current quarter would fall far below expectations. Proctor and Gamble is one of the 30 Dow stocks. It precipitated Tuesday's big slide. (Signed) NEB/EJ/LSF/gm 08-Mar-2000 16:38 PM EDT (08-Mar-2000 2138 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [07] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=3/8/2000
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-11717
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: Wednesday's editorial pages in the United States are filled with comment on the Super Tuesday presidential primary election returns. Both Texas Governor George W. Bush and Vice President Al Gore won big, casting doubts that either Democrat Bill Bradley or Republican John McCain will continue their campaigns. Other topics include more thoughts on the Middle East peace process, President Clinton's decision to visit Pakistan on his forthcoming sub-continent trip and dealing with China on trade and human rights. Now, here is _________ with a closer look in today's Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: First to the election results and the general impression in most editorials that the predicted front-runners -- Governor Bush and Vice President Gore are now the all-but-certain candidates in the general election. The New York Times notes:

    VOICE: The importance of the voting ... could be seen as both Mr. Bush and Mr. Gore issued gracious compliments to the men they defeated and immediately turned their sights on each other. Given the likelihood that the vice president will be running against the son of the man defeated by President Clinton in 1992, it was interesting that both his and Mr. Bush's speeches looked back as well as forward.

    TEXT: In defeat, Arizona Senator John McCain, who won four New England states, got this assessment from The Hartford [Connecticut] Courant.

    VOICE: Though John McCain's bid for the Republican presidential nomination might not survive Super Tuesday's round of primaries, one thing is for certain: The Arizona senator's reform message resonated in ... much of ... New England. ... Mr. McCain has been a breath of fresh air in American politics. ... [His] character and the lodestones of his message -- cleaning up the rotten campaign finance system and rejecting the intolerance shown by many leaders of the religious right -- have appealed ... to moderates everywhere ...

    TEXT: In his home state of Texas, Governor Bush's victories draw this opinion from The Dallas Morning News.

    VOICE: Governor Bush must especially work fast to capture the independents who have so strongly backed Senator McCain. N-B-C News reported Tuesday that 40 percent of Mr. McCain's supporters plan to vote for Al Gore in November. Governor Bush holds an ace, however, with his strong centrist record as governor. His progressive stands on education and social inclusion should play well with independents and "McCain Republicans."

    TEXT: In case anyone still has doubts that the two major candidates have already been chosen, The Atlanta Journal wants to set the record straight.

    VOICE: So now we get down to the heart of the matter -- the real campaign between two major parties with two very different visions of what America is and how it should be governed. ... the voting in Super Tuesday's elections has effectively set the stage for the political combat that will take us to Election Day in November.

    TEXT: Turning to international affairs, and the Middle East first, The Boston Globe sees an irony in complaints from its neighbors about Israel's newly reaffirmed decision to pull out of Southern Lebanon by July.

    VOICE: Lebanese and Syrian officials had long lamented Israel's 18-year-year occupation of southern Lebanon, demanding that Israel withdraw unconditionally, in conformity with United Nations resolutions. Now that Israel has stated its readiness to stage such a withdrawal, the Syrian regime of Hafez Assad and its vassals in Beirut are complaining that a unilateral Israeli restoration of Lebanon's territorial integrity would be a dirty trick.

    TEXT: The Globe concludes that complete freedom and independence for Lebanon will require not only the Israeli withdrawal, but also the pull-out of Syria's 40-thousand troops as well. On New York's Long Island, Newsday calls the Israeli decision a bold step, but wonders whether "[Mr.] Barak's Gamble [will] Bring Syria to the Peace Table?" After weeks of consideration, President Clinton has decided to include a stop in Pakistan on his forthcoming trip to the sub-continent, drawing this warning to Islamabad from The New York Times.

    VOICE: President Clinton's decision ... should not be seen as an American endorsement of General Pervez Musharraf, that country's military ruler. Since seizing power last October, General Musharraf has ignored Washington's concerns in three vital areas. He refuses to cut links with international terrorist groups, resists treaty commitments to curb Pakistan's nuclear weapons program and declines to take steps toward restoring democratic rule. For these reasons, Mr. Clinton would have done better to skip Pakistan, limiting his visit to India and Bangladesh.

    TEXT: In the Balkans, the on-going violence in the Kosovo city of Mitrovica, and elsewhere, suggests to Honolulu's Star-Bulletin in Tuesday afternoon's edition, that Washington's European allies should "assume a larger share of the peacekeeping burden."

    /// BEGIN OPT ///

    VOICE: The continuing tensions should call attention to U-S policy in Kosovo and Bosnia and the dangers of being caught in another quagmire. John ... Hulsman, an analyst with the conservative Heritage Foundation, argues that the United States has borne an excessive share of the burden of the NATO operation in Kosovo. He maintains that current commitments constitute a drain that is damaging U-S military readiness to fight in other situations. ... Having shouldered most of the burden for the bombing campaign, the United States should now let its allies deal with the problems of peacekeeping, [Mr.] Hulsman says. That makes sense ...

    /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: Moving on to Asian affairs, the yearly Congressional debate over granting China normal trading status is complicated by that nation's latest saber rattling (threats) against Taiwan, and a renewed human rights crackdown. However, The Detroit [Michigan] Free Press asserts:

    VOICE: Against this backdrop, [Mr.] Clinton is asking Congress not only to renew China's trading status but to make it permanent, avoiding the annual battle and smoothing the way for China's membership in the World Trade Organization. It doesn't minimize the seriousness of China's sins to say ... the president has it right.

    TEXT: The Dallas [Texas] Morning News, meanwhile, is concerned with international issues closer to home. It joins environmentalists in celebrating a Mexican government decision not to allow construction of a Japanese-owned salt plant near a breeding ground for Grey whales in Baja California. The newspaper credits the power of the increasingly global economy, and worldwide protests, in aiding the decision.

    VOICE: Environmentalists had complained that the proposed salt works in a pristine desert lagoon would harm a [threatened] species of whale that uses the lagoon to [have its calves]. An exhaustive study had indicated no danger to the whales. But Mr. Zedillo canceled the project anyway on the grounds that the project would "modify the landscape of the lagoon" and thereby harm tourism.

    TEXT: Still in the Western Hemisphere, the return to Chile of that nation's former dictator, General Augusto Pinochet, draws this response from the Houston [Texas] Chronicle.

    VOICE: General ... Pinochet ...returned to his country a frail and much diminished figure after being detained in Britain for almost a year-and- a-half. His formal welcome by Chile's military, however, indicates that the anti-democratic flames [General] Pinochet once fanned remain bright embers. Chile has not fully recovered from the trauma of [General] Pinochet's rule. ... Unfortunately, Chile's military has shown that it does not yet accept the essential democratic principle of civilian control of the armed forces.

    TEXT: Wednesday's St. Petersburg [Florida] Times is upset that the Immigration and Naturalization Service continues to treat the children of illegal immigrants caught trying to enter this country, as criminals. The newspaper points out that the children are not responsible for their parents' actions.

    VOICE: The Immigration and Naturalization Service says children detained by the agency must be moved to a safe, kid-friendly environment within 72 hours of their initial detention, unless they are suspected criminals or considered a flight risk. Advocates for these children say that rule rarely is enforced. Instead, immigrant children typically are separated from their loved ones and locked in juvenile detention facilities, often before the I-N-S has a chance to determine the family's status.

    /// BEGIN OPT ///

    TEXT: Finally, on the controversial topic of global warming and the greenhouse gases that allegedly are worsening it, The St. Louis [Missouri] Post-Dispatch, is upset. The paper says "the nation that spews the most greenhouse gases is taking small steps where a giant leap for mankind is required" to deal with the problem. And the newspaper says there is plenty of blame to go around.

    VOICE: President Bill Clinton won't or can't make the leap to enact truly meaningful legislation, encouraging serious development of non-fossil fuels or reforming the "light-truck" mileage standards of S-U-Vs [Editors: sports utility vehicles] which now account for 40 percent of all new cars. Members of Congress, beholden to campaign contributors, also will not take the leap to attack a problem that is not yet burdensome in day-to-day life. As sprawl widens around St. Louis and Kansas City, the Missouri legislature will not take the leap to reform the gas tax so some of it could be spent on mass transit. Few commuters take the leap to organize car pools. Even fewer decide to move closer to work in small dwellings that are easier to heat and cool.

    /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: That assessment concludes this sampling of editorial comment from Wednesday's U-S press.
    NEB/ANG/JP 08-Mar-2000 11:34 AM EDT (08-Mar-2000 1634 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article
    Back to Top
    Copyright © 1995-2022 HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network). An HRI Project.
    All Rights Reserved.

    HTML by the HR-Net Group / Hellenic Resources Institute, Inc.
    voa2html v2.03a run on Thursday, 9 March 2000 - 2:03:47 UTC