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Voice of America, 00-04-04

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] KOSOVO - INJURIES (S-ONLY) BY JIM RANDLE (PENTAGON)
  • [02] ROBERTSON - NATO (L-ONLY) BY PENNY DIXON (WASHINGTON)
  • [03] AFRICA / EUROPE SUMMIT (L) BY SCOTT BOBB (CAIRO)
  • [04] EUROPE-LIBYA (L-ONLY) BY LISA BRYANT (CAIRO)
  • [05] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)
  • [06] TUESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY NEAL LAVON (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] KOSOVO - INJURIES (S-ONLY) BY JIM RANDLE (PENTAGON)

    DATE=4/4/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-260954
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Clashes between KFOR troops (Kosovo Protection Forces) and civilians injured at least 13 people, including 11 Americans in Kosovo, Tuesday. V-O-A's Jim Randle reports, the disturbance broke out as troops seized some weapons.

    TEXT: Soldiers from Poland and the United States found two hand grenades in a private home in the village of Sevce (prono: sev-itch). When the troops arrested a person in connection with the illegal weapons, a crowd of about 150 people surrounded the house and blocked the soldiers' exit. Troops from the NATO-led international force called for help, and reinforcements moved to disperse the crowd. Another Polish unit tried to keep hundreds of ethnic Serbs from a nearby village from joining the disturbance. There have been a number of clashes between the majority ethnic Albanians, the shrinking Serb population and KFOR peacekeeping troops in recent weeks, sparking calls for more police and troops. (Signed)
    NEB/PT 04-Apr-2000 17:55 PM EDT (04-Apr-2000 2155 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [02] ROBERTSON - NATO (L-ONLY) BY PENNY DIXON (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=4/4/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-260946
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: NATO Secretary General George Robertson says Russia has no veto on the subject of NATO expansion. V-O-A's Penny Dixon reports from Washington, where Mr. Robertson's shared with reporters his vision for the alliance's future.

    TEXT: NATO's chief says relations with Russia are getting back on track after the freeze caused by the alliance's bombing campaign in Yugoslavia a year ago. Mr. Robertson says that during his visit to Russia a few weeks ago Russian President Vladimir Putin told him he wants Russia to be part of the new Europe. But the NATO Secretary General says the improvement in relations does not extend to giving Russia a say in which countries can be considered for NATO expansion.

    /// FIRST ROBERTSON ACT ///

    Russia has no veto on who's going to join NATO. That will be a decision taken by the free alliance, free countries. Sovereign countries have the right to make their own decisions about their own security matters.

    /// END ACT ///

    Nine countries have applied for membership in NATO: Albania, Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia. Russia opposes membership for the three Baltic states. NATO will decide on the admission of new members at its summit in 2002. Mr. Robertson spoke at the National Press Club in Washington on NATO's 51st anniversary. He says the alliance's new role is one reason its growth must be carefully considered:

    /// SECOND ROBERTSON ACT ///

    We've got to be very careful in NATO about enlargement because NATO is a military alliance, a defense alliance, but also now a bigger alliance designed for shaping the peace in Europe.

    /// END ACT ///

    The NATO Secretary General says the presence of former Warsaw Pact countries in the alliance is proof that with the end of the Cold War, Europe is drawing closer together:

    /// THIRD ROBERTSON ACT ///

    Through its own enlargement process, NATO is erasing the dividing lines in Europe and providing a continuing incentive for aspiring members to put their own house in order.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Robertson says the security created by NATO is at the root of Europe's current prosperity. (Signed) NEB/PCD/ENE/gm 04-Apr-2000 16:34 PM EDT (04-Apr-2000 2034 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [03] AFRICA / EUROPE SUMMIT (L) BY SCOTT BOBB (CAIRO)

    DATE=4/4/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-260950
    CONTENT=
    INTERNET=YES

    INTRO: Leaders of 67 countries in Africa and Europe have concluded a two-day summit in Egypt by pledging to work together to prevent new conflicts in Africa and reduce poverty there by 50 percent in 15 years. Correspondent Scott Bobb reports from Cairo that European delegates agreed to make greater efforts to reduce Africa's external debt and two countries, France and Germany, during the summit announced additional debt forgiveness plans.

    TEXT: African and European leaders ended the summit expressing satisfaction over their work and saying it has contributed to better understanding of their positions on the issues. African leaders accepted part of the blame for their weak record of governance since independence. Algeria's President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, speaking for Africa as Chairman of the Organization of African Unity, said the responsibilities of Africans towards themselves are greater than the responsibilities of others towards them.

    ///BOUTEFLIKA ACT. IN FRENCH///

    President Bouteflika told reporters as the summit ended that Africa must first put order in its own house before seeking assistance from abroad. However, African leaders urged European leaders to accept greater responsibility for their governments' contribution to many of Africa's problems. Portugal's Prime Minister Antonio Gueterres, speaking for Europe as head of the rotating presidency of the European Union, said it is impossible to deny that colonialism created enormous problems in Africa.

    ///GUETERRES ACT.///

    But we were not here in this summit to cure those wounds. We were here to prepare our future. And of course the history of our links, for the good and for the bad, has created an obligation to work together.

    ///END ACT.///

    European leaders pledged greater efforts to resolve these problems and both sides pledged to work towards what was called a new strategic dimension to the global partnership between Africa and Europe.

    ///REST OPT.///

    The subject of debt forgiveness was the most contentious, with African delegates arguing for a complete elimination of the continent's 350 billion dollar foreign debt. European delegates argued the topic is complex because the debt is owed to many different institutions. But they agreed to seek new ways to ease the burden. Algerian President Bouteflika said Europe needs time to re-examine its position on the debt. He said Africans presented their problems and were listened to attentively. The President said a certain number of measures were announced and others will come later.

    ///BOUTEFLIKA ACT.///

    President Bouteflika said the Cairo summit was neither a beginning, nor an end. He said the struggle between rich and poor nations is as old as the world. But, he said, a new phase has begun of better understanding and solidarity between political leaders and their people. (Signed)
    NEB/SB/PT 04-Apr-2000 17:23 PM EDT (04-Apr-2000 2123 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] EUROPE-LIBYA (L-ONLY) BY LISA BRYANT (CAIRO)

    DATE=4/4/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-260948
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:
    /// Re-running w/change "officials" to "Presidents" in last graph ///

    INTRO: The Euro-African summit that came to a close in Cairo on Tuesday marked a diplomatic debut of sorts for Libyan President Moammar Gadhafi, whose country faced U-N sanctions until last year. From Cairo, Lisa Bryant reports that a number of European diplomats say they can do business with President Gadhafi, despite his latest rhetoric against the West.

    TEXT: With his flowing robes and his guest quarters inside a massive tent in Cairo, President Gadhafi was definitely the star attraction at a summit between European and African leaders. Heads of state from Spain, Italy, Ireland and German were among those who met with Libyan leader. And European Commission President Romano Prodi, who traveled to Libya last year, did not rule out a future visit by Mr. Gadhafi to Europe. But the Libyan president's speech to leaders attending the Cairo summit met with less success. In his address, Mr. Gadhafi harshly criticized European countries for what he said has been an attitude of racism and neo-colonialism toward Africa. Africa needs food and medicine, Mr. Gadhafi said. It does not need lessons in democracy. But a number of European officials reacted to the Libyan leader's speech with a diplomatic shrug. Fernando Neves, spokesman for the president of the European Union, said few leaders were surprised by Mr. Gadhafi's address.

    /// NEVES ACT ///

    We are used to Mr. Gadhafi's style, and I think that President [Abdelaziz] Bouteflika [of Algeria] interpreted very well the feeling of the audience, thanking Mr. Gadhafi to open his cards and share his deep feelings with the other members of the summit.

    /// END ACT ///

    Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Guterres, the current president of the European Union, said Mr. Gadhafi's criticism of Europe's colonial legacy in Africa was absolutely correct. But, Mr. Guterres said, the discourse between Africa and Europe should be about the future, not the past. French President Jacques Chirac said that given the suspension of U-N sanctions on Libya, it was completely natural that Mr. Gadhafi should attend a meeting between European and African heads of state.
    /// CHIRAC ACT -- IN FRENCH - ESTABLISH AND FADE ///
    Mr. Chirac refused to comment specifically on France's reaction to the Libyan leader. But French Minister of Industry, Christian Pierret, travels to Tripoli shortly on what will be the first visit by a French minister to Libya in almost a decade. Diplomats say Mr. Gadhafi's role as an elder statesman in Africa has played well in Europe. The Libyan leader has hosted a number of African heads of state, and volunteered to mediate in disputes among African countries. That happened in Cairo as well, when Libyan, Egyptian and Sudanese Presidents conferred on ways of ending a protracted civil war in Sudan. (SIGNED)
    NEB/LB/JP 04-Apr-2000 17:59 PM EDT (04-Apr-2000 2159 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)

    DATE=4/4/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-260951
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Wall Street had a scare today (Tuesday) for about one hour, as panic selling in technology sent all stock averages plunging wildly. U-S stock prices eventually bounced back but closed lower across the board. VOA correspondent Elaine Johanson reports from New York:

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 57 points, closing at 11-thousand-164. But it had plunged more than 500 points, over four percent, before climbing back after a mid-day selling frenzy. The technology-weighted Nasdaq composite, which took huge losses Monday, dropped nearly 600 points, another 13 percent, before bouncing back dramatically. It closed down, but only 75 points - a loss of less than two percent. Trading in the Nasdaq market hit a record two-point- eight billion shares. The Standard and Poor's 500 index closed down 11 points - less than one percent.

    ///BEGIN OPT///

    Analyst Larry Wachtel, from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, called it an overdue correction for technology and the Nasdaq market:

    ///WACHTEL ACT///

    This is a traditional culmination of an excess. The Nasdaq moved to excess - 85 percent last year, 25 percent as of March 10th. It had to be corrected. And so, the process begins.

    ///END ACT///

    ///END OPT///

    Microsoft shares held up relatively well, losing another three to four percent. On Monday, a negative anti-trust ruling precipitated a 15 percent drop in the software giant's market value.

    ///REST OPT///

    Al Kugel, investment strategist with the Stein Roe and Farnham brokerage firm, says Microsoft may have opened the floodgates for the flight from technology. But he says investors already were on their way out - whether for immediate profit or in search of bargains elsewhere:

    ///KUGEL ACT///

    And you've got a group here that's been leading the market pretty much for a couple of years. There's a lot of short-term gains in the trading profits in those stocks. And I think maybe with some of the air (excess) and some of the prices, what you needed was a trigger to let some of it out. I think we're going to see a run now where money is going to seep out of the tech stocks and into other types of growth stocks.

    ///END ACT///

    The latest on the U-S economy shows the leading indicators down three-tenths of one percent in February, the biggest drop in four years. Analysts say this could mean the five central bank credit tightenings since last June are, in effect, slowing the economy down. The index of economic indicators is a measure of future growth. NEB/NY/EJ/LSF/ENE/PT 04-Apr-2000 17:30 PM EDT (04-Apr-2000 2130 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [06] TUESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY NEAL LAVON (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=4/4/2000
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-11759
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-0112
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: Yesterday's [April 3] ruling against the software giant Microsoft and the ongoing drama of six- year-old Elian Gonzalez dominate the nation's editorial pages on Tuesday [April 4]. Now, for a closer look and some excerpts, here is ____________with today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: The New York Times applauded Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's decision that Microsoft had violated U-S anti-trust laws. The Times noted:

    VOICE:...Microsoft illegally used its monopoly over [the computer operating system] Windows to get most consumers to use its browser, the software that connects computers to the Internet, rather than Netscape's...so Microsoft's decision to incorporate its browser in Windows and to prohibit manufacturers from substituting anyone else's browser was designed not to benefit consumers, the ultimate test of antitrust doctrine, but to insulate Windows from competitive challenge. That, Judge Jackson ruled, was a violation of anti-trust laws.

    TEXT: But the Washington Times says Microsoft helped computer consumers by giving away its browser instead of charging for it, something that Judge Jackson previously admitted.

    VOICE:...Microsoft gave away its browser for free...by providing [the browser] at no extra cost. [Judge Jackson] said, Microsoft increased public familiarity with the software and reduced the cost to consumers of obtaining it. But such benefits mattered less to Judge Jackson, and the Department of Justice officials who brought the anti-trust suit against Microsoft, than the "crimes" it committed while providing such aid to consumers.

    TEXT: The case of Elian Gonzalez continues, and may be headed towards resolution. Elian is the six year-old Cuban boy who was rescued at sea trying to reach the United States. His mother drowned in the attempt and now Fidel Castro and Elian's father, who lives in Cuba, want the boy returned while Elian's relatives in Miami attempt to keep him in the United States. The Orlando Sentinel believes, like the Clinton Administration, that Elian should be returned.

    VOICE:...Barring abuse or neglect, a child belongs with his parents, and Elian has just one-his father, by all accounts a loving and attentive dad. And if Elian's father chooses to take his son back to his native Cuba, he should be free to do so.

    TEXT: While the New York Daily News agrees with the idea of sending Elian back, it nevertheless disagrees with Vice President Gore's recent proposal to grant Elian permanent custody in the United States while the case is decided in the courts.

    VOICE:...Al Gore the candidate has pushed aside Al Gore, the vice president. He has put potential votes before sound policy. Throwing support to an ill- advised crusade to have Congress grant the Cuban child permanent residency supports bad law and adds one more player to the gang ready to exploit the plight of a little boy for political gain.

    TEXT: And finally, the question over whether British Prime Minister Tony Blair should take parental leave to care for his next child which is due late next month. The Prime Minister's wife, Cherie, made a public request that he stay at home and take care of the child. So far, the Prime Minister has been noncommittal, but unenthusiastic about the idea. The Roanoke Times encourages him to take the parental leave.

    VOICE:...Have you lost it, luv? This is a no-brainer. With one word - yes - you can get your wife off your case, score political points with all the Rugby moms and the Queen Mum herself, strike a blow for gender equity, and prove to the world that real men do, too, change diapers.

    TEXT: But the Washington Times notes that Mr. Blair's hesitancy to take parental leave only reflects the hypocrisy of his government's social policies.

    VOICE: Sounds terribly familiar, doesn't it? A liberal government pushing ever more intrusive laws and regulations on the population that it does not want to live by itself. Mr. Blair should do the honorable thing, stay at home, listen to his wife, and console himself that at least he can keep in touch with the office by e-mail. Britain may well be the better off for it.

    TEXT: And with that, we close this edition of the U-S Editorial Digest.
    NEB/NL/RAE 04-Apr-2000 11:21 AM EDT (04-Apr-2000 1521 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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