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Voice of America, 00-04-07

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] BOSNIA WAR CRIMES (L-ONLY) BY LAUREN COMITEAU (THE HAGUE)
  • [02] FRIDAY'S EDITORIALS BY JON TKACH (WASHINGTON)
  • [03] FRIDAY'S EDITORIALS BY JON TKACH (WASHINGTON)
  • [04] KOSOVO CONFERENCE (L-ONLY) BY STEFAN BOS (BUDAPEST)
  • [05] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)
  • [06] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)
  • [07] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)
  • [08] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)
  • [09] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)
  • [10] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA EUROPE (S-2ND UPDATE) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)

  • [01] BOSNIA WAR CRIMES (L-ONLY) BY LAUREN COMITEAU (THE HAGUE)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261044
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: In his first appearance before the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal, former Bosnian Serb political leader Momcilo Krajisnik pleaded not guilty to all the charges against him. Prosecutors are holding him responsible as an architect of the slaughter and ethnic cleansing of non-Serbs during the early years of the Bosnian conflict. Lauren Comiteau reports from The Hague.

    TEXT: After a dramatic week that began with the arrest of Momcilo Krajisnik, Friday's court proceedings were no-nonsense and quick. It took little over 30 minutes for Mr. Krajisnik to plead not guilty to all nine counts against him. Prosecutors say the Bosnian Serb leader was responsible for the murder and deportation of thousands of non-Serbs from Bosnia in 1991 and 1992. Mr. Krajisnik asked to make a statement on his own behalf, a request Judge Richard May denied. Judge May said he could do that when his trial begins. The only words he wanted to hear from the defendant this morning were guilty or not guilty.

    /// MAY ACT ///

    Count One...genocide...how do you plead? Krajisnik: Nisam Kriv.

    /// END ACT ///

    Momcilo Krajisnik pleaded not guilty to the other charges as well. They include everything in this Tribunal's statute, from persecution and extermination to deportation. Defense lawyer Igor Pantelic told reporters that as former president of the Bosnian Serb assembly, his client was not part of the chain of command.

    /// PANTELIC ACT ///

    It's absolutely unfounded, vague, fabricated. It's politically motivated. Not by accident that this indictment was served prior to these days prior to local elections.

    /// END ACT ///

    Municipal elections will be held Saturday throughout Bosnia. Mr. Pantelic says his client is in good mental and physical shape, and that the trial will be a very interesting one. No date has been set yet, but prosecutors want Momcilo Krajisnik to be tried with Bosnian Serb wartime leader Radovan Karadzic - whom they also want NATO-troops to arrest. (Signed)
    NEB/LC/GE/KL 07-Apr-2000 07:58 AM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1158 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] FRIDAY'S EDITORIALS BY JON TKACH (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=BACKGROUND REPORT
    NUMBER=6-11765
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Editorial writers at American newspapers continue to debate the fate of 6-year-old Cuban exile Elian Gonzalez, following the arrival of his father in the United States. Other topics include trade relations with China, the court ruling that software giant Microsoft is guilty and the upcoming elections in Peru. For a closer look and some excerpts, here is ___________ with today's Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: An international custody fight over a 6-year old Cuban boy has intensified over the past few days. His father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez, arrived in the United States Thursday, hoping to be reunited with his son, and eventually to return with the boy to Cuba. But Elian's relatives in Miami, who have looked after the boy since he was found off the Florida coast, continue to resist the boy's return. The Oklahoman newspaper wonders whether Mr. Gonzalez's wishes are really his own -- or the wishes of Cuban leader Fidel Castro.

    VOICE: Although the Clinton administration- endorsed plan is for the father to be with his son in the U-S while the court system sorts out Elian's permanent custody status, it's just as likely the elder Gonzalez will return home right away -- with the boy -- and no one will know whether it was a voluntary decision. Indeed, Juan Miguel Gonzalez may be in the land of the free, but he most certainly isn't free with a phalanx of Castro's handlers watching every move and listening to every word. His arrival statement was rhetorical to the point of suggesting someone else -- maybe Castro himself -- wrote it for him. ... It's not as simple as returning Elian to his dad. Unless Juan Miguel can freely decide where he wants to raise Elian and the rest of his family, re-uniting them actually will be returning a little boy, whose mother died trying to bring him to freedom, to Fidel Castro.

    TEXT: But the San Francisco Chronicle says the bonds between father and son should be the first priority:

    VOICE: Enough of the speculation about whether the father is being used by ... Fidel Castro. Even if he is -- and some of his statements [Thursday] did betray a hint of propaganda -- the fact of the matter is that he has asked for custody of his child, and the courts have affirmed his right to it. ... There should be no need for federal agents to rush into the relatives' house to seize Elian by force. Such a confrontation would only add to the trauma of a boy who lost his mother at sea. Hopefully, the father's presence in this country will finally unleash an even more powerful force in Miami: the universal human respect for parent- child bonds.

    TEXT: Another fight that has been brewing in the United States is over a vote on granting permanent normal trading relations to China. The Dallas Morning News says Congress needs to hurry up and get it done.

    VOICE: If the House rejects permanent normal trade relations, China would enter the World Trade Organization without having to open its market to the United States. In short, China would join the world trade body but the United States would not benefit. Furthermore, overall relations with the Asian power would be greatly harmed.

    TEXT: U-S editorial writers also took notice of the upcoming Peruvian elections. The Los Angeles Times says the process there so far has been a "masquerade."

    VOICE: As the candidates make their promises on the campaign trail in Peru, it's tempting to believe that democracy is blooming there. But the illusion is thin. In seeking an unprecedented third term, President Alberto Fujimori has made a mockery of both democracy and the campaign process. ... Despite the obstacles, including an incumbent who uses almost every dirty trick conceivable, voters could redress the balance. In Alejandro Toledo -- a candidate of Indian heritage who went from shoeshine boy to business school professor -- there's a possibility that [Mr.] Fujimori has met his match.

    TEXT: The Houston Chronicle says the United States should follow threats with action if the voting proves unfair:

    VOICE: The United States has a marked interest in assisting Peruvians in putting on fair and free elections. And the State Department is backing up its rhetoric on the subject with threats of sanctions on Peru. That's important because America has a legitimate concern for democracy in the region. As goes Peru's democracy, so might go democracies in neighboring Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela.

    TEXT: A judge's ruling earlier this week against Microsoft Corporation, the software maker that until recently was the world's biggest company, is still being debated. Microsoft was found guilty of antitrust violations, but it will be some time before the court decides what penalties to assess. Microsoft's founder, Bill Gates, plans to appeal the decision, but The Hartford Courant (in Connecticut) is urging him to end the court battle now.

    VOICE: Mr. Gates's decision to appeal is likely to prolong uncertainty at Microsoft and in the computer market, which today impacts many aspects of everyday life. It could be a year or more before the case works its way through the federal appeals courts and, probably, the U-S Supreme Court. ... Mr. Gates would be well- advised to resume talks with the Justice Department with the intention of reaching a settlement. Judge Jackson's elucidation of the evidence and the law and the clarity of his logic are impressive. Microsoft spared no resources to defend itself. But it lost. Mr. Gates's right of appeal is indisputable. The wisdom of doing so is questionable.

    TEXT: The Chicago Tribune is more critical of the judge's ruling.

    VOICE: Forgive consumers if they haven't uncorked the champagne yet. Given a choice of oppressive thumbs, many would probably opt for Microsoft, the monopolist, over those of the Justice Department // OPT // and 19 state attorneys general squabbling among themselves about just what ought to be bundled into the next generation desktop. // END OPT // ... Who's cheering this government victory? ... The lawyers, for sure. The primary case against Microsoft will keep batteries of them engaged for months, if not years, and the effective guilty verdict of Microsoft is already spurring a cascade of private damage suits. So all those resources that might have gone into innovating will go into litigating instead.

    TEXT: On that note, we end this look at editorial pages in Friday's U-S press.
    NEB/JON/WTW 07-Apr-2000 11:19 AM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1519 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [03] FRIDAY'S EDITORIALS BY JON TKACH (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=BACKGROUND REPORT
    NUMBER=6-11765
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Editorial writers at American newspapers continue to debate the fate of 6-year-old Cuban exile Elian Gonzalez, following the arrival of his father in the United States. Other topics include trade relations with China, the court ruling that software giant Microsoft is guilty and the upcoming elections in Peru. For a closer look and some excerpts, here is ___________ with today's Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: An international custody fight over a 6-year old Cuban boy has intensified over the past few days. His father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez, arrived in the United States Thursday, hoping to be reunited with his son, and eventually to return with the boy to Cuba. But Elian's relatives in Miami, who have looked after the boy since he was found off the Florida coast, continue to resist the boy's return. The Oklahoman newspaper wonders whether Mr. Gonzalez's wishes are really his own -- or the wishes of Cuban leader Fidel Castro.

    VOICE: Although the Clinton administration- endorsed plan is for the father to be with his son in the U-S while the court system sorts out Elian's permanent custody status, it's just as likely the elder Gonzalez will return home right away -- with the boy -- and no one will know whether it was a voluntary decision. Indeed, Juan Miguel Gonzalez may be in the land of the free, but he most certainly isn't free with a phalanx of Castro's handlers watching every move and listening to every word. His arrival statement was rhetorical to the point of suggesting someone else -- maybe Castro himself -- wrote it for him. ... It's not as simple as returning Elian to his dad. Unless Juan Miguel can freely decide where he wants to raise Elian and the rest of his family, re-uniting them actually will be returning a little boy, whose mother died trying to bring him to freedom, to Fidel Castro.

    TEXT: But the San Francisco Chronicle says the bonds between father and son should be the first priority:

    VOICE: Enough of the speculation about whether the father is being used by ... Fidel Castro. Even if he is -- and some of his statements [Thursday] did betray a hint of propaganda -- the fact of the matter is that he has asked for custody of his child, and the courts have affirmed his right to it. ... There should be no need for federal agents to rush into the relatives' house to seize Elian by force. Such a confrontation would only add to the trauma of a boy who lost his mother at sea. Hopefully, the father's presence in this country will finally unleash an even more powerful force in Miami: the universal human respect for parent- child bonds.

    TEXT: Another fight that has been brewing in the United States is over a vote on granting permanent normal trading relations to China. The Dallas Morning News says Congress needs to hurry up and get it done.

    VOICE: If the House rejects permanent normal trade relations, China would enter the World Trade Organization without having to open its market to the United States. In short, China would join the world trade body but the United States would not benefit. Furthermore, overall relations with the Asian power would be greatly harmed.

    TEXT: U-S editorial writers also took notice of the upcoming Peruvian elections. The Los Angeles Times says the process there so far has been a "masquerade."

    VOICE: As the candidates make their promises on the campaign trail in Peru, it's tempting to believe that democracy is blooming there. But the illusion is thin. In seeking an unprecedented third term, President Alberto Fujimori has made a mockery of both democracy and the campaign process. ... Despite the obstacles, including an incumbent who uses almost every dirty trick conceivable, voters could redress the balance. In Alejandro Toledo -- a candidate of Indian heritage who went from shoeshine boy to business school professor -- there's a possibility that [Mr.] Fujimori has met his match.

    TEXT: The Houston Chronicle says the United States should follow threats with action if the voting proves unfair:

    VOICE: The United States has a marked interest in assisting Peruvians in putting on fair and free elections. And the State Department is backing up its rhetoric on the subject with threats of sanctions on Peru. That's important because America has a legitimate concern for democracy in the region. As goes Peru's democracy, so might go democracies in neighboring Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela.

    TEXT: A judge's ruling earlier this week against Microsoft Corporation, the software maker that until recently was the world's biggest company, is still being debated. Microsoft was found guilty of antitrust violations, but it will be some time before the court decides what penalties to assess. Microsoft's founder, Bill Gates, plans to appeal the decision, but The Hartford Courant (in Connecticut) is urging him to end the court battle now.

    VOICE: Mr. Gates's decision to appeal is likely to prolong uncertainty at Microsoft and in the computer market, which today impacts many aspects of everyday life. It could be a year or more before the case works its way through the federal appeals courts and, probably, the U-S Supreme Court. ... Mr. Gates would be well- advised to resume talks with the Justice Department with the intention of reaching a settlement. Judge Jackson's elucidation of the evidence and the law and the clarity of his logic are impressive. Microsoft spared no resources to defend itself. But it lost. Mr. Gates's right of appeal is indisputable. The wisdom of doing so is questionable.

    TEXT: The Chicago Tribune is more critical of the judge's ruling.

    VOICE: Forgive consumers if they haven't uncorked the champagne yet. Given a choice of oppressive thumbs, many would probably opt for Microsoft, the monopolist, over those of the Justice Department // OPT // and 19 state attorneys general squabbling among themselves about just what ought to be bundled into the next generation desktop. // END OPT // ... Who's cheering this government victory? ... The lawyers, for sure. The primary case against Microsoft will keep batteries of them engaged for months, if not years, and the effective guilty verdict of Microsoft is already spurring a cascade of private damage suits. So all those resources that might have gone into innovating will go into litigating instead.

    TEXT: On that note, we end this look at editorial pages in Friday's U-S press.
    NEB/JON/WTW 07-Apr-2000 11:19 AM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1519 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [04] KOSOVO CONFERENCE (L-ONLY) BY STEFAN BOS (BUDAPEST)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261066
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Officials from many of the Balkan states, the United States and the European Union are taking part in a conference in Budapest on the future of the Yugoslav province of Kosovo. As Stefan Bos reports from the Hungarian capital, the first day of meetings (Friday) was overshadowed by disagreements between ethnic Albanians and Serbs over the chances for a peaceful future for Kosovo.

    TEXT: For the first time since the end of the war in Kosovo, prominent leaders from the province's ethnic Albanian and Serb communities agreed to face-to-face meetings about the future of the troubled region. But on day one of a conference here, it was already clear that the parties could not agree on who is to blame for the latest rise in ethnic tensions in Kosovo, which has forced NATO to send additional troops to the area. The question of independence for Kosovo also deeply divided those taking part in the meeting. Ethnic Albanians said there can be no lasting peace in Kosovo until the province breaks away from the Yugoslav Federation. Ethnic Serbs, even though they oppose the government in Belgrade, say Kosovo must remain part of Serbia. Although NATO peacekeepers have been on duty in Kosovo since the end of the western allies' bombing campaign against Yugoslavia last year, violence and refugee movements have continued. More than 100-thousand Serbs, plus members of other non-Albanian minorities, are estimated to have fled Kosovo during the past 10 months. Kosovo's ethnic-Albanian leader Ibrahim Rugova told V-O-A the international community should understand that some Serbs had, in his words, good reason to leave.

    /// RUGOVA ACT ///

    Some of the Serbs left Kosovo [because they were] involved in massacres. Other people have fear, after the withdrawal of Serb forces. But we promise them that after the situation stabilizes, the numbers of Serbs will come back in Kosovo.

    /// END ACT ///

    Serb opposition groups at the Budapest meeting said they had hoped for some political support from ethnic Albanians in their efforts to topple Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, who has been indicted for war crimes by the U-N tribunal in The Hague. However, the former leader of the Kosovo Liberation Army, Hashim Thaci, told reporters that Kosovo's Albanians "see no reason to take part in the Serb elections." Serb opposition leaders boycotted a news conference at which they were to appear together with ethnic- Albanian groups late Friday. The chairman of the conference, Allen Kassof of the U-S - based Project on Ethnic Relations, says he was not surprised:

    /// KASSOF ACT ///

    Their own domestic problems made them a little bit shy to discuss questions concerning Kosovo. It is a hot, radioactive, issue ... but I thought there was a very good and frank discussion -- sometimes a little bit bitter. Both populations were deeply traumatized about the war last year -- first the Albanians and then the Serbs and, naturally, this leaves its effects.

    /// END ACT ///

    Organizers of the two-day conference say the willingness of Serbs and Albanians to talk to one another may help diminish the chances of bloodshed returning to the Balkans.

    /// REST OPT ///

    The former chief prosecutor of the U-N tribunal on the former Yugoslavia, Richard Goldstone, told V-O-A before the conference began that the international community should work more actively to bring about reconciliation between Kosovo's Serbs and Albanians. Mr. Goldstone, who currently chairs the Independent International Commission on Kosovo, is preparing a report for the U-N Secretary General which will criticize the lack of police in Kosovo. He says standard police duty is not the task of peacekeepers.

    /// GOLDSTONE ACT ///

    There are not the resources allocated that were promised and that are needed. Policing is not the work of armies. Policing is not the task of armies. Armies don't like doing police work and they refuse to do it. And you know the figures as well as I do, that six-thousand U-N police personnel were promised ... and now it is less than two-thousand who are there.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Goldstone says he is pleased that Hungary is taking an important role under the Southeast Europe Stability Pact as co-chair of the group's "working round table on human rights and democratization." (Signed)
    NEB/SJB/WTW 07-Apr-2000 18:40 PM EDT (07-Apr-2000 2240 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261062
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: U-S stock prices were mixed today (Friday). The trading session was relatively quiet, after an exhausting week of exceptionally high volatility. VOA correspondent Elaine Johanson reports from New York:

    TEXT: It was a very good day for technology, especially the big-name stocks. The Nasdaq composite climbed steadily for a four percent gain. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was more volatile. It closed down, but only two points, for a fractional loss, at 11-thousand-111. The Industrials are up almost two percent for the week. The Standard and Poor's 500 index moved up 15 points, or one percent. Analysts say investors were still cautious following that more than 500-point plunge by both the Dow and the Nasdaq in intra-day trading on Tuesday. The latest on the U-S economy shows the unemployment rate for March was unchanged at four-point-one percent, with wage increases showing no inflationary pressure. The numbers were in line with Wall Street expectations.

    ///REST OPT for long ///

    This could mean the U-S central bank will not have to raise interest rates more than the widely-expected 25 basis points in May. Analyst James Weiss says the critical figure for the U-S economy is wage pressure and that looks tame:

    ///WEISS ACT///

    Well, Alan Greenspan and his colleagues certainly are watching inflation numbers very carefully. Energy will be a bit of a problem with oil prices essentially doubling from a year ago. But it's going to be a moderate problem, overwhelmed, we think, by continued good news from productivity. After all, wages still account for two-thirds of the average cost structure of American business.

    ///END ACT///

    The Federal Reserve Board has raised interest rates several times since last June in an effort to slow U-S economic growth. In other news, drug stocks edged downward in mid-day trading, after a U-S judge struck down Bristol-Myers Squibb patents on the cancer drug Taxol, which expire in a few months. The judge ruled in favor of generic drug-makers who want to produce their own versions of the medication. This will affect an estimated one-billion dollars of Taxol sales in the United States. The drug is used to treat breast and ovarian cancer, and more recently has been used for prostate cancer. (Signed) NEB/NY/EJ/LSF/ENE/PT 07-Apr-2000 17:18 PM EDT (07-Apr-2000 2118 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [06] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261042
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A European Union delegation is in Moscow for talks on the Chechnya situation with Russia's president-elect, Vladimir Putin, and other officials. V-O-A Correspondent Eve Conant reports the talks come one day after another European organization, the Council of Europe, proposed expelling Russia from the council if it does not improve its human rights record in Chechny.

    INTRO: Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov told the visiting E-U delegation that it is, in his words, "unfortunate that European lawmakers are still living with the stereotypes of the Cold War."

    /// IVANOV ACT - IN RUSSIAN - FADE UNDER ///

    He says the Council of Europe vote will complicate Russia's dialogue with the organization. And he says Russia will -- in his words -- firmly pursue its policy of eradicating terrorism and re-establishing the rule of law and human rights in Chechnya. Russia denies allegations of human rights violations including rape, summary executions, and torture of civilians at detention camps in Chechnya. Russian news agencies say officials will soon open another detention camp and that Russia's military has launched new attacks against rebel positions in Chechnya's southern mountains. (Signed)
    NEB/EC/JWH/KL 07-Apr-2000 07:21 AM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1121 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [07] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261042
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A European Union delegation is in Moscow for talks on the Chechnya situation with Russia's president-elect, Vladimir Putin, and other officials. V-O-A Correspondent Eve Conant reports the talks come one day after another European organization, the Council of Europe, proposed expelling Russia from the council if it does not improve its human rights record in Chechny.

    INTRO: Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov told the visiting E-U delegation that it is, in his words, "unfortunate that European lawmakers are still living with the stereotypes of the Cold War."

    /// IVANOV ACT - IN RUSSIAN - FADE UNDER ///

    He says the Council of Europe vote will complicate Russia's dialogue with the organization. And he says Russia will -- in his words -- firmly pursue its policy of eradicating terrorism and re-establishing the rule of law and human rights in Chechnya. Russia denies allegations of human rights violations including rape, summary executions, and torture of civilians at detention camps in Chechnya. Russian news agencies say officials will soon open another detention camp and that Russia's military has launched new attacks against rebel positions in Chechnya's southern mountains. (Signed)
    NEB/EC/JWH/KL 07-Apr-2000 07:21 AM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1121 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [08] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261042
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A European Union delegation is in Moscow for talks on the Chechnya situation with Russia's president-elect, Vladimir Putin, and other officials. V-O-A Correspondent Eve Conant reports the talks come one day after another European organization, the Council of Europe, proposed expelling Russia from the council if it does not improve its human rights record in Chechny.

    INTRO: Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov told the visiting E-U delegation that it is, in his words, "unfortunate that European lawmakers are still living with the stereotypes of the Cold War."

    /// IVANOV ACT - IN RUSSIAN - FADE UNDER ///

    He says the Council of Europe vote will complicate Russia's dialogue with the organization. And he says Russia will -- in his words -- firmly pursue its policy of eradicating terrorism and re-establishing the rule of law and human rights in Chechnya. Russia denies allegations of human rights violations including rape, summary executions, and torture of civilians at detention camps in Chechnya. Russian news agencies say officials will soon open another detention camp and that Russia's military has launched new attacks against rebel positions in Chechnya's southern mountains. (Signed)
    NEB/EC/JWH/KL 07-Apr-2000 07:21 AM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1121 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [09] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA / EUROPE (S) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261042
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A European Union delegation is in Moscow for talks on the Chechnya situation with Russia's president-elect, Vladimir Putin, and other officials. V-O-A Correspondent Eve Conant reports the talks come one day after another European organization, the Council of Europe, proposed expelling Russia from the council if it does not improve its human rights record in Chechny.

    INTRO: Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov told the visiting E-U delegation that it is, in his words, "unfortunate that European lawmakers are still living with the stereotypes of the Cold War."

    /// IVANOV ACT - IN RUSSIAN - FADE UNDER ///

    He says the Council of Europe vote will complicate Russia's dialogue with the organization. And he says Russia will -- in his words -- firmly pursue its policy of eradicating terrorism and re-establishing the rule of law and human rights in Chechnya. Russia denies allegations of human rights violations including rape, summary executions, and torture of civilians at detention camps in Chechnya. Russian news agencies say officials will soon open another detention camp and that Russia's military has launched new attacks against rebel positions in Chechnya's southern mountains. (Signed)
    NEB/EC/JWH/KL 07-Apr-2000 07:21 AM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1121 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [10] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA EUROPE (S-2ND UPDATE) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)

    DATE=4/7/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-261054
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    /// EDS: UPDATES 2-261047 WITH E-U/PUTIN COMMENTS ///

    INTRO: Officials from the European Union visiting Moscow say they expect Russia's President-elect Vladimir Putin to discuss a proposed solution to the conflict in Chechnya next week. In the meantime, V-O-A correspondent Eve Conant reports Russia is ordering an end to all fact-finding missions in Chechnya by the Council of Europe, which voted Thursday to suspend Russia's membership because of its actions in Chechnya.

    TEXT: Members of the European Union delegation say President-elect Putin told them he will present a political settlement to the Chechnya conflict next week. A Kremlin spokesman says no "political platform" is under discussion, but Moscow is looking forward to developing law and order in the region once the conflict ends. Mr. Putin told his visitors he hopes to advance Russia's relations with Europe. He said the Council of Europe vote was due to a lack of information about the real situation in Chechnya. The Council of Europe voted to sanction Moscow because of alleged human- rights violations by Russian troops in Chechnya - which Russia denies ever happened. Moscow says it will prohibit Council of Europe delegations from conducting Chechnya fact-finding missions, and vows to complete its military operation in the Caucasus republic. (Signed)
    NEB/EC/GE/WTW 07-Apr-2000 12:42 PM EDT (07-Apr-2000 1642 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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