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Voice of America, 01-09-11

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>

SLUG: 2-280330 Terror-Europe react update (L-only) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

CONTENTS

  • [01] TERROR / EUROPE REACT-UPDATE (L-only) BY DOUGLAS BAKSHIAN (LUXEMBOURG)
  • [02] U-S TERRORISM / EURO REACT (L ONLY) BY DOUGLAS BAKSHIAN (LUXEMBOURG)
  • [03] TUESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] TERROR / EUROPE REACT-UPDATE (L-only) BY DOUGLAS BAKSHIAN (LUXEMBOURG)

    DATE=09/11/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-280330
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: European Leaders have expressed horror and pledged support for America in the wake of terror attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and other sites. Douglas Bakshian reports from Luxembourg.

    TEXT: Belgian Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt, whose nation holds the European Union Presidency, said he is shocked by the attacks and he condemned the incidents. The head of the European Commission, Romano Prodi, expressed his sympathy to President Bush and to relatives of the victims. He said Europeans stand together with the United States. Meanwhile, at NATO headquarters in Brussels, alliance ambassadors held an emergency meeting to show support for the American people. NATO spokesman Yves Brodeur.

    // Brodeur act //

    It's an attack against the values that NATO represents. It's an attack against democracy, it's an attack against cvilization and NATO very much wanted to express its sorrow, its grief, to the American people.

    // end act //

    NATO Secretary General George Robertson earlier called the incidents barbaric, and said they underline the need for the international community to join forces against terrorism. In Germany, Foreign Minister Joschka Fisher expressed shock and horror and the lower house of German parliament suspended debate on the national budget in a show of sympathy. French Premier Lionel Jospin also said he was horrified and French President Jacque Chirac said the French people are behind the Americans. British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said Britain would provide whatever help it could to catch the perpetrators and British Premier Tony Blair expressed shock. In Russia, President Vladimir Putin conveyed his deep condolences to the American people.(Signed)
    NEB/PT SLUG: 2-280302 US Terrorism / Euro React (L only) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

    [02] U-S TERRORISM / EURO REACT (L ONLY) BY DOUGLAS BAKSHIAN (LUXEMBOURG)

    DATE=09/11/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-280302
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: European leaders have expressed horror and pledged support for the United States in the wake of terror attacks in New York and near Washington. Douglas Bakshian reports from Luxembourg.

    TEXT: Belgian Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt, whose nation holds the European Union presidency, said he is shocked by the attacks and he condemned the incidents. He comments came in a statement issued while on an official visit to Ukraine. The head of the European Commission, Romano Prodi, expressed his sympathy to President Bush and to relatives of the victims. He said Europeans stand together with the United States. European Commission external relations chief Chris Patten said Europe's prayers and deepest sympathy go out to the United States. He said everyone is watching events in the United States with absolute horror. In Germany, Foreign Minister Joschka Fisher expressed shock and horror and the lower house of German parliament suspended debate on the national budget in a show of sympathy. French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin also said he was horrified and French President Jacque Chirac said the French people are behind the Americans. Mr. Chirac cut short a visit to Brittany and headed back to Paris. British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said Britain would provide whatever help it could to catch the perpetrators, and British Prime Minister Tony Blair expressed shock. In Russia, President Vladimir Putin conveyed his deep condolences to the American people. Meanwhile, security is being tightened around U-S facilities in Europe. In Greece, police reportedly boosted security at the U-S embassy and other diplomatic facilities, as well as U-S businesses and schools. In Italy, airports were reported on maximum security alert and security at NATO bases was stepped up. In Germany, the aviation authority halted plane departures to the United States. In another indication of concern, gold prices surged in Europe and investors scrambled for safety in what they considered to be solid assets. Market analysts in London reported panic buying of metals, gold, and oil. (Signed)
    NEB/DB/GE/JWH SLUG: 6-12451 Tuesday's Editorials DATE: NOTE NUMBER:


    [03] TUESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=09/11/01
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-12451
    INTERNET=YES EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: The United States media has been galvanized by a series of apparent terrorist attacks in New York and near Washington. The attacks occurred after virtually all Tuesday's paper's editorials were written, so reaction will come later. In the available commentaries, newspapers discussed the slowing U-S economy and the aftermath of the Mexican president's visit to Washington. Other editorials deal with the now-concluded racism conference, civil war mediation in Sudan, a communications deal between A-O-L Time Warner and China, and continuing violence in the Middle East. Here with a closer look and some excerpts is _________________ and today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: As gloomy economic news continues to make front page headlines, more and more U-S editorial writers are commenting on America's economic outlook, and how President Bush is handling it. The Detroit News says: "Slowing growth shows need for immediate tax, budget cuts."

    VOICE: Government figures last week showed that the nation's unemployment rate in August had jumped to four-point-nine percent -- one point higher than last October. This is arguably the worst economic news ... the country has received so far this year. President ...Bush responded to it by declaring that he is "very worried." But if (Mr.) Bush wants to prevent the economy -- and, along with it, his political fortunes -- from nose-diving, he must do more than worry; he must come up with a credible growth plan that includes spending cuts and accelerated and expanded tax cuts.

    TEXT: In New Hampshire, the Manchester Union Leader suggests that President "Bush should support (a) cut in (the) capital gains tax." And in Florida, the Palm Beach Post suggests:

    VOICE: ... The smart play for Congress would be to repeal some of the tax cut.

    TEXT: In California, the San Francisco Chronicle laments all the signs of a deflating economy, and then complains:

    VOICE: Another trouble sign is Washington's feckless indecision. With the storm clouds gathering, neither major party knows what to forecast. Republicans and Democrats trade blame, but no prescription has emerged from either camp. ... The country needs to hear from its leaders about policies that answer the challenge of reviving a sinking economy.

    TEXT: The Chicago Tribune however, complains that all this bad economic news should not send the nation, or the White House into a panic.

    VOICE: Get a grip, folks. There is plenty of bad news on the economic front, but there is also some good news. ... Inflation is still in check... Making panicky policy decisions is hardly the way to make Americans feel confident that their future is in good hands.

    TEXT: Newspapers also discussed U-S Mexican relations in the wake of President Vicente Fox's state visit. In Salt Lake City, the Desert (Dez-uh-ret) News suggests that both the United States and Mexico need to commit to improve relations between the two countries.

    VOICE: The election of (President) Fox a little over a year ago represents a dramatic change for Mexico. In what probably was the freest and fairest vote in the country's history, the populace put an end to 71 years of one-party rule in Mexico. For (Mr.) Fox to succeed, he has to have the help of the United States. ... Based on his first year in office, (Mr.) Fox merits U-S support.

    TEXT: On the issue of Mexican immigration, and dealing with the illegal Mexican aliens already in this country, the Orlando Sentinel says: "Set (an) immigration goal." The paper disagrees with a blanket amnesty for all illegal workers, but suggests:

    VOICE: Why not embrace a compromise that would allow a larger but still manageable number of guest workers from all countries into the United States under strict rules for a set period of time? Then they would rotate out and others could take their place.

    TEXT: The Atlanta (Georgia) Journal comments on the recently concluded U-N anti-racisim conference in South Africa.

    VOICE: We'll admit it. The pointless U-N-sponsored World Conference Against Racism, xenophobia and related intolerance has succeeded -- in lowering our tolerance level. ... But what really got our goat (made us angry) is that some participants who vilified the United States every step of the way and declared Secretary of State Colin Powell's boycott to be betrayal were U-S legislators.

    TEXT: The San Jose Mercury News suggests:

    VOICE: The ... conference ... may have done as much to illustrate the deep divisions between peoples and countries as it did to lessen them.

    TEXT: And in Wisconsin, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel laments:

    VOICE: Far from being a sober attempt to cope with a legitimate problem, the conference degenerated into a festival of hypocrisy and hatred.

    TEXT: Turning to Sudan's civil war, the Oklahoman praises the naming of a special U-S mediator, Senator John Danforth of Missouri, to try to negotiate a peace, but adds:

    VOICE: ... His efforts are being undermined by interests in the United States. Legislation that would deny foreign oil companies doing business in Sudan the ability to raise funds or trade their securities in U-S capital markets is being opposed by the Bush administration. ... Cash from oil sales is helping the Khartoum government enslave Christians.

    TEXT: On another matter, the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville is pleased with a communications deal between A-O-L Time Warner and an Australian company to broadcast each other's news to Chna.

    VOICE: The more the Chinese people are exposed to the United States, even on the tube (television), the more camaraderie they may feel toward Americans. That could cause pressure not only for political reform but also for closer diplomatic ties.

    TEXT: As regards the Middle East, and so far frustrated efforts to get the Israelis and Palestinians talking peace again, The Houston (Texas) Chronicle says:" For those on both sides with any expectations, such a meeting is likely to disappoint."

    VOICE: In Texas, the Austin American-Statesman takes on the issue of demonstrations against globalization at each economic summit, and suggests:

    VOICE: There are many good ways the world's leaders could respond to the concern about world poverty that underpins the anti-globalization protests. They could increase aid budgets, which have stagnated shamefully over the past decade. They could open their markets for agricultural goods and textiles, so boosting poor-country exports and blunting the suspicion that international trade rules are rigged in favor of the rich.

    TEXT: On that comment, we end this sampling of editorial comment from Tuesday's U-S newspapers.
    NEB/ANG/JWH


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