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OMRI Daily Digest II, No. 220, 10 November 1995

From: "Steve Iatrou" <siatrou@cdsp.neu.edu>

Open Media Research Institute Directory

CONTENTS

  • [1] KRAJINA REFUGEES SUFFER IN SERBIA.

  • [2] MILOSEVIC SHOWS NO DESIRE TO COMPROMISE.

  • [3] BOSNIA, SERBIA TO RECEIVE GAS SUPPLIES.

  • [4] WAR CRIMES TRIBUNAL INDICTS RUMP YUGOSLAV OFFICERS.

  • [5] MACEDONIA, UKRAINE BECOME MEMBERS OF COUNCIL OF EUROPE.

  • [6] ROMANIAN SENATE PASSES RESTITUTION LAW.

  • [7] ROMANIA DENIES BANNING HUNGARIAN TV CHANNEL.

  • [8] NATO AIRCRAFT ALLOWED TO FLY OVER ROMANIA.

  • [9] WORLD BANK ON MOLDOVAN ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE.

  • [10] BULGARIA PROTESTS TO ANKARA.

  • [11] ANOTHER BOMB ATTACK ON JOURNALIST IN ALBANIA.


  • OMRI DAILY DIGEST

    No. 220, Part II, 10 November 1995

    SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [1] KRAJINA REFUGEES SUFFER IN SERBIA.

    The UN Security Council on 9 November unanimously approved a resolution condemning all violence in the former Yugoslavia. The bulk of the admonitions was directed at the Bosnian Serbs, who were urged to close detention camps and provide international monitors with access to suspected mass grave sites. AFP added that Croatia was told to respect the rights of Serbs in the former Krajina and to let refugees go home. The warnings to Zagreb reportedly came at the behest of Moscow, Paris, and London. Mlada Fronta Dnes on 10 November showed a photo of elderly Serbs near Knin receiving UN relief packages. Meanwhile in Belgrade, the Alternative Information Network said that Serbian refugees in Krajina who fled to Serbia live as outsiders and are terrorized by paramilitaries led by internationally wanted war criminal Zeljko Raznatovic "Arkan." Many Krajina Serbs said they would rather go home, even if their houses were in ruins, than stay on in Serbia under such conditions. -- Patrick Moore

    [2] MILOSEVIC SHOWS NO DESIRE TO COMPROMISE.

    Reuters on 9 November reported that U.S. negotiators will hand over documents to the Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian delegations at the Dayton talks that, it is hoped, may lay the foundation for a regional peace. But Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic has already said that he will back no plans providing for the ouster of Bosnian Serb leaders and indicted war criminals Radovan Karadzic and his military counterpart, Ratko Mladic before a peace accord is reached. Also, on 9 November, Vecernji list reports that Milosevic will continue to refuse to recognize Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia, nor will he discuss the issue of human rights in Serbia. -- Stan Markotich

    [3] BOSNIA, SERBIA TO RECEIVE GAS SUPPLIES.

    Following a joint request by the presidents of Bosnia and Serbia for domestic gas supplies to be turned on "as a humanitarian exception" to the embargo, agreement was reached at the Bosnia peace talks in Dayton on 9 November to partially lift economic sanctions against rump Yugoslavia, Reuters reported the same day. A UN committee overseeing sanctions met later in New York to discuss the issue but postponed talks for a day after one member said it needed instructions. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [4] WAR CRIMES TRIBUNAL INDICTS RUMP YUGOSLAV OFFICERS.

    Nasa Borba on 10 November reported that the International Crimunal Tribune for the Former Yugoslavia the previous day indicted three Yugoslav army officers for their part in crimes against humanity. Colonel Mile Mrksic, Major Veselin Sljivancanin, and Captain Miroslav Radic have been charged in connection with the slaying of 260 non-Serbian prisoners of war held in the Croatian town of Vukovar. On 20 November 1991 the victims were massacred behind a local hospital and their bodies concealed in a mass grave. The Belgrade daily observed this is the first instance of the court charging rump Yugoslav nationals with wartime atrocities. -- Stan Markotich

    [5] MACEDONIA, UKRAINE BECOME MEMBERS OF COUNCIL OF EUROPE.

    Macedonia and Ukraine on 9 November became the 37th and 38th member states of the Council of Europe, international agencies reported the same day. They are the 13th and 14th states from Central and Eastern Europe to enter the council in the last five years. To fulfill membership requirements, Macedonian officials made formal pledges to guarantee human rights, and Ukrainian officials agreed to suspend and eventually eliminate the death penalty from the country's criminal code. Ukraine is the first former Soviet republic to abolish capital punishment. The council's legal and human rights committees are currently reviewing membership applications from Russia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [6] ROMANIAN SENATE PASSES RESTITUTION LAW.

    The Romanian Senate on 9 November passed a version of the restitution law that takes into account the Constitutional Court's objections to a version passed by the Chamber of Deputies, Radio Bucharest reported the same day. The Chamber of Deputies amended its original version to make Romanian citizens eligible for restitution even if they reside abroad and to allow owners of apartments taken over by the state without appropriate legislation to reclaim their property. The opposition considers the law too restrictive. Romanian media on 10 November reported opposition members as saying the vote in the Senate was a fraud, since among those who voted "yes" were parliamentarians on a visit to China and other absentees. The opposition says that without these fraudulent votes, the draft would have failed to garner the necessary support. -- Michael Shafir

    [7] ROMANIA DENIES BANNING HUNGARIAN TV CHANNEL.

    Romania's National Audio- Visual Council has denied banning broadcasts of the Hungarian satellite program Duna TV on cable network (see OMRI Daily Digest, 8 November), Romanian media reported on 9-10 November. The controversial decision aroused strong criticism among Romania's Hungarian minority. -- Matyas Szabo

    [8] NATO AIRCRAFT ALLOWED TO FLY OVER ROMANIA.

    Romania and NATO have signed an agreement allowing NATO transport aircraft to fly over Romanian territory, Reuters reported on 9 November, citing the Foreign Ministry spokesman in Bucharest. The agreement was signed in Brussels last week. Mircea Geona said the agreement was "an important step towards Romania's integration into NATO." -- Michael Shafir

    [9] WORLD BANK ON MOLDOVAN ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE.

    James Park, World Bank permanent representative in Moldova, said the country has made important progress in macroeconomic tightening, liberalization of trade and prices, and privatization, BASA-press reported on 9 November. In an interview with the government daily Moldova suverana, Park said that it was nonetheless necessary to introduce other reforms as well, especially in agriculture and the social sector. He said that if the reforms lost momentum, the "achieved results would be minimized." -- Michael Shafir

    [10] BULGARIA PROTESTS TO ANKARA.

    Bulgaria has protested to Turkey for what it called that country's diplomatic support for candidates of the ethnic Turkish Movement for Rights and Freedoms in the recent local elections. A spokesman for the Bulgarian Foreign Ministry said the activities of Turkish diplomats exceeded normal standards of diplomatic representation and could strain bilateral relations, noting that their activity can be interpreted as "an attempt to influence the outcome of elections," Reuters reported on 9 November. The Movement for Rights and Freedoms won about 5% of the vote in the first round of elections, which took place on 29 October. -- Lowell Bezanis

    [11] ANOTHER BOMB ATTACK ON JOURNALIST IN ALBANIA.

    Just six days after a bomb damaged the house of Koha Jone chief editor Nikolle Lesi (see OMRI Daily Digest, 3 and 8 November), the car of the Albanian Radio and TV journalist Sami Selishta was destroyed by explosives in northeastern town of Peshkopi, Gazeta Shqiptare reported on 9 November. The daily claimed that an "anti-media Mafia" was responsible for the attacks, but so far police have no leads on the assailants. -- Fabian Schmidt

    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz

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