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OMRI Daily Digest II, No. 67, 3 April 1996

From: OMRI-L <omri-l@ubvm.cc.buffalo.edu>

Open Media Research Institute Directory

CONTENTS

  • [1] SHALIKASHVILI SAYS U.S. TROOPS WILL NOT PURSUE WAR CRIMINALS.

  • [2] KARADZIC PICKED TO NEGOTIATE WITH INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY.

  • [3] BILDT WARNS ABOUT SOCIAL UNREST.

  • [4] U.S. OFFICIAL URGES SERBIAN PRESIDENT TO SEND WAR CRIMINALS TO THE HAGUE.

  • [5] CROATIAN OPPOSITION PARTIES LAUNCH ELECTORAL PACT.

  • [6] VOJVODINA UPDATE.

  • [7] MACEDONIAN LIBERALS WANT DISSOLUTION OF PARLIAMENT.

  • [8] ROMANIA APPLIES FOR NATO MEMBERSHIP.

  • [9] ROMANIAN GOVERNMENT APPOINTS NEW POLICE CHIEF.

  • [10] THOUSANDS PROTEST BULGARIAN GOVERNMENT'S RESPONSE TO YELTSIN REMARK.

  • [11] BULGARIAN PARLIAMENT PASSES CHANGES TO LAW ON NATIONAL BANK.

  • [12] U.S. TO GIVE MILITARY AID TO ALBANIA.

  • [13] ALBANIAN CENTRIST PARTIES REGISTER ON JOINT LIST.


  • OMRI DAILY DIGEST

    No. 67, Part II, 3 April 1996

    SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [1] SHALIKASHVILI SAYS U.S. TROOPS WILL NOT PURSUE WAR CRIMINALS. U.S.

    Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff John Shalikashvili said he is "comfortable" with NATO's planned withdrawal from Bosnia at the end of the year. He added that one year will be enough to tell whether the people in the area are serious about peace, AFP quoted the Washington Post as saying on 3 April. A debate is taking place in the U.S. and elsewhere as to whether the one-year mandate for IFOR will be sufficient. The daily noted that the U.S. commander on the ground, Adm. Leighton Smith, has not ruled out an extension. Shalikashvili also opposed any American hunt for Bosnian war criminals. He said it is the duty of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic to bring the indicted Bosnian Serbs to justice and that people like Radovan Karadzic will be out of office after the upcoming elections. -- Patrick Moore

    [2] KARADZIC PICKED TO NEGOTIATE WITH INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY.

    The Bosnian Serb parliament wrapped up its latest session in the early hours of 3 April, AFP reported. It selected civilian leader Radovan Karadzic to head a committee representing the Bosnian Serbs in talks with the international community. He said the committee was "indispensable" due to "the numerous attempts being made to interpret the Dayton accords to the Serbs' detriment." He added that his heading the committee was "in line with the constitution of the [Republika Srpska] under which the president of the republic represents the state." The international community does not, however, have anything to do with Karadzic, an indicted war criminal. Under the terms of an agreement between Pale and Belgrade last August, Milosevic alone represents the Bosnian Serbs in such talks. -- Patrick Moore

    [3] BILDT WARNS ABOUT SOCIAL UNREST.

    The international community's High Representative in Bosnia, Carl Bildt, said economic assistance will be vital to curb unemployment, especially for tens of thousands of demobilized men, AFP reported on 2 April. He also said that war criminals must be brought to justice and the multi-ethnic nature of Bosnia preserved, the International Herald Tribune and Nasa Borba added on 3 April. In Strbac, Serbs and Croats exchanged a total of 31 prisoners, Croatian and Serbian radios noted. In Sarajevo, in a rare display of unity, President Alija Izetbegovic and former Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic issued a joint declaration saying that Bosnia must be "a multiethnic community based on human rights and freedoms," Onasa news agency said on 2 April. They were seconded by five political parties, Vecernje novine reported. -- Patrick Moore

    [4] U.S. OFFICIAL URGES SERBIAN PRESIDENT TO SEND WAR CRIMINALS TO THE HAGUE.

    John Kornblum, U.S. envoy to the former Yugoslavia, met with Slobodan Milosevic on 2 April and urged him to extradite war crimes suspects to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Reuters reported. Kornblum observed that while Serbia has recently sent to the Hague two suspects implicated in the 1995 massacre of Muslim civilians near Srebrenica, others remain at large in Serbia, including three officers involved in the 1991 massacre of civilians in the Croatian city of Vukovar. In a separate development, the U.S Congress has passed a motion criticizing Belgrade for its recent clampdown on independent media and humanitarian groups, notably the Soros Foundation, Nasa Borba reported on 3 April. -- Stan Markotich

    [5] CROATIAN OPPOSITION PARTIES LAUNCH ELECTORAL PACT.

    Seven key parties opposed to the governing Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ) have signed a declaration on joint action for the expected upcoming elections in Zagreb, Novi list reported on 3 April. The signatories include the Croatian Social-Liberal Party, which is the largest opposition grouping and which has been criticized for its earlier reluctance to present a united electoral front against the HDZ. The opposition currently has a majority in the city council but its choice of mayor has been repeatedly rejected by President Franjo Tudjman. Polls suggest that voters are fed up with Tudjman's behavior and that the opposition will do even better in the early vote. * Patrick Moore

    [6] VOJVODINA UPDATE.

    Nenad Canak, leader of the Social Democratic Party in Vojvodina, has met with Hungarian President Gyula Horn to discuss autonomy for the Serbian province, Nasa Borba reported on 2 April. Canak is slated to present his views to the Hungarian government "in detail." Before the collapse of socialist Yugoslavia Vojvodina had a population of some 2 million, roughly 22% of whom were ethnic Hungarians. In a separate development, Dragoljub Micunovic, former president of the Serbian Democratic Party, has offered his support for Vojvodina's autonomy. Micunovic, however, has stressed that he promotes cultural and economic autonomy, Nasa Borba reported. -- Stan Markotich

    [7] MACEDONIAN LIBERALS WANT DISSOLUTION OF PARLIAMENT.

    The Macedonian Liberal Party on 2 April announced it will submit a motion asking for the parliament to be dissolved by 15 September, Nova Makedonija reported. The Liberals claim that the parliament is no longer representative since the coalition Union for Macedonia fell apart after the formation a new government in February. That government does not include the Liberals. The Union for Macedonia was composed of the Social Democratic Union of Macedonia, the Liberals, and the Socialist Party. Representatives of the Social Democrats and Socialists dismissed the Liberals' claim that the parliament is not legitimate. -- Stefan Krause

    [8] ROMANIA APPLIES FOR NATO MEMBERSHIP.

    Romania on 2 April submitted documents to NATO officials in Brussels designed to open discussions on the country's membership in the alliance, an RFE/RL correspondent in Bucharest and local media reported. The documents were approved last month by the Supreme Council for the Country's Defense, chaired by President Ion Iliescu. Romania is the fourth country--after Latvia, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia--to submit such documents. It was also the first to sign up for NATO's Partnership for Peace Program. -- Matyas Szabo

    [9] ROMANIAN GOVERNMENT APPOINTS NEW POLICE CHIEF.

    Gen. Costica Voicu on 2 April was named the country's new police chief, Romanian media and Reuters reported. Voicu, who was formerly deputy chief of police, replaces Gen. Ion Pitulescu, who resigned in mid-February in protest over alleged tolerance among judicial officials of crime and corruption. Voicu is the seventh chief of Romania's General Police Inspectorate since the fall of the Ceausescu regime in December 1989. -- Matyas Szabo

    [10] THOUSANDS PROTEST BULGARIAN GOVERNMENT'S RESPONSE TO YELTSIN REMARK.

    Thousands of people gathered outside the Bulgarian government building on 2 April to protest the government's failure to clearly distance itself from a recent remark by Russian President Boris Yeltsin, RFE/RL reported. Yeltsin had said at the signing last week of the regional integration agreement with Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan that Bulgaria might also sign an integration agreement with Russia and other former Soviet republics. Union of Democratic Forces Chairman Ivan Kostov called on Prime Minister Zhan Videnov to "clearly and categorically" reject Yeltsin's statement. Bulgarian Socialist Party caucus leader Krasimir Premyanov accused President Zhelyu Zhelev of exploiting the situation for his re-election goals. He added that the opposition's protests might harm relations with Russia. Meanwhile, the government has said it is trying to balance its foreign policy priorities between the EU and the CIS. -- Stefan Krause

    [11] BULGARIAN PARLIAMENT PASSES CHANGES TO LAW ON NATIONAL BANK.

    The Bulgarian parliament on 2 April amended the law on the national bank giving the power to appoint and remove the governor and three deputy governors to the legislature, Bulgarian media reported. The president retains that power vis-a-vis the other five members of the executive board. Deputies rejected a clause removing the president's right to veto changes to the board proposed by the governor. A board member's mandate may be terminated owing to his resignation, death, criminal conviction, or inability to perform his duties for more than one year. -- Michael Wyzan

    [12] U.S. TO GIVE MILITARY AID TO ALBANIA. U.S.

    Defense Secretary William Perry said Washington will give military equipment worth more than $100 million to Albania, Reuters reported on 2 April. The package will include anti-tank missiles, anti-aircraft missiles, and other military supplies. Perry said the U.S. has no plans to set up a base in Albania but pointed out it would support the building of a new training center in Bize. Albanian President Sali Berisha awarded Perry the Order of Skanderbeg, the highest decoration bestowed on foreigners, at the end of his three-day visit. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [13] ALBANIAN CENTRIST PARTIES REGISTER ON JOINT LIST.

    The Albanian Democratic Alliance and the Social Democratic Party have registered as a joint party for the upcoming elections in late May or early June, Gazeta Shqiptare reported on 3 April. The two parties' leaders--Neritan Ceka and Skender Gjinushihe--head the new group, which is called the Pole of the Center. Neither has ruled out the possibility of a coalition with the Socialist Party or the Party for Human Rights, which represents the country's ethnic Greeks. -- Fabian Schmidt

    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz

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