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OMRI Pursuing Balkan Peace, No. 26, 96-07-02

Open Media Research Institute: Pursuing Balkan Peace Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: Open Media Research Institute <http://www.omri.cz>

Pursuing Balkan Peace
No. 26, 2 July 1996


CONTENTS

  • [01] KARADZIC'S SLEIGHT OF HAND
  • [02] UNLESS GRANTED "GUARANTEES," KARADZIC WILL RUN IN ELECTIONS.
  • [03] KARADZIC "AHEAD OF THEM ALL?"
  • [04] BELGRADE GIVES BOSNIAN SERB LEADER ULTIMATUM.
  • [05] BULATOVIC ON BOSNIAN SERB AFFAIRS.
  • [06] MONTENEGRIN PRESIDENT RENEWS CALLS FOR KARADZIC'S OUSTER.
  • [07] SERBIAN RADICALS BACK KARADZIC.
  • [08] WAR CRIMES TRIBUNAL HEARS CASE AGAINST KARADZIC AND MLADIC.
  • [09] DRAMA AT THE HAGUE.
  • [10] WAR CRIMES TRIBUNAL INDICTS RAPE SUSPECTS.
  • [11] EXHUMATION BEGINS IN SREBRENICA AREA.
  • [12] BIGGEST WAVE OF EVICTIONS IN BANJA LUKA SINCE DAYTON.
  • [13] BOUTROS GHALI BLASTS SEPARATISM IN BOSNIA.
  • [14] BOSNIAN ELECTIONS TO GO AHEAD ON 14 SEPTEMBER...
  • [15] ...WHILE DOUBTS REMAIN.
  • [16] BOSNIAN SERB TOWN TO EXPAND ASSEMBLY TO REFLECT CHANGES.
  • [17] MOSTAR ELECTIONS COME OFF SMOOTHLY.
  • [18] U.S. SAYS ISLAMIC FIGHTERS ARE GONE FROM BOSNIA.
  • [19] BOSNIAN SERB GENERAL SEES POSSIBILITY FOR CONFLICT.
  • [20] THE REPUBLIKA SRPSKA'S "ARIZONA ROAD."
  • [21] THE KARADZIC IMBROGLIO: BILDT TRAPS HIMSELF.

  • [01] KARADZIC'S SLEIGHT OF HAND

    Bosnian Serb civilian leader and indicted war criminal Radovan Karadzic announced on 30 June that he will delegate all of his powers as president of the Republika Srpska (RS) to his hard-line vice president, Biljana Plavsic. He will continue to retain the title of president, the chair of his governing Serbian Democratic Party (SDS), and the option of running in the 14 September Bosnia-wide elections, the BBC reported. Plavsic herself stressed that Karadzic remains president, that her assumption of his duties is merely temporary, and that only an election can remove him from office. She is regarded as one of his strongest nationalist loyalists, and even Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic once suggested in public that she needs a psychiatrist.

    Karadzic's move comes against the backdrop of the SDS's election convention, which reelected him as party leader on 29 June and nominated him on 1 July to run for the presidency in September. This also comes after threats by representatives of the international community and by Milosevic that Karadzic must go or the RS will face renewed sanctions (see below). Milosevic had earlier resisted pressures against Karadzic but has since been confronted with the possibility of renewed sanctions against Belgrade if he does not take steps against his former protege.

    The Dayton agreement explicitly says that there is no place in public life for war criminals. Karadzic had previously delegated some of his duties to Plavsic to try to sidestep the issue, and on 27 June made any resignation conditional on political and territorial concessions to the RS, Nasa Borba reported. He specifically demanded recognition of the RS as an independent entity, and the outright cession to the RS of the strategic town of Brcko, which is headed for international arbitration later this year.

    The major Western allies found Karadzic's conditions unacceptable last week, and it appears that his latest move has not impressed them, either. On 30 June, White House spokesman David Johnson said: "our policy on him remains what we have said in the past: that he needs to be not only out of power but he needs to be out of influence, out of town and in the dock." Reuters also reported that Germany, France, and the UK agreed with the U.S., but that Johnson admitted to "some confusion" regarding the Western reaction in general. This stemmed from the initial position taken by some international representatives dealing with Bosnia, such as High Representative Carl Bildt, who seemed to be content with Karadzic's move as "a step in the right direction" (see below). He had earlier said that "Karadzic has now delegated all his authority. He still nominally calls himself president. Let him. He can call himself the Chinese emperor or Donald Duck. It means nothing," Beta news agency noted.

    Reuters quoted a Western diplomat, however, as suggesting that the Serbs had again taken Bildt to the cleaners. The BBC added that the Bosnian government denounced Karadzic's announcement as a sham, but that entire affair has boosted Karadzic's popularity with many Bosnian Serbs. -- Patrick Moore

    [02] UNLESS GRANTED "GUARANTEES," KARADZIC WILL RUN IN ELECTIONS.

    Unless the Republika Srpska's international recognition is assured, Karadzic will indeed run in the forthcoming elections and win, he said at the 27 June session of the SDS steering committee, Nasa Borba reported. The daily also reported that posters of Karadzic as the SDS candidate appeared in Pale as a part of the party's pre-election campaign. U.S. Assistant Secretary of State John Kornblum said in Sarajevo, however, that the U.S. will accept no conditions on Karadzic's resignation. "He must now quickly bow to the pressure of the international community... leave office and go to The Hague," AFP quoted him as saying. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [03] KARADZIC "AHEAD OF THEM ALL?"

    But indicted war criminal or not, Karadzic seems to have succeeded in convincing many of his countrymen that his fight is theirs as well. According to recent polling data garnered from ten towns in the Republika Srpska by Ekstra Magazin, the SDS remains "ahead of them all" in voter preference, Nasa Borba reported on 25 June. A plurality of 40.5% of decided voters would reportedly cast their ballots for the SDS in upcoming elections, while only 17.5% would back the Milosevic-sponsored Socialists. In third place, gaining the support of 11%, is the Serbian Radical Party of accused war criminal Vojislav Seselj. Some 30.5% of those polled, dubbed Karadzic "the personage of confidence," while only 14% said they had confidence in Milosevic. -- Stan Markotich

    [04] BELGRADE GIVES BOSNIAN SERB LEADER ULTIMATUM.

    Milosevic, for his part, seems to have added to the pressure on his former protege. The Serbian president, along with his federal counterpart Zoran Lilic and Montenegro's Momir Bulatovic, gave Karadzic an ultimatum to demand his immediate departure from the Bosnian Serb presidency, Nasa Borba reported on 26 June. According to the ultimatum, Karadzic's noncompliance with the terms of the Dayton deal warrants his ouster, and failure to depart from office would result in a renewed round of sanctions against the Republika Srpska by rump Yugoslavia. Reuters observed that the ultimatum "came after months of lobbying by the U.S. and European officials who believe Karadzic's continued presence in office is a threat to the Bosnian peace process" and adds that with Karadzic's ouster, other Bosnian Serb hardliners may become easier to prosecute at The Hague. -- Stan Markotich

    [05] BULATOVIC ON BOSNIAN SERB AFFAIRS.

    The Montenegrin president, moreover, went on record saying that "Karadzic... may not officially and legally enter Montenegro." Nasa Borba on 27 June reported that when queried at a press conference about whether or not Karadzic and his military counterpart Gen. Ratko Mladic would be taken prisoner if discovered in Montenegro -- given that "some months ago Karadzic was not apprehended during 'a walkabout of Montenegro,'" -- Bulatovic said he had no "official information" about "Radovan Karadzic's sojourns in these parts." Bulatovic described Karadzic as "a very well protected man... His house is guarded by some 500 heavily armed men." He added he did not believe the Republika Srpska would collapse if Mladic and Karadzic were to give up politics and, according to Montena-fax reports of 26 June, feels "that not even the international community insists on [Karadzic] being sent to The Hague, but only on his removal from political life." -- Stan Markotich

    [06] MONTENEGRIN PRESIDENT RENEWS CALLS FOR KARADZIC'S OUSTER.

    Bulatovic repeated his call for Karadzic to go, this time on a 28 June interview with RFE/RL. Bulatovic observed that "Karadzic, as the leader of the Bosnian Serbs and the Serbian Democratic Party, refuses to meet [conditions] he has already agreed to." But when queried about whether or not rump Yugoslavia was prepared to send to The Hague three Yugoslav army officers accused of involvement in the massacre of at least 260 Croat civilians near Vukovar in 1991, he said that question was "too sensitive to answer with just a yes or a no." -- Stan Markotich

    [07] SERBIAN RADICALS BACK KARADZIC.

    But Karadzic still has his friends in rump Yugoslavia, especially members of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS), led by accused war criminal Vojislav Seselj. Nasa Borba on 28 June reported that Seselj has almost unconditionally backed a Karadzic run for the Bosnian Serb presidency. According to the daily, Seselj has remarked that the SRS in the Republika Srpska would "[even] endorse Karadzic and... withdraw their own candidate." -- Stan Markotich

    [08] WAR CRIMES TRIBUNAL HEARS CASE AGAINST KARADZIC AND MLADIC.

    But the folks at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague have been active, too. On 27 June they launched hearings against the two top indicted Bosnian Serb war criminals, AFP reported. This is not a trial in absentia, but is a form of investigation and political pressure based on the tribunal's Rule 61. That measure was drawn up specifically to deal with cases such as Croatia and Serbia, in which the accused are hiding behind a state's refusal to hand them over. Witnesses give evidence, although Karadzic's lawyer is not supposed to participate in hearing lest it turn into a trial, Nasa Borba reported. Two lists of charges have been drawn up for each of the two accused. The first concerns the war in Bosnia in general, and covers ethnic cleansing, prison camps, murder, rape, and torture as well as the bombing of civilian targets and the seizing of UN soldiers. The other concerns the "direct responsibility" of Karadzic and Mladic in the killings and mass graves that followed the fall of Srebrenica. At the end of the week- long hearings, the tribunal is expected to issue an international arrest warrant for the two accused. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [09] DRAMA AT THE HAGUE.

    Karadzic's Belgrade lawyer, Igor Pantelic, nonetheless appeared before the court and asked to listen to proceedings and be given access to the documents prepared by the prosecutor's office, Nasa Borba reported. The latter request was rejected as contradicting tribunal rules. After the proceedings, Pantelic said he was quitting because he found the court's treatment unfair. Meanwhile, the tribunal's prosecution office presented evidence against the Republika Srpska and rump Yugoslavia for not arresting the two accused despite having had "numerous chances" to do so, and called for the tribunal president to officially inform the UN Security Council of the two countries' non- cooperation. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [10] WAR CRIMES TRIBUNAL INDICTS RAPE SUSPECTS.

    The court has not been busy only with the two "big fish": 17 more individuals have been indicted, Nasa Borba reported on 28 June. Among them are nine ethnic Croats, accused of taking part in attacks on Muslim settlements and in massacres against Muslim civilians. The remaining eight are ethnic Serbs, accused of taking part in the mass rape of Muslim women. According to various reports, the indicted Serbs took prisoners near the southeast Bosnian town of Foca between April 1992 and February 1993. Some of the women were as young as twelve years-old. They were enslaved, beaten, and forced to work in make-shift brothels. The indictments against the ethnic Serbs marks the first time The Hague has dealt with instances of rape as war crimes. -- Stan Markotich

    [11] EXHUMATION BEGINS IN SREBRENICA AREA.

    And other war crimes were in the news as well. The UN Office for Human Rights in Sarajevo said that a Finnish expert team would begin on 25 June to exhume the remains of bodies in the area of Srebrenica, Oslobodjenje reported on 24 June. The Finns will work in the region of Kravice, where several thousand men are believed to have been killed when the former enclave was overrun by Serbs in July 1995. The team will also examine and attempt to identify the remains so that they may be given proper burials by their kin or by the Bosnian government, UN spokesman Alexander Ivanko said. The team will act within the mandate of the UN Special Reporter on Human Rights, Elizabeth Rehn of Finland, and the UN expert on missing persons, Manfred Novak, AFP reported. The project, sponsored by the Finnish and Dutch governments, is to be completed in four weeks. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [12] BIGGEST WAVE OF EVICTIONS IN BANJA LUKA SINCE DAYTON.

    Ethnic cleansing, moreover, continues. Kris Janowski, the UNHCR spokesman in Sarajevo, said some 52 Muslims were evicted from their homes in Serb- controlled Banja Luka starting early June. This is the biggest wave of "ethnic cleansing" since the Dayton peace accord was signed, Oslobodjenje reported on 26 June. Janowski said the UNHCR has no evidence that the Serb police are behind the evictions "but they obviously cannot control it." Meanwhile, the head of the NATO-led Implementation Force in Bosnia, U.S. Admiral Leighton Smith, warned Serb Parliament Speaker Momcilo Krajisnik at a meeting in Pale that he was not satisfied with the Serbs' treatment of Bosnian Muslims, AFP reported on 24 June. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [13] BOUTROS GHALI BLASTS SEPARATISM IN BOSNIA.

    Back in New York, the UN issued a report under the name of its secretary general charging the Bosnian Serbs with consolidating and continuing ethnic cleansing, Reuters and AFP stated on 26 June. The study specifically cites the resettling of Serbs from the Sarajevo suburbs in the Brcko area of northern Bosnia, the fate of which is to be determined by international arbitration later this year. Boutros Boutros Ghali concluded that "it appears that the Republika Srpska remains active in its efforts aimed at separation, as publicly declared by its present leadership and reflected by events on the ground." The report also noted separatist tendencies among the Croats and even the Muslims. Boutros Ghali added that UN efforts to improve police work throughout Bosnia-Herzegovina will be meaningless if the local police continue "to discriminate against, harass and intimidate citizens who are not of their own ethnicity." He also condemned Croatia for the killing of Krajina Serbs and the pillaging of their property, Nasa Borba wrote on 27 June. -- Patrick Moore

    [14] BOSNIAN ELECTIONS TO GO AHEAD ON 14 SEPTEMBER...

    But it was the elections -- after Karadzic -- that proved to be the main news story of the week. OSCE chairman Flavio Cotti announced on 25 June that the Bosnian general elections will take place on the last possible date set down in the Dayton peace agreement. The vote has been described as the most complicated in history and will take place on seven different levels in the Croat-Muslim federation and in the Republika Srpska. An OSCE diplomat told the BBC that the upcoming elections will give an impetus to all sides to respect the civilian provisions of the treaty such as freedom of movement and open media. But to date such provisions have largely been ignored, and, as long as IFOR refuses to enforce them, are likely to be ignored in the future. -- Patrick Moore

    [15] ...WHILE DOUBTS REMAIN.

    Bosnian Vice President Ejup Ganic welcomed the announcement of the vote, saying: "we think the elections will reinforce the stability of Bosnia- Herzegovina." But his government also stressed that the Serbs' non-compliance with the civilian aspects of Dayton threatens to render the electoral process meaningless. Cotti himself added that the vote could face "serious problems" if Serbian war criminals remain in power, AFP reported on 25 June. The Clinton administration and some other Western governments have been pressuring the OSCE to press ahead with the elections regardless. The White House wants the vote out of the way before the U.S. elections in November. -- Patrick Moore

    [16] BOSNIAN SERB TOWN TO EXPAND ASSEMBLY TO REFLECT CHANGES.

    The Bosnian elections, in any event, are to be based on the prewar demographic situation, as is clearly specified in the Dayton agreement. The Derventa authorities, however, are going ahead and expanding the local assembly from 26 members to 50. This will reflect the huge growth in the north-central Bosnian town's population after four years of the ethnic cleansing of Muslims and Croats, together with an influx of Serbs. The prewar population was 3,000, while the current total is estimated at 5,000 and growing. According to the changed and newly adopted Community Constitution, there has to be one assembly member for each thousand citizens. -- Yvonne Badal in Sarajevo and Patrick Moore

    [17] MOSTAR ELECTIONS COME OFF SMOOTHLY.

    The elections in the Herzegovinian city of Mostar are widely regarded as a test case for the Bosnian vote. The EU hopes the ballot will be the first step in uniting the divided city, which is split into the claustrophobic eastern Muslim and more prosperous western Croatian halves. First returns, however, suggest that the nationalist parties were the big winners.

    The Muslims feel they have been given short shrift in the town since the Croat- Muslim war of 1993. The Herzegovinian Croats, for their part, argue that they need Mostar, since it is the only city truly worthy of the name connected to their territories in western Herzegovina. It thus remains to be seen whether the ballot will serve its intended purpose and if the new city council -- which is slated to meet in about two weeks to elect a new mayor -- can actually achieve this aim.

    EU Administrator Ricardo Perez Casado called the ballot successful and well organized. He acknowledged that problems remain but said the vote was a significant step toward reestablishing structures that will permit political and social coexistence in the city. No major electoral irregularities were noted, and this was the first day on which freedom of movement actually was introduced in Mostar, backed by over 3,000 international troops and hundreds of Bosnian Muslim, Croatian and international police officers.

    Voter turnout was over 50% out of a population of 99,000. They cast their ballots in districts were they lived in 1991 and, therefore, many had to cross the internal border. Previous attempts to restore freedom of movement had failed, usually in the face of Croatian opposition. An attempt by the EU administration to open a bridge link between both districts earlier the year ended in disaster when Croat rioters attacked arriving Muslims and stoned then- EU administrator Hans Koschnick. Considering such problems, the EU regarded peaceful voting a major victory in itself. Thousands of refugees from Mostar also voted in Stockholm, Bonn, Bern and Oslo.

    Six slates of candidates took part in the polls. The favorites were the List for a Unified Mostar of east Mostar Mayor Safet Orucevic, and the Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ) of west Mostar Mayor Mijo Brajkovic. The EU had feared that especially the strong nationalist lobby in the HDZ might disrupt the process leading to unification of the city. The EU accordingly developed a complicated ballot system in cooperation with both sides. Seats in the municipalities or city districts will be divided according to a pre-war ethnic key. The City Council, however, will be composed of 16 Croats, 16 Muslims, and five members of other nationalities. All parties were thus forced to nominate members of Croat, Muslim and Serb nationality to be able to claim all seats they may win in the ballot. The hope remains that these candidates, who do not have the nationality of their respective ethnically defined party, will tilt the balance in favor of the creation of a unified Mostar.

    Results announced on 1 June showed that the two nationalist parties had won and that the ethnic polarization of the city was underscored. The Muslim List for a United Mostar secured some 48% of the votes while the HDZ took 45%,

    Oslobodjenje reported. AFP, however, quoted an EU official who did not want to be named as suggesting that the ballot was fraudulent by saying: "My impression is that everything has already been agreed [in advance]."

    Problems, in any event, are likely to remain. Bosnian Prime Minister Hasan Muratovic complained that some 20% of Muslims' names did not appear in the polling station's registers. A EU spokesman gave a lower figure, but Muratovic nonetheless called for new elections. -- Fabian Schmidt

    [18] U.S. SAYS ISLAMIC FIGHTERS ARE GONE FROM BOSNIA.

    Turning to military affairs, the White House announced on 26 June that Bosnia- Herzegovina has ended its "military and intelligence relationship" with Iran and that there are no "organized" foreign fighters left on government- controlled territory. This opens the way for a $70 million American program to train and equip the mainly Muslim and Croatian armed forces. The statement was issued in Lyon, France, in conjunction with the G-7 conference, news agencies reported. National Security Council spokesman Brian Cullin noted that some former Iranian fighters remain "in civilian roles, but we see no evidence of any remaining organized mujahedeen units, nor do we believe that any of the individuals remaining are engaged in military or intelligence activity." All foreign fighters were to have been out of Bosnia in January, and the lingering Iranians were a point of contention between Washington and Sarajevo. -- Patrick Moore

    [19] BOSNIAN SERB GENERAL SEES POSSIBILITY FOR CONFLICT.

    On the other side of the front lines, Bosnian Serb Gen. Manojlo Milovanovic, speaking to Pale radio on 26 June, did not rule out the possibility for renewed conflicts in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Dubbing the existing peace in the country "unstable," Milovanovic said the Bosnian Serb military's priorities include "maintaining and equipping the army.... and [safeguarding] the welfare of our soldiers," allegedly because "the very survival of the Republika Srpska depends [on such factors]." The general also timed his remarks to coincide with his Vidovdan message for 28 June, which is a holiday full of historical meaning to Serbs. -- Stan Markotich

    [20] THE REPUBLIKA SRPSKA'S "ARIZONA ROAD."

    Bijeljina, June 28. Regional security authorities have captured eight members of a gang known to have stopped and stolen eight cars on the north-south road from Zupanja to Tuzla -- known as "Arizona road" -- from Federation or foreign citizens. Among the stolen vehicles were three Mercedes, one Audi 80, one Jeep, one Golf, one Honda, and one bus for a grand total of DM 300,000 DM. The armed gang worked in groups of four, using a car without license plates and driving along the Arizona road. They would then choose their victim and block his or her passage from two directions. The cars were later sold in Serbia or, with the "help" of a mediator, sold back to the owner. (One Hungarian businessman paid DM 20,000 for the return of his jeep.) "The Arizona road", Bijeljina police official Raco Marjanovic told an OMRI reporter, "becomes a dream road for every criminal... We believe that there is a gang in Orasje [a Croatian- held town in the international corridor near the Sava River] that cooperates with the one here. This is why stolen goods can disappear so easily. All criminal activities here will continue until finally Croatian, Muslim and Serbian police cooperate. And I must admit that we in the [RS] Interior Ministry still have not gotten permission to cooperate with Federal police." -- Yvonne Badal in Sarajevo

    [21] THE KARADZIC IMBROGLIO: BILDT TRAPS HIMSELF.

    Under the constitutional amendment of the military provisions of the Dayton Peace Accord, all signatories must cooperate fully with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. No one indicted for war crimes may hold an appointed or elected public office. On 29 June, the G-7 leaders issued a statement insisting that Karadzic -- an indicted war criminal -- leave his post immediately and permanently. Some members of the international community believed Karadzic was meeting their demands. But in Pale, the reality was very different (see above).

    "What has happened in Pale over the last few days is not what the international community asked for," noted Bildt's pale-faced but adamant deputy, Michael Steiner, during the daily international press briefing in Sarajevo's Holiday Inn on 1 July. "Radovan Karadzic was reelected chairman of the ruling SDS," Steiner continued. "To me, that is clearly a public function. He is a chairman of the SDS commission that selects the candidates who will run for election. He will now appear publicly more often than he has in the last nine months. This move is an exact contradiction of what the international community requested. This status quo is intolerable and we need action. We feel that the international community must now follow its words with actions."

    IFOR Commander Admiral Leighton Smith and spokespeople for the Tribunal expressed unequivocal support for Steiner's position. "We will do everything within our mandate to remove Radovan Karadzic from any position of power," Smith promised in a written statement. In an unusually serious tone, veteran United Nations spokesman Alexander Ivanko read a one-sentence statement from the Hague: the court "would like to the remind the international community that removing Radovan Karadzic from power is just the first step on the way to The Hague."

    After the press conference, Steiner quickly answered a few questions and then rushed off to await word from an all-night session of the Pale leadership. The journalists, who for several days had demanded clarification of Bildt's position on the developments in Pale, were surprised by a statement from his spokesman, Murphy. On Friday, he had claimed that the Office of the High Representative can do very little about Karadzic's election as SDS chairman because "in a Western democratic tradition political parties are subject to private law." On Monday, however, he added that, "I am instructed to say that despite contradictory legal positions on this matter we do not consider it a private matter when Mr. Karadzic is the head of a ruling party. We do not think that it is in accordance with the spirit of Dayton."

    But there were more surprises ahead. Murphy also confirmed that Bildt had drafted Karadzic's resignation letter, which is identical to the text that was prepared in May when Karadzic refused to sign the letter and only offered a verbal promise to step down, followed by a formal transfer of "some of the presidential powers" to Vice President Biljana Plavsic. The text, promising transfer of presidential powers without mentioning resignation, uses the same wording of the Republika Srpska constitution[22] .

    Bildt, according to Murphy, thought that such a step-by-step approach has the most chance of being carried out. Murphy did not want to elaborate on why Bildt did not simply ask for Karadzic's resignation, which is also possible under the Republika Srpska constitution. As one Western diplomat commented: "Bildt has been sending totally confusing messages to everybody for so long, that no one took him seriously anymore. Now he trapped himself. He asked Karadzic to sign a document that was prepared by the Office of the High Representative. After a month of negotiations he gets a signature and then says it is not enough. How can Pale understand that? If it would be a policy, it would be a wonderful dirty trick, teaching Pale that they are not the only ones who know how to play such a game. But I am afraid it is just another one of Bildt's chaotic moves. Unlike others, this one could and should work."

    Karadzic's SDS commission will submit their final list of candidates for the 14 September elections to the Organization for Security and Cooperation on 4 July. -- Jan Urban in Sarajevo

    Compiled by Patrick Moore


    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz.


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