Browse through our Interesting Nodes on Classical Greece A)? GHT="50">
Compact version
Today's Suggestion
Read The "Macedonian Question" (by Maria Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou)
HomeAbout HR-NetNewsWeb SitesDocumentsOnline HelpUsage InformationContact us
Friday, 13 December 2019
 
News
  Latest News (All)
     From Greece
     From Cyprus
     From Europe
     From Balkans
     From Turkey
     From USA
  Announcements
  World Press
  News Archives
Web Sites
  Hosted
  Mirrored
  Interesting Nodes
Documents
  Special Topics
  Treaties, Conventions
  Constitutions
  U.S. Agencies
  Cyprus Problem
  Other
Services
  Personal NewsPaper
  Greek Fonts
  Tools
  F.A.Q.
 

RFE/RL Newsline, Vol. 3, No. 6, 00-01-10

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: Newsline Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty <http://www.rferl.org>

RFE/RL NEWSLINE

Vol. 3, No. 6, 10 January 2000


CONTENTS

[A] TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

  • [01] ARMENIAN TV OFFICIAL CHARGED IN PARLIAMENT
  • [02] ...AMID PROTESTS THAT HIS ARREST UNWARRANTED
  • [03] ARMENIAN, KARABAKH PRESIDENTS MEET
  • [04] GEORGIAN DISPLACED PERSONS THREATEN NEW WAR IN
  • [05] JUDGES IN GEORGIA THREATEN TO RESIGN OVER SALARY
  • [06] AZERBAIJAN REJECTS RUSSIAN ACCUSATIONS
  • [07] KAZAKH OPPOSITION COMMENTS OF PRESIDENTIAL POLL
  • [08] KYRGYZ COMMUNISTS TO RUN ALONE IN
  • [09] OPPOSITION POLITICIAN ARRESTED IN TURKMENISTAN
  • [10] UZBEKISTAN'S PRESIDENT RE-ELECTED

  • [B] SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

  • [11] SERBIAN OPPOSITION SEEKS JOINT PLATFORM
  • [12] MILOSEVIC FREES SERBIAN CARE WORKER
  • [13] HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH BLASTS NATO OVER SERBIAN
  • [14] UNMIK TURNS DOWN DONATION FROM KOSOVAR
  • [15] ALBANIA WANTS OFFICE IN PRISHTINA
  • [16] MORE SHOOTINGS IN LAWLESS ALBANIAN VILLAGE
  • [17] RIFT IN MONTENEGRIN COALITION?
  • [18] WAR CRIMNALS INCLUDED IN BOSNIAN SERB AWARDS
  • [19] CROATIAN PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN BEGINS
  • [20] SLOVENIA TO UPGRADE PROCEDURES AT KRSKO
  • [21] BULGARIA DENIES INTENTION TO DISMISS CHIEF OF
  • [22] BULGARIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY LEADER DEAD

  • [C] END NOTE

  • [23] Former Soviet Defense Minister Dmitrii Yazov Speaks

  • [A] TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

    [01] ARMENIAN TV OFFICIAL CHARGED IN PARLIAMENT

    SHOOTINGS...

    A Yerevan district court ruled on 7 January

    that the detention two days earlier of National Television

    deputy director Harutiun Harutiunian was justified. The

    following day, it formally charged him with complicity in the 27

    October Armenian parliament shootings, RFE/RL's Yerevan

    bureau and ITAR-TASS reported. A senior prosecutor told

    RFE/RL that the charges against Harutiunian are based on

    testimony given by Nairi Hunanian, the leader of the five

    gunmen who perpetrated the killings. LF

    [02] ...AMID PROTESTS THAT HIS ARREST UNWARRANTED

    The director and staff of Armenian National Television have

    condemned Harutiunian's arrest as "incomprehensible" and

    politically motivated. Director Tigran Naghdalian, who is close

    to President Robert Kocharian, said the prosecutors are

    being manipulated by the president's political foes, including

    supporters of former President Levon Ter-Petrossian. Vahan

    Hovannisian, one of the leaders of the Armenian Revolutionary

    Federation--Dashnaktsutyun, to which Harutiunian belongs,

    told RFE/RL the charges are unfounded. He added that by

    making such unwarranted arrests the investigators "in no way

    contribute to an atmosphere of mutual trust" in Armenia. The

    Armenian National Scout Association, of which Harutiunian is a

    leader, issued a statement on 8 January expressing the

    conviction that Harutiunian is innocent and that an impartial

    inquiry will establish those responsible for the murders and

    lead to Harutiunian's release. LF

    [03] ARMENIAN, KARABAKH PRESIDENTS MEET

    Kocharian held

    talks in Stepanakert on 7 January with Arkadii Ghukasian,

    president of the unrecognized Nagorno-Karabakh Republic,

    RFE/RL's Stepanakert correspondent reported. Kocharian's

    visit to Stepanakert was said to be a private one, pegged to

    the first anniversary of his brother's death in a hang-gliding

    accident, but he also met with the enclave's Prime Minister

    Anoushavan Danielian and with district administrators,

    according to Snark. Also on 7 January, Ghukasian named the

    unrecognized republic's defense minister, Seyran Ohanian, as

    commander of the Karabakh Defense Army. LF

    [04] GEORGIAN DISPLACED PERSONS THREATEN NEW WAR IN

    ABKHAZIA

    The Interim Committee for the Liberation of

    Abkhazia has warned that it will resort to hostilities to return

    Abkhazia to Georgian control if there are no results from its

    Internet appeal for help in doing so by political means,

    Caucasus Press reported on 10 January citing "Meridiani." The

    committee was formed on 1 January by Georgian displaced

    persons from Abkhazia. One of its member is Zurab Samushia,

    leader of the White Legion guerrillas, who have targeted

    both CIS peacekeepers and, more recently, Abkhaz police.

    Former Georgian Defense Minister Tengiz Kitovani, who set

    out in January 1995 to liberate Abkhazia by force, was

    intercepted by Georgian government forces and

    subsequently brought to trial on charges of creating an illegal

    armed force (see "OMRI Daily Digest," 9 October 1996). LF

    [05] JUDGES IN GEORGIA THREATEN TO RESIGN OVER SALARY

    ARREARS

    Members of Georgia's Council of Justice told

    journalists in Tbilisi on 7 January that they will resign in

    protest if the Georgian authorities fail to pay judges' salaries

    regularly and promptly, Caucasus Press reported. Mikhail

    Saakashvili, head of the majority Union of Citizens of Georgia

    parliamentary faction and one of the authors of Georgia's

    judicial reform, said that failure to pay judges on time risks

    sabotaging Georgia's legal reform and compelling judges to

    accept bribes in order to make ends meet. LF

    [06] AZERBAIJAN REJECTS RUSSIAN ACCUSATIONS

    Azerbaijan's Foreign Ministry issued a statement on 8 January

    rejecting as "a flagrant provocation and falsification" claims

    made the previous day by the Russian Defense Ministry that

    Chechens are creating "a bridgehead" in Azerbaijan in

    preparation for a protracted war, Interfax reported. The

    Foreign Ministry statement also called the accusations an

    attempt to aggravate Russian-Azerbaijani relations and to

    draw Azerbaijan into the fighting in the North Caucasus.

    Azerbaijan's National Security Ministry had issued a similar

    denial on 7 January (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 7 January 2000).

    Security Ministry spokesman Araz Kurbanov suggested that

    the Russian claims were intended to create the rationale for

    extending military operations to Azerbaijan, according to

    ITAR-TASS. He pointed out that Azerbaijan is separated from

    Chechnya by a 200 kilometer stretch of Daghestani territory.

    LF

    [07] KAZAKH OPPOSITION COMMENTS OF PRESIDENTIAL POLL

    ANNIVERSARY

    Opposition politicians questioned by RFE/RL

    correspondents in Almaty and Astana on 10 January were

    generally restrained in their evaluations of developments

    since Nursultan Nazarbaev's reelection as president one year

    earlier. Communist Party leader and defeated rival

    presidential candidate Serikbolsyn Abdidin said he sees no

    positive changes in the country, while Serik Abdarahmanov

    characterized his own election and that of other opposition

    figures to the new Kazakh parliament as progress. People on

    the streets were mostly negative in their assessments of

    developments since the presidential poll. LF

    [08] KYRGYZ COMMUNISTS TO RUN ALONE IN

    PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS

    Absamat Masaliev, who is

    chairman of the Party of Communists of Kyrgyzstan and a

    former first secretary (in the 1980s) of the Kirghiz

    Communist Party, said in Bishkek on 8 January that his party

    will not align with any other to contend the 20 February

    parliamentary elections, RFE/RL's Bishkek bureau reported.

    The Communists are the largest political party in Kyrgyzstan.

    The Communist Party of Kyrgyzstan, which spilt from the

    Party of Communists of Kyrgyzstan last year, was formally

    registered only in September 1999 and thus is not eligible to

    contest the poll under the proportional (party list) system.

    Its chairwoman, Klara Ajybekova, told RFE/RL that she will run

    in a single-mandate constituency in Bishkek. LF

    [09] OPPOSITION POLITICIAN ARRESTED IN TURKMENISTAN

    Nurberdi Nurmamedov, the 57-year-old joint leader of the

    unregistered Agzybirlik (Unity) opposition party, was

    arrested in Ashgabat on 5 January on charges of illegal

    possession of drugs and weapons after a police search of

    his home, RFE/RL's Turkmen Service reported two days later.

    Nurmamedov had criticized the conduct of the 12 December

    parliamentary elections and the decision late last month by

    the Turkmen parliament to amend the country's constitution

    to allow one individual to serve more than two consecutive

    presidential terms (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 30 December

    1999). Human Rights Watch issued a press release on 7

    January condemning Nurmamedov's detention. LF

    [10] UZBEKISTAN'S PRESIDENT RE-ELECTED

    Incumbent Islam

    Karimov was re-elected for another five-year term on 9

    January with 91.9 percent of the vote, Reuters reported. His

    only rival, philosopher and People's Democratic Party leader

    Abdulhafiz Dzhalalov, won 4.17 percent of the vote. Turnout

    among the 12.7 million electorate was estimated at

    approximately 95 percent. Karimov said after casting his own

    vote that he considers his "main aim" to be further political,

    social, and economic liberalization, according to Reuters.

    Some 100 foreign and 20,000 domestic observers monitored

    the poll, but the OSCE declined to dispatch a monitoring

    mission on the grounds that voters were not offered "a

    genuine choice" (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 7 January 2000). LF


    [B] SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [11] SERBIAN OPPOSITION SEEKS JOINT PLATFORM

    Representatives of 16 opposition parties met at the

    headquarters of Vuk Draskovic's Serbian Renewal Movement

    (SPO) on 10 January to develop a joint strategy. SPO officials

    prepared two draft papers, one calling for joint street

    protests starting on 9 March and the other insisting on

    elections at all levels by the end of April. Officials of the EU

    and U.S. recently gave the fragmented opposition a two-

    month deadline to work out a joint strategy to end the rule

    of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic (see "RFE/RL

    Newsline," 20 December 1999). In Belgrade on 8 January, a

    spokesman for Draskovic dismissed recent charges by the

    state-run "Politika ekspres" and Yugoslav Information Minister

    Goran Matic questioning Draskovic's and the opposition's

    patriotism, "Danas" reported. The spokesman said that the

    regime seeks to discredit the opposition on the eve of the

    joint meeting and to divert attention from Milosevic's own

    failings. PM

    [12] MILOSEVIC FREES SERBIAN CARE WORKER

    Milosevic

    pardoned Branko Jelen, an employee of CARE whom a Serbian

    court sentenced in June for espionage along with two

    Australian colleagues (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 2 September

    1999). In September, Milosevic had pardoned the two

    Australians, who then led a campaign to free Jelen. The

    ethnic Serbian aid worker joined his colleagues in Canberra

    on 10 January. Upon arriving in his new homeland, Jelen urged

    "people around the world" to remember that thousands of

    refugees in Serbia "are still in a very desperate situation,"

    Reuters reported. PM

    [13] HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH BLASTS NATO OVER SERBIAN

    CONFLICT

    The New York-based Human Rights Watch has

    charged that NATO violated international law in its 1999 air

    campaign against Milosevic's forces, "Danas" reported on 10

    January. In Goettingen, Germany, the previous day, members

    of the Association for Peoples Under Threat heard reports

    from an unspecified number of representatives of ethnic

    minorities in Kosova, who charged that the ethnic Albanian

    majority persecutes and discriminates against them. PM

    [14] UNMIK TURNS DOWN DONATION FROM KOSOVAR

    SHADOW STATE

    UN officials in Kosova rejected an offer by

    moderate politician Bujar Bukoshi to donate just over $5

    million for Albanian-language education in the province,

    "Danas" reported on 10 December. The money comes from

    the funds of the shadow-state government, of which Bukoshi

    is prime minister. Kosova's moderate politicians, including

    Bukoshi, lost political ground in the course of 1999 to the

    more militant nationalists of the Kosova Liberation Army and

    have sought to regain influence. PM

    [15] ALBANIA WANTS OFFICE IN PRISHTINA

    The Albanian

    government has officially repeated its earlier demand to UN

    officials in Kosova that it be allowed to open an "information

    office" in the Kosovar capital, dpa reported from Tirana on 8

    January (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 18 October 1999). Foreign

    Ministry spokesman Sokol Gjoka noted that the UN is working

    on a framework that will regulate the presence of foreign

    missions in the province. He stressed that an Albanian

    government office in Prishtina "will assist in the process of

    stabilization and democratization of Kosova." PM

    [16] MORE SHOOTINGS IN LAWLESS ALBANIAN VILLAGE

    Unknown persons fired on a bus on the Athens-Tirana route

    on 9 January, wounding three passengers. Before shooting,

    the gunmen tried to stop the bus and rob it, but the driver

    refused to stop, AP reported. The incident took place near

    Lazarat in the Gjirokaster area. The town, which is a

    stronghold of the Democratic Party, became a no-go area for

    police in 1998 following several armed clashes. The

    inhabitants of Lazarat, which was a leper colony in Ottoman

    times, have a tradition of behaving as a law unto themselves

    (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 2 February 1999). PM

    [17] RIFT IN MONTENEGRIN COALITION?

    Zarko Rakcevic, who

    heads the small Social Democratic Party, said in Podgorica on

    8 January that his two coalition partners have openly allied

    themselves with the Serbian Orthodox Church against the

    latter's smaller rival, the Montenegrin Orthodox Church (see

    "RFE/RL Newsline," 7 January 2000). Rakcevic charged that

    government officials, such as Religious Affairs Minister

    Slobodan Tomovic, violate the principles of a civil society

    when they openly take the side of one Church. Rakcevic

    demanded that Tomovic resign, RFE/RL's South Slavic Service

    reported. The Social Democrat added that his party will

    "review" its membership in the coalition. PM

    [18] WAR CRIMNALS INCLUDED IN BOSNIAN SERB AWARDS

    Nikola Poplasen, who is the hard-line president of the

    Republika Srpska ousted in 1999 by the international

    community and Bosnian Serb moderates, awarded medals on

    8 January to several leading Serbian nationalists (see "RFE/RL

    Newsline," 13 September 1999). Poplasen, who refuses to

    recognize his ouster, made the awards to mark the Day of

    the Republic and a religious holiday, both of which fall on 9

    January, Tanjug reported. The Order of the Republika Srpska

    went to Croatian Serb leader Milan Martic, Serbian Deputy

    Prime Minister Vojislav Seselj, and Bosnian Serb wartime

    commander General Ratko Mladic. Poplasen granted the Order

    of Karadjordje to Bosnian Serb Generals Radislav Krstic and

    Stanislav Galic. PM

    [19] CROATIAN PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN BEGINS

    The

    campaign for the 24 January presidential vote officially got

    under way on 8 January. The Croatian Democratic

    Community's (HDZ) Mate Granic said in Dubrovnik that he will

    work to integrate Croatia into the EU and NATO, and to

    promote good relations with neighboring countries, especially

    with Bosnia. In Slavonski Brod, Stipe Mesic, who represents a

    coalition of four small opposition parties, said his coalition

    does not want a witch-hunt. He stressed, however, that

    those responsible for Croatia's problems during the HDZ's

    rule from 1990 to 2000 must be called to account. Drazen

    Budisa, who is the candidate of the leading opposition

    coalition that won the recent parliamentary election, will

    launch his campaign on 11 January. A poll published in

    "Jutarnji list" on 8 January gives Budisa 37 percent and Granic

    31 percent of the vote. Some 78 percent of the respondents

    said they plan to cast their ballot. PM

    [20] SLOVENIA TO UPGRADE PROCEDURES AT KRSKO

    Miroslav

    Gregoric, who heads Slovenia's nuclear safety department,

    told AP on 7 January that his government will improve

    inspection procedures at the country's only nuclear plant in

    line with recent recommendations by the UN's International

    Atomic Energy Agency. He did not elaborate. The plant at

    Krsko was the former Yugoslavia's only nuclear power facility.

    Croatia helped construct the plant and has a share in the use

    of its output. PM

    [21] BULGARIA DENIES INTENTION TO DISMISS CHIEF OF

    STAFF

    Responding to media reports, President Petar

    Stoyanov said on 7 January that he has no intention of

    dismissing Chief of Staff General Mikho Mikhov, adding that

    the government has not asked him to do so, BTA

    reported. Defense Minister Boyko Noev told journalists the

    same day that he intends to propose that Mikhov's term in

    office be extended by two years when it expires in June.

    For his part, Mikhov told journalists that he refuses to

    speculate about who "masterminded" the rumor of his

    dismissal. He said he has no plans to resign and that he

    first heard about the intention to extend his term at

    Noev's press conference. Mikhov said he will decide what

    to do in June. MS

    [22] BULGARIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY LEADER DEAD

    Stefan

    Savov, leader of the Democratic Party and co-chairman of

    the People's Union, died on 8 January at the age of 76,

    BTA reported. Savov, who was parliamentary chairman from

    November 1991 to September 1992, was one of the main

    architects of the revival of the Democratic Party. The

    Democrats first belonged to the Union of Democratic

    Forces and later, as part of the People's Union, to the

    ruling United Democratic Forces. MS


    [C] END NOTE

    [23] Former Soviet Defense Minister Dmitrii Yazov Speaks

    Out (Part 1)

    At the age of 76, the Soviet Union's last defense minister,

    Dmitrii Yazov, walks with greater agility than some of his 40-

    year-old colleagues. He remembers the events that took

    place in Czechoslovakia very well. Back then, he ran one of

    the strongest armies in the world.

    Today, Marshall Yazov works as an adviser to the central

    administration for international cooperation at the Russian

    Defense Ministry. This interview by Petra Prochazkova first

    appeared in the Czech daily "Lidove noviny" on 25 November

    1999.

    Q: A few days ago, all Europe celebrated the 10th

    anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the

    Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia. Do you consider

    those anniversaries to be worth celebrating as well?

    It's no tragedy, your country has a right to decide its own

    fate. But I'm not celebrating. Instead, I remembered why the

    Berlin Wall was established--because the Germans started a

    war. The fascists are to blame for all of it, and the Germans

    had to bear the responsibility for it. The Soviet Army alone

    lost 10.5 million people during the war. The Germans had to

    be divided. And why did the Americans, who protested the

    loudest against the Berlin Wall, build a 240 kilometer wall

    between South and North Korea? We left Germany in the end,

    but the Americans did not.

    Q: Because no one is pushing them to...

    And who was pushing the Russians? We were the winners! It

    was right for us to leave. But the Americans should also

    leave Europe....

    Q: Were you sorry that you were organizing the

    withdrawal of Soviet troops from all of Central and

    Eastern Europe?

    Not at all. The problem is that one group leaves, and another

    group takes its place. I knew it would turn out like that. The

    Americans didn't cross your borders in military boots, but

    they got you with money. It's enough to look at who Czech

    industry works for today and the size of the unemployment

    rate in your country. You're not better off than you were.

    The Americans don't intend to share and they're holding all of

    Europe in the palm of their hand. The Germans are paying

    them and serving them in exchange for having them on their

    territory. The Czechs never paid the Russian army for its

    stay. In 1979 and 1980, I was the chief of financial

    administration for our troops in Czechoslovakia. We had to

    pay you for every unfortunate incident, every felled tree or

    damaged highway.

    Q: You didn't regret the departure of the Soviet Army

    from Europe, but the average soldiers didn't look

    forward to going home...

    Where do you think it's better to live, in Siberia or in

    Czechoslovakia? Of course it was better for a soldier to live

    in your country. Furthermore, the Czechs had a normal

    relationship with Russian soldiers....

    Q: Were you astonished that we joined NATO?

    I never thought that the Czechs, Poles, and Hungarians would

    join NATO. [Former Soviet leader Mikhail] Gorbachev made a

    big mistake when he failed to sign a written agreement with

    the Americans that NATO cannot move eastward. Only a

    verbal agreement existed. Gorbachev knew that it didn't

    guarantee anything. Today, a swindler has turned into a

    hero....

    I experienced the year 1989 as an internal insult or

    sorrow. In the year 1945, we lost 140,000 soldiers in your

    country, and 44 years later someone comes to power and

    turns you into an enemy of the Soviet people. We never sold

    you. In 1939, we were ready to send 100 divisions to help

    you. I would recommend to all those Czechs who hate Russia

    to examine how many bones of Russian soldiers are buried in

    your country just so that it could be independent, free, and

    have its honor preserved.

    Q: So, after all, you consider it to be unjust that you

    had to leave Czechoslovakia?

    There was nothing else that could be done in 1989. I didn't

    think that our troops would be in your country forever. We

    had to return home some day. The time had come. I'm just

    surprised that the Americans can have military bases in

    Germany, Italy, Greece.... For the time being, they have only a

    fifth column in Russia. Just look how many American films are

    on television...!

    So you didn't liquidate several memorials to the Soviet

    liberators who in 1945 guarded your pioneers with pride?

    You didn't rename streets and squares, all in the name of

    democracy? As if Praguers launched their own uprising and

    freed the city with their own efforts. Why didn't you rise up in

    1942, or in 1944? You rose up after Berlin fell! Unfortunately,

    I know that you'll lose the Sudetenland once again. You'll see.

    Q: Relations between our countries didn't worsen

    after the war, but after 1968.

    Relations worsened when the Warsaw Pact fell apart. When

    the anticommunist Havel, the so-called democrat, came to

    power. Those types came to power in our country as well.

    You think that democrats are governing in Russia? Everything

    is run by an oligarchy. They have billions and the majority of

    Russian teachers are not even getting their wages. What kind

    of democracy is it when the country's God-given wealth,

    which belongs to the nation, is being sold off by oligarchs?

    Why is the state selling off gas, crude oil, and electricity from

    the power plants, which were built by the hands of the Soviet

    people? Why is some [Gazprom head Rem] Vyakhirev doing

    business with my gas? Where is your democracy?

    Translated by Victor Gomez.

    Part 2 will appear in "RFE/RL Newsline" tomorrow.

    10-01-00


    Reprinted with permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
    URL: http://www.rferl.org


    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: Newsline Directory - Previous Article - Next Article
    Back to Top
    Copyright 1995-2016 HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network). An HRI Project.
    All Rights Reserved.

    HTML by the HR-Net Group / Hellenic Resources Institute, Inc.
    rferl2html v1.01 run on Monday, 10 January 2000 - 16:42:52 UTC