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RFE/RL Newsline, Vol. 3, No. 11, 00-01-17

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: Newsline Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty <http://www.rferl.org>

RFE/RL NEWSLINE

Vol. 3, No. 11, 17 January 2000


CONTENTS

[A] TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

  • [01] ARMENIAN GOVERNMENT UNVEILS NEW DRAFT BUDGET
  • [02] ARMENIAN COMMUNIST PARTY ELECTS NEW FIRST SECRETARY
  • [03] AZERBAIJAN CREATES COMMISSION TO COORDINATE GAS PIPELINE
  • [04] TURKISH PRESIDENT CALLS FOR CAUCASUS STABILITY PACT...
  • [05] ...DISCUSSES BAKU-CEYHAN PIPELINE PROJECT
  • [06] GEORGIAN OPPOSITION SEEKS TO AMEND ELECTION LAW
  • [07] MORE OFFICIALS CHARGED IN KAZAKHSTAN MIG SALES CASE
  • [08] DOMESTIC SECURITY SITUATION DETERIORATING IN KAZAKHSTAN
  • [09] FOREIGN OIL COMPANIES CRITICIZE KAZAKH EXPORT RESTRICTIONS
  • [10] UZBEKISTAN AGAIN REDUCES GAS SUPPLIES TO KYRGYZSTAN

  • [B] SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

  • [11] ARKAN KILLED IN BELGRADE
  • [12] SERBIAN PRIVATE TELEVISION TRANSMITTER SABOTAGED
  • [13] MONTENEGRO TO SEND MILOSEVIC TO HAGUE?
  • [14] U.S. TELLS BELGRADE TO LEAVE MONTENEGRO ALONE
  • [15] U.S. COMMANDER APOLOGIZES TO KOSOVAR FAMILY
  • [16] MESIC TAKES LEAD IN CROATIAN PRESIDENTIAL POLLS
  • [17] ALBANIAN PRESIDENT NAMES NEW PRIVATIZATION CHIEF
  • [18] ROMANIA'S RULING PARTY TO STRENGTHEN CHAIRMAN'S
  • [19] ...WHICH MAY SOON BE NEEDED TO DISCIPLINE DISSENTERS...
  • [20] ... AND TO COPE WITH RENEWED PRESSURE FROM POLITICAL ALLY
  • [21] CONFLICTS EMERGE IN THE RANKS OF ROMANIA'S DEMOCRATIC PARTY
  • [22] U.S. TO FINANCE RUSSIAN ARSENAL WITHDRAWAL FROM
  • [23] MOLDOVA WALKS THE TIGHTROPE ON CHECHNYA
  • [24] EU PLEDGES HELP, SAYS BULGARIA MUST CONTINUE REFORMS
  • [25] BULGARIA REFORMS ARMY GENERAL STAFF

  • [C] END NOTE

  • [26] Running With Wolves

  • [A] TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

    [01] ARMENIAN GOVERNMENT UNVEILS NEW DRAFT BUDGET

    Armenian

    Finance Minister Levon Barkhudarian outlined the main

    parameters of the revised budget to journalists on 15

    January, prior to its submission to parliament, RFE/RL's

    Yerevan bureau reported. The volume and spending proportions

    are virtually identical to those for 1999, with expenditures

    planned at 254 billion drams ($490 million) and revenues at

    202 billion drams. The ensuing 4.3 percent deficit is lower

    than that for 1999. About one-third of the scarce public

    funds are earmarked for the social sector, and 20 percent for

    defense and law enforcement. The government expects the

    Armenian economy to expand by 6 percent under a projected 5

    percent consumer price inflation this year. Barkhudarian said

    the GDP growth last year equaled 4 percent and inflation was

    just 2 percent. LF

    [02] ARMENIAN COMMUNIST PARTY ELECTS NEW FIRST SECRETARY

    Vladimir

    Darpinian, who is 68 and served as Armenian SSR Interior

    Minister in the 1970s, was unanimously elected first

    secretary of the Armenian Communist Party on 15 January,

    RFE/RL's Yerevan bureau reported. Darpinian replaces Sergei

    Badalian, who died unexpectedly in November (see "RFE/RL

    Newsline," 29 November 1999). He pledged not to make any

    changes in the party's domestic and foreign policies. The

    Communist Party is the third largest faction in the Armenian

    parliament. LF

    [03] AZERBAIJAN CREATES COMMISSION TO COORDINATE GAS PIPELINE

    NEGOTIATIONS

    President Heidar Aliev on 14 January issued a

    decree establishing a state commission to conduct

    negotiations on drafting an intergovernmental agreement

    between Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, and Turkey on

    construction of the planned Trans-Caspian gas pipeline, Turan

    and ITAR-TASS reported. The commission will also conclude an

    agreement with the sponsors of the project. An Azerbaijani

    delegation will travel to Ashgabat on 18 January for talks on

    what percentage of the pipeline's annual capacity of 16

    billion cubic meters will be reserved for Azerbaijani gas

    from the offshore Shah Deniz deposit. LF

    [04] TURKISH PRESIDENT CALLS FOR CAUCASUS STABILITY PACT...

    Visiting Tbilisi on 14-15 January, Suleyman Demirel called

    for a Caucasus Peace and Stability Pact analogous to that

    concluded last year for the Balkans, Turan and Reuters

    reported. Demirel proposed that the pact be jointly drafted

    by all three South Caucasus states and signed by their

    presidents and those of the world's leading countries. He

    argued that stability in the Caucasus benefits not only that

    region, but also Turkey and Central Asia, and is thus in

    Europe's interest as well. Demirel warned that Georgia and

    Azerbaijan should not be drawn into the Chechen conflict. He

    expressly excluded Chechnya from the stability pact,

    according to Reuters. LF

    [05] ...DISCUSSES BAKU-CEYHAN PIPELINE PROJECT

    Demirel also

    discussed with Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze

    construction of the planned Baku-Ceyhan export pipeline for

    Caspian oil. Since the signing in Istanbul in November of

    four framework agreements on that pipeline, Tbilisi had

    demanded amendments to absolve it of financial responsibility

    for damage caused to the Georgian section of the pipeline by

    force-majeur accidents. Georgia had also demanded financial

    compensation for the owners of land which the pipeline will

    transit, European-standard ecological safeguards, and 2-3

    percent of the crude oil exported through the pipeline.

    Demirel told journalists on 15 January that Ankara had agreed

    to all those demands, Reuters reported. Giorgi Chanturia,

    head of the Georgian International Operating Company that

    will operate the Georgian section of the pipeline, said that

    Georgia is prepared to use 50 percent of the transit fees it

    receives to finance the security of the pipeline, according

    to Turan. LF

    [06] GEORGIAN OPPOSITION SEEKS TO AMEND ELECTION LAW

    The five

    opposition parties aligned in the Union for Georgian Revival

    bloc decided late on 16 January to submit an alternative

    election law to the Georgian parliament committee for

    constitutional and juridical issues, Caucasus Press reported.

    At the same time, the bloc will begin collecting the 50,000

    signatures needed to demand a referendum on their proposed

    amended version of the law. If their demands to amend the law

    are rejected, the bloc may boycott the 9 April presidential

    election, for which they have not yet formally proposed a

    candidate. LF

    [07] MORE OFFICIALS CHARGED IN KAZAKHSTAN MIG SALES CASE

    Criminal

    charges have been brought against Asker Gabdulin, former

    director of the Metallist defense plant in Kazakhstan which

    sold obsolete MiG fighter aircraft to Agroplast of the Czech

    Republic for resale to North Korea, and against two Czech

    Agroplast officials, Interfax reported on 14 January. Whether

    they will be brought to trial is, however, uncertain.

    Gabdulin's whereabouts are unknown, and the Czech Republic

    has not yet responded to a Kazakh request to extradite the

    two Agroplast officials. LF

    [08] DOMESTIC SECURITY SITUATION DETERIORATING IN KAZAKHSTAN

    Kazakhstan's National Security Committee chairman, Major

    General Alnur Musaev, told journalists in Astana on 14

    January that the conflict potential on Kazakhstan's southern

    borders and in the Caucasus is negatively affecting the

    security situation in the country, Interfax reported. He said

    that in 1999 34 foreign nationals were expelled from

    Kazakhstan for espionage. LF

    [09] FOREIGN OIL COMPANIES CRITICIZE KAZAKH EXPORT RESTRICTIONS

    The Kazakhstan Petroleum Association, which represents

    foreign oil companies engaged in Kazakhstan, is concerned by

    the Kazakh government's decision to limit the amount of crude

    that may be exported this year to 22 million metric tons,

    Interfax reported on 14 January. The rationale for the

    restriction is to ensure that Kazakhstan's three refineries

    work at full capacity. The Association's chairman, Edward

    Verona, told journalists in Almaty on 14 January that annual

    production is estimated at 30 million metric tons, and that

    the association's members have no interest in selling the

    surplus 8 million tons of oil to the Kazakh government at

    less than world market prices. He welcomed the government's

    readiness for talks on the issue and expressed the hope that

    a compromise agreement will be reached. LF

    [10] UZBEKISTAN AGAIN REDUCES GAS SUPPLIES TO KYRGYZSTAN

    Uzbekistan on 15 January again reduced gas supplies to

    neighboring Kyrgyzstan to a minimum in retaliation for

    Bishkek's failure to pay its outstanding $400,000 debt for

    earlier supplies, ITAR-TASS and AP reported. Most private

    homes in Bishkek and other areas of northern Kyrgyzstan were

    without gas or heating as most of Kyrgyzstan's thermal plants

    are gas fired. LF


    [B] SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [11] ARKAN KILLED IN BELGRADE

    An unknown gunman or gunmen killed

    Zeljko Raznatovic "Arkan" and two men accompanying him at

    Belgrade's Intercontinental Hotel on 15 January. The killer

    or killers vanished, and police have yet to report any leads.

    Observers note that the indicted war criminal had many

    enemies in the gangster underworld who would have liked to

    see him eliminated. Speculation also centers on the

    possibility that his killing may have been politically

    motivated because he "knew too much" about Yugoslav President

    Slobodan Milosevic and his involvement in war crimes and the

    underworld (see "End Note" below). On 16 January, U.S.

    Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said in Panama City

    that she would have preferred that Arkan "stand trial in The

    Hague for his crimes." In London, British Foreign Secretary

    Robin Cook expressed similar views, as did Mirza Hajric--an

    aide to Bosnian Muslim leader Alija Izetbegovic--in Sarajevo.

    Hajric added that the regime probably wanted Arkan out of the

    way. In Belgrade, opposition leader Vuk Draskovic took a

    similar position. PM

    [12] SERBIAN PRIVATE TELEVISION TRANSMITTER SABOTAGED

    On 16

    January, unknown persons damaged a transmitter on Mt. Kosmaj

    belonging to Studio B Television, which is the voice of Vuk

    Draskovic's Serbian Renewal Movement (SPO). The intruders

    also took equipment valued at more than $50,000, Reuters

    reported. As a result of the damage, the station's signal

    cannot be received outside Belgrade. A spokesman for the SPO

    said that the damage to the transmitter was an act of "state

    terrorism" by the regime. Observers note that the Milosevic

    regime has always placed great weight on its control of the

    airwaves. PM

    [13] MONTENEGRO TO SEND MILOSEVIC TO HAGUE?

    Montenegrin President

    Milo Djukanovic told private Belgrade Radio B2-92 on 15

    January that he does not rule out the possibility that

    Montenegro would extradite Milosevic to The Hague were the

    indicted war criminal to arrive in Montenegro. Djukanovic

    said that his government will do everything it can to

    cooperate with The Hague-based war crimes tribunal. PM

    [14] U.S. TELLS BELGRADE TO LEAVE MONTENEGRO ALONE

    U.S.

    Undersecretary of Defense Walter Slocombe said in Tirana on

    14 January that it would be a "serious mistake" for Belgrade

    to interfere in Montenegro's internal affairs. He stressed,

    however, that "we are confident that with good sense from all

    sides, a crisis could be avoided," Reuters reported. Slocombe

    also warned Belgrade against trying to reintroduce its forces

    into Kosova. Serbian forces left the province in June under

    an agreement with NATO. Top Belgrade civilian and military

    officials regularly call for their return "to protect Serbian

    lives and property." PM

    [15] U.S. COMMANDER APOLOGIZES TO KOSOVAR FAMILY

    Brigadier

    General Ricardo Sanchez, who commands U.S. forces serving

    with KFOR, sent a message of condolence on 17 January to the

    family of an 11-year-old ethnic Albanian girl. She had

    reportedly been raped and killed by a U.S. serviceman the

    week. Staff Sergeant. Frank J. Ronghi has been charged in the

    case and is under arrest. Sanchez stressed in his message

    that "the Department of the Army will spare no effort in

    bringing this matter to justice," AP reported from Vitina. PM

    [16] MESIC TAKES LEAD IN CROATIAN PRESIDENTIAL POLLS

    Two new

    public opinion polls indicate that Stipe Mesic, who

    represents a coalition of four small opposition parties, has

    acquired a lead ranging between four and eight percentage

    points over Drazen Budisa, who is the candidate of the larger

    two-party opposition coalition. Budisa in turn is ahead of

    the Croatian Democratic Community's (HDZ) Mate Granic by at

    least five percentage points. RFE/RL's South Slavic Service

    reported the one poll on 15 January, while "Vecernji list"

    ran the second one two days later. The Zagreb daily quoted

    Mesic as saying that he is confident of victory and that the

    poll results vindicate him for his support over the years for

    the rule of law and for European democratic standards.

    Reuters on 14 January quoted him as saying that by electing

    him president, voters will complete the ouster of the HDZ but

    also prevent the large coalition from monopolizing the top

    offices. PM

    [17] ALBANIAN PRESIDENT NAMES NEW PRIVATIZATION CHIEF

    Rexhep

    Meidani approved Prime Minister Ilir Meta's nomination of

    Mustafa Muci as minister of privatization on 15 January,

    Reuters reported (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 12 January 2000). In

    other news, police arrested two of their colleagues near

    Ballsh, south of Tirana, on 14 January for cutting power

    lines. The men apparently committed the act of sabotage to

    increase local discontent with the Socialist-led government,

    dpa reported. PM

    [18] ROMANIA'S RULING PARTY TO STRENGTHEN CHAIRMAN'S

    PREROGATIVES...

    The prerogatives of the National Peasant

    Party Christian Democratic (PNTCD) chairman are to be

    widened, according to new party statutes that are to be

    submitted for approval to the party's Permanent Delegation at

    the end of this month, Mediafax reported on 14 January.

    According to the new statutes, the PNTCD chairman will

    automatically become the party's candidate for the post of

    premier. If he declines the position, the chairman,

    octogenarian Ion Diaconescu, will designate the person to

    fill that position, as well as the ministers representing the

    party in the cabinet, after consultations with the PNTCD's

    leading bodies. The new statutes are said to reflect the

    "lessons derived from the Radu Vasile episode." MS

    [19] ...WHICH MAY SOON BE NEEDED TO DISCIPLINE DISSENTERS...

    Also

    on 14 January, PNTCD vice-chairman Sorin Lepsa, a Vasile

    supporter, said the former premier's exclusion from the party

    was an infringement of its statutes and that the party has

    "strayed away from its Christian Democratic doctrine" and has

    "dramatically" lost support since Vasile's exclusion. Lepsa

    said that unless the Permanent Delegation will "clarify the

    situation and return the party to its path," the PNTCD will

    be "condemned." MS

    [20] ... AND TO COPE WITH RENEWED PRESSURE FROM POLITICAL ALLY

    In

    an interview with Mediafax on 14 January, National Liberal

    Party (PNL) First Deputy Chairman Valeriu Stoica said the PNL

    will resume negotiations at the end of the month with the

    PNTCD on participating on separate lists in local elections

    due later this year and on signing a new protocol of the

    Democratic Convention of Romania (CDR), of which both parties

    are the main components. Stoica said the CDR may continue to

    function as an alliance for the parliamentary elections--also

    due in 2000-- and that if the PNTCD will reject his party's

    proposals "we shall behave just as they do, that is to say we

    shall also refuse to negotiate." MS

    [21] CONFLICTS EMERGE IN THE RANKS OF ROMANIA'S DEMOCRATIC PARTY

    AS WELL

    Democratic Party spokesman Dumitru Moinescu on 14

    January said Deputy Chairman Traian Basescu "should explain"

    to Chairman Petre Roman what he meant in a recent interview

    with the daily "Adevarul" in which he said that as foreign

    minister, Roman has "less time for party affairs" and that

    this was good for the party. Basescu said in reaction that

    Moinescu "acts like a typical apparatchik, ready to always

    deny what he believes does not serve the party." He said that

    Roman "is well over the period when he was ready to hear only

    positive things about the party" and added that "if the

    Democrats are now supported by only 4.3 percent of the

    electorate, this is also due to people like Moinescu, who

    prove that second-rank party officials are incapable of

    substituting for the first rank." MS

    [22] U.S. TO FINANCE RUSSIAN ARSENAL WITHDRAWAL FROM

    TRANSDNIESTER?

    U.S. Ambassador to Moldova Rudolf Perina told

    journalists on 14 January that his country is ready to

    contribute $30 million to finance the evacuation of the

    Russian arsenal from Transdniester, RFE/RL's Chisinau bureau

    reported. Perina spoke after a meeting on 13 January with

    separatist leader Igor Smirnov. He also said that the U.S.

    supports the idea of having an OSCE group of experts evaluate

    the arsenal's volume and the state of the weaponry. Perina

    said he had offered Smirnov to extend the aid of U.S. coal

    deliveries to Transdniester. Smirnov said in reaction that

    there is no reason for "foreign missions" to deal with the

    arsenal which now "belongs to the Transdniester people" and

    that its evaluation "is the competence of the Russian

    Federation" which maintains an "operative group" in the

    region. MS

    [23] MOLDOVA WALKS THE TIGHTROPE ON CHECHNYA

    "Moldova will

    continue accepting Chechen refugees and render possible

    assistance in solving humanitarian problems. At the same

    time, its leadership condemns terrorism and secessionism, and

    does not intend to grant refugee status to persons suspected

    of terrorism," a press release of the presidential office

    cited by ITAR-TASS said on 16 January. Earlier, Valerii

    Klinenko, leader of the Moldovan Congress of Russian

    Communities, warned that refugees from Chechnya could

    reinforce local criminal groups and that Moldova "might be

    dragged into political adventure if it gives sanctuary to the

    Chechens." MS

    [24] EU PLEDGES HELP, SAYS BULGARIA MUST CONTINUE REFORMS

    The EU

    will "do its best to support the country's preparations for

    accession" and Bulgaria will receive funds totaling 1.8

    billion euro ($1.84 billion) till 2006 for this purpose,

    European Commission President Romano Prodi told Bulgaria's

    parliamentarians on 14 January. Addressing the legislature,

    Prodi also said Bulgaria will need to "make further efforts

    in reforming its economy." He praised the government's

    decision to close down the Kozloduy nuclear plant, describing

    the agreement between Sofia and Brussels as "painful, but

    necessary," BTA and AP reported. MS

    [25] BULGARIA REFORMS ARMY GENERAL STAFF

    As of 1 March, the

    structure of Bulgaria's' General Staff will be reformed. The

    staff will have six, instead of nine directorates, and two,

    instead of three deputy chiefs. It will have a total staff of

    372, Bulgarian radio, cited by the BBC, reported on 14

    January. MS


    [C] END NOTE

    [26] Running With Wolves

    By Patrick Moore

    The murder of Zeljko Raznatovic "Arkan" is but the

    latest event to draw attention to the murky side of Yugoslav

    President Slobodan Milosevic's Serbia. The killing raises

    more questions that it does answers.

    On 15 January, an unknown gunman or gunmen shot Arkan

    through the left eye at Belgrade's Intercontinental Hotel.

    Doctors pronounced him dead on arrival at the hospital. A

    second underworld figure accompanying Arkan was also killed,

    and a bodyguard later succumbed to his wounds.

    Two days later, the police had announced no lead on the

    killers. The independent daily "Danas" suggested that the

    person or persons involved had fled in a waiting car, which

    drove onto the highway linking Belgrade and Zagreb. The paper

    also noted that the killing was thoroughly professional.

    Arkan embodied a dark area of Serbian public life where

    politics, crime, intelligence and police work, paramilitary

    groups, business, sport, and entertainment come together. The

    son of a Serbian military officer, he was born in Slovenia on

    17 April 1952. His life involved a history of criminal

    activity together with work for Belgrade's undercover

    services; in short, a double life. In communist times, for

    example, he combined bank robbery in Sweden with activities

    against Croatian emigres there.

    His years in the West earned him a place on Interpol's

    wanted list, but it is for his activities of the past ten

    years--that is, during the Milosevic era--that he is best

    known. He led a paramilitary formation called the Tigers in

    the conflicts in Croatia and Bosnia, and played a role in

    organizing the paramilitary "police" of the Serbian Interior

    Ministry in Kosova as well. Arkan and his men were known for

    brutality even by the standards of the Serbian

    paramilitaries, and were instrumental in the ethnic cleansing

    of eastern Bosnia in early 1992. In 1997, the Hague-based war

    crimes tribunal indicted him for crimes against humanity.

    But Arkan had other interests as well. Wartime Serbia

    and its sanctions provided abundant opportunities for

    smuggling and other illicit business activities, at which

    Arkan excelled. As the cosmopolitan and intellectual class

    that had long given Belgrade a distinctive image emigrated or

    struggled to make ends meet, the city increasingly acquired

    the imprint of the new mafia class.

    Arkan was but one of the more famous of these men. He

    also owned the Obilic soccer club and was married to the

    flamboyant pop star Cvetlana Velickovic "Ceca." Her genre is

    known as "turbo folk" and is particularly associated with the

    popular culture of Milosevic's wars in the early 1990s. She

    was his third wife and bore him the last two of his nine

    children.

    A man of pronounced Serbian nationalist views, he headed

    the small pro-Milosevic Party of Serbian Unity. Arkan claimed

    to have no ties to Milosevic, who in turn kept his distance

    in public from the man whom many regarded as his lieutenant

    and chief executioner. U.S. Ambassador Richard Holbrooke

    noted in his memoirs that Milosevic dismissed any question of

    Arkan's activities as a "peanut issue." But Holbrooke also

    recalled that Milosevic was nonetheless "annoyed" over the

    American's criticism of Arkan in a way that Milosevic was not

    bothered by remarks about Radovan Karadzic or General Ratko

    Mladic.*

    This leads to the question of who might have been behind

    the murder, and whether that someone could just be Milosevic.

    A number of factors point in this direction, although the

    truth may never be known. First, Arkan knew quite a lot about

    the Serbian leader's activities over many long years. After

    learning of Arkan's murder, Mirza Hajric--who is an aide to

    Muslim leader Alija Izetbegovic--said in Sarajevo that

    "someone was making sure that one of the key people who knew

    too much should not live too long," AP reported. In line with

    this possibility, one may recall unconfirmed press reports

    last year that Arkan was allegedly trying to plea-bargain

    with the war crimes tribunal.

    Second, Arkan's was not the first mysterious murder of a

    person from this particularly complex corner of the Belgrade

    underworld. Since 1992, there have been 10 unsolved murders

    of very prominent Serbs--some, but not all, with criminal

    connections--who knew a lot about Milosevic and his

    activities. "The Guardian" pointed out on 17 January that

    some of these individuals--such as Jovica Stanisic and Franko

    Simatovic "Frenki"--are still reported to be living in

    Belgrade and may now be rather concerned about their futures.

    And third, the regime's reaction to the latest

    spectacular murder has been rather curious. Hours went by

    without any commentary. When the regime media did report the

    story, they played it down. Since then, official Belgrade

    seems at a loss for words. But perhaps it may soon launch a

    new conspiracy theory of its own, in which the alleged

    killers come from the ranks of Milosevic's enemies and have

    foreign connections.

    In any event, whether or not one accepts the theory that

    the regime was behind the killing of Arkan, it is clear that

    the Milosevic era has led to a growth of gangland killings

    and a culture of guns and violence in the Serbian capital.

    One theory making the rounds in Belgrade is that Arkan had

    clashed with Marko Milosevic, the president's "businessman"

    son, over turf in the gasoline trade. Other theories focus on

    other aspects of Arkan's business dealings, including a

    desire for revenge by families of his deceased enemies. In

    short, it is clear that Arkan knew no shortage of people who

    had possible reason to do him in.

    What is also certain is that he will never testify in

    The Hague, and the truth about many of his activities will go

    with him to the grave. Jacques Klein, who is the UN's chief

    representative in Bosnia, called Arkan a "coward and a

    psychopath." Klein added that "the sad part of all this is

    that he was not actually brought to justice, that he was not

    brought to The Hague."

    * Richard Holbrooke, "To End A War," ( New York: Random

    House, 1998), p. 190.

    17-01-00


    Reprinted with permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
    URL: http://www.rferl.org


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