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Washington, April 9: Dumbarton Oaks lecture on Byzantine Amorium

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From: "HR-Net News Distribution Manager" <dist@hri.org>

Originally From: Connie Mourtoupalas <mourtoupala@greekembassy.org>

DUMBARTON OAKS - Program in Byzantine Studies

Invites you to a lecture by

Dr. Christopher Lightfoot

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

"Life and Death at Amorium: The Archaeology of a Byzantine City" An illustrated public lecture jointly sponsored by Dumbarton Oaks' Program in Byzantine Studies and The Archeological Institute of America

Wednesday, April 9, 2002 - 5:30 p.m. 
The Museum Room
Dumbarton Oaks
1703 - 32nd Street, NW
Washington, DC
202-339-6940

The Amorium Excavations Project, funded in part by Dumbarton Oaks since 1995, has sought to concentrate its investigations on the Byzantine city of the 7th through 11th centuries. A wealth of evidence has been produced, revealing how the city survived the collapse of the eastern Roman Empire in the mid-7th century and rose to become a major provincial capital and Byzantine stronghold. Although it suffered a devastating siege in 838, Amorium continued to prosper until around the time of the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. Work in the Lower City has exposed not only a large and important church, but also part of the city defenses, and, more recently, an impressive baths complex. The evidence from these buildings, and from other finds from the site, has shown that there was a continuing cycle of decay and reconstruction in the city, mirroring the daily life of its inhabitants.


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