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TRKNWS-L Turkish Press Review (December 21, 1995)

From: "Demetrios E. Paneras" <dep@bu.edu>

Turkish News Directory

CONTENTS

  • [01] BIRECIK DAM: NEW TROUBLE SPOT BETWEEN TURKEY AND SYRIA

  • [02] STRONGER TIES WITH POLAND

  • [03] FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM THE EU

  • [04] ANKARA NONCOMMITTAL ON HOLBROOKE VISIT

  • [05] SWISS MODEL FOR CYPRUS

  • [06] TURKEY SHOULD TRAIN BOSNIAN MILITARY

  • [07] FOUR PKK MILITANTS KILLED IN SOUTHEAST

  • [08] AMNESTY CONDEMNS PKK

  • [09] HABITAT BRIGHTENED WITH MUSIC

  • [10] TURSAB TO ORGANIZE ABTA GENERAL ASSEMBLY


  • TURKISH PRESS REVIEW

    THURSDAY DECEMBER 21, 1995

    Summary of the political and economic news in the Turkish press this morning

    [01] BIRECIK DAM: NEW TROUBLE SPOT BETWEEN TURKEY AND SYRIA

    The finalization of a credit agreement for the Birecik Dam on the Euphrates river has become a new trouble spot between Turkey and Syria. The dispute has led Syria to start lobbying against Turkey not only in the Arab League, but also in Western countries. "The Syria's claim that Euphrates river water which flows downstream to Syria is polluted, is irrelevant" Foreign Ministry Spokesman Omer Akbel said in his weekly press conference yesterday. Turkey's proposal of a three-stage plan to solve the water problem between Turkey, Syria and Iraq includes measures to avert pollution of the river water. However, this plan, which aims to take up the water question "on a scientific and technical basis" -rather than the 'political and high level' way Syria and Iraq have demanded- has not been accepted by those two countries. The plan, which was first put forward in 1990, first calls for inventory studies of water resources, then inventory studies of land resources, and finally the determination of the irrigation types and systems for planned projects aimed at minimizing water losses.

    Akbel also denied that Syria was uninformed on the construction of Birecik Dam, saying that all technical information had been given to Syria since 1983. Ankara had committed itself, under a protocol signed between Turkey and Syria in 1987, to give Syria 500 cubic meters of water per second. /Hurriyet/

    [02] STRONGER TIES WITH POLAND

    Talking about ties between Poland and Turkey, outgoing President Lech Walesa said that both countries had an important role to play in the region. Both countries possessed huge potential strategically and with growing young, and dynamic populations, the economic future of both Turkey and Poland looked bright.

    Walesa stressed that Poland and Turkey could best help the region by "exporting stability" to other countries. He noted that by showing tolerance towards the beliefs and cultures of others, Turkey and Poland could set an example that would help to restore growth and development in other regional countries. /Milliyet/

    [03] FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM THE EU

    With the the Customs Union coming into effect on January 1, 1996, the European Union will extend to Turkey credits worth 1.8 billion ECU, or approximately $1.8 billion. A part of the credit, amounting to 375 million ECU will be used in support of small and middle-range projects and to ensure coordination and cooperation between the Turkish and European customs implementations. Another 400 million ECU will be extended by the European Investment Bank to finance the implementation of the revised Mediterranean Programme. /Sabah/

    [04] ANKARA NONCOMMITTAL ON HOLBROOKE VISIT

    Ankara remained noncommittal yesterday on the intended visit of US Assistant Secretary of State Richard Holbrooke to Cyprus, saying they "did not regard the attempts of friendly countries as pressure". Foreign Ministry Spokesman Omer Akbel said yesterday that Turkey had heard, from various channels, that Richard Holbrooke will take an interest in the Cyprus question in 1996. Akbel said that he expected Holbrooke to visit Cyprus, Turkey and Greece at the end of January but a date had not yet been finalized. The Turkish policy on Cyprus was that the two sides on the island would have the final say on a settlement that would be fair and lasting, Akbel said. "Within this framework, Turkey can only be happy with the contributions friendly countries will want to make to the problem" he added.

    Meanwhile, in order to support the economy of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC), Israel will use the land to which it has the deeds in Famagusta, once used for the returning of Jewish people after the ocupation of Palestine for new purposes. It is reported that Turkish Peace Forces in the TRNC, who are now using the land as a training camp, will in future utilize only one part of this land which belongs to Israel. An Israeli consortium will construct a 4,000-bed capacity hotel and restaurants on the remaining land. It is expected that investments on the island by Israel, which lobbied for Turkey's entry into the CU, will make important contributions to open the TRNC up to the outside world. /Cumhuriyet/

    [05] SWISS MODEL FOR CYPRUS

    As a result of firm pressure from the US and the uncompromising stand of Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) President Rauf Denktas, the Greek Cypriot community on the island seems to be taking a more reasonable view of equal sovereignty-along the lines of a "Swiss model."

    Leader of the Greek side, Glafkos Klerides, now says that he accepts all the different aspects of shared sovereignty in a federation based on the Swiss model. This has been interpreted as a step backwards as far as the Greek-Cypriot side is concerned and stems from the direction given by both Britain and the US in de- termined initiatives to find a solution to the problems on the island. /Cumhuriyet/

    [06] TURKEY SHOULD TRAIN BOSNIAN MILITARY

    The thought that the Turkish Armed Forces should take the lead in training the moslem Bosnian forces is gaining weight among foreign diplomats and US military leaders.

    Both US and UN experts agree that Turkish involvement in training Bosnian military units would be advantageous to stability in the region. However, diplomats and others are quick to point out that this idea is still "just thinking aloud." Nevertheless, most agree that the conditions for such a programme are very suitable. /Sabah/

    [07] FOUR PKK MILITANTS KILLED IN SOUTHEAST

    Four militants of the PKK terrorist organization were killed and two were captured during military operations in the Southeast. An official from the Diyarbakir-based emergency rule region said that two militants were killed in Sirnak's Kumcati district, one in the Batman district of Deriktepe and one in the Mardin district of Elmabahce. One militant was caught in Tunceli and another in the Hakkari region of Yuksekova. Three alleged PKK members surrendered in the Sirnak districts of Silopi and Beytussebap. /All papers/

    [08] AMNESTY CONDEMNS PKK

    Amnesty International (AI), in a press release, draws attention to abductions by the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) in the southeast of Turkey and condemned the PKK. AI said that Hakan Guler, a sports teacher aged 24, Kadri Tursun, a teacher, and Koksal Gumus, deputy director of the Lice regional education authority, were abducted from a minibus by armed members of the PKK on the evening of November 21, 1995. The press release emphasizes that their lives are in danger. AI said that during 1995 alone, armed PKK members killed over 70 civilians and prisoners. Most of the victims were Kurdish villagers who participated in the system of government- armed village guards, and their families, including women and children. /Sabah/

    [09] HABITAT BRIGHTENED WITH MUSIC

    Delegates attending the Habitat Conference, scheduled for June 3-14, 1996, will be able to attend also the 24th International Istanbul Music Festival that will be held on June 10- July 10, 1996. Thus, Istanbul will be promoted as a world cultural center. The Music Festival, organized every year between June 20 and July 18, has been planned especially to coincide with the Habitat Conference. This in itself represents a great opportunity for the promotion of Turkey abroad. Heads of state and government from more than 100 countries are expected to arrive in Istanbul for the last two days of the conference. /Sabah/

    [10] TURSAB TO ORGANIZE ABTA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

    The Turkish Travel Agencies Union (TURSAB) will organize a General Assembly of British Travel Agencies (ABTA) -the most important organizer of touristic activities in England- to be held in Istanbul between October 31 and November 5, 1996. ABTA Chairman Colin Trigger said that the main reason for choosing Istanbul was because it is an important world centre, and he added that about 2,500 delegates were expected to participate in the meeting. Trigger emphasized that TURSAB, which arranged the 29th World Congress of World Travel Agencies Union Federation (UFTAA) in 1995, will add to its success by organizing the ABTA General Assembly.

    [END]

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