Browse through our Interesting Nodes of Greek Local Authorities & Servers A)? GHT="50">
Compact version
Today's Suggestion
Read The "Macedonian Question" (by Maria Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou)
HomeAbout HR-NetNewsWeb SitesDocumentsOnline HelpUsage InformationContact us
Monday, 21 October 2019
 
News
  Latest News (All)
     From Greece
     From Cyprus
     From Europe
     From Balkans
     From Turkey
     From USA
  Announcements
  World Press
  News Archives
Web Sites
  Hosted
  Mirrored
  Interesting Nodes
Documents
  Special Topics
  Treaties, Conventions
  Constitutions
  U.S. Agencies
  Cyprus Problem
  Other
Services
  Personal NewsPaper
  Greek Fonts
  Tools
  F.A.Q.
 

TRKNWS-L Turkish Press Review (February 1, 1996)

From: TRKNWS-L <trh@aimnet.com>

Turkish Press Review Directory

CONTENTS

  • [01] ANKARA SEEKS ISLAND NEGOTIATIONS

  • [02] TURKEY BUYING JET ENGINES FROM US

  • [03] MORE COBRAS NEEDED FOR SOUTHEAST

  • [04] SEVEN SEPARATISTS KILLED

  • [05] TURKEY-AZERI VISA AGREEMENT RATIFIED

  • [06] AID FOR DINAR DISASTER VICTIMS CONTINUES

  • [07] HOPES OF IRAQI OIL SETTLEMENT

  • [08] TURKEY PRESSING AZERI PIPELINE ISSUE

  • [09] TURKISH CYPRIOTS IN LONDON

  • [10] JORDAN DEMANDS A REGIONAL WATER SUMMIT


  • TURKISH PRESS REVIEW

    THURSDAY FEBRUARY 1, 1996

    Summary of the political and economic news in the Turkish press this morning

    [01] ANKARA SEEKS ISLAND NEGOTIATIONS

    With a little persuasion from the US the military crisis between Turkey and Greece over two rocks in the Aegean Sea is over. Both sides withdrew troops and took away their flags in the early ay morning. What is left now is diplomatic negotiation to settle the matter of ownership of the Kardak rocks, and also the ownership of many more similar islets in the region.

    Diplomatic circles say that Greece has now to respond to the calls for dialogue made by Turkey. Turkish officials see the withdrawal as a climb down by the Greeks and as a victory for Turkey. President Clinton said yesterday that he was happy that the crisis was over, and that it had been resolved through dip- lomatic channels rather than resorting to military means.

    As the situation clarified, President Suleyman Demirel declared that he was glad commonsense had prevailed and he thanked all those concerned for acting with caution and sensitivity. Prime Minister Ciller noted too, that she had kept her promise to the nation in that Turkey had not lost "even a pebble" in the very volatile confrontation. Ciller also thanked everyone for staying cool at a time when issues were growing hotter by the minute.

    Once negotiations over the ownership of the islands have begun, the way will be open for other issues concerning the Aegean Sea to be taken up. Foreign Ministry spokesman Omer Akbel said yes- terday that so far no reply had been forthcoming from Athens about opening up talks. The news from Athens is that the gov- ernment there is in deep trouble, facing calls to resign and accusations that it was guilty of treason for compromising with Turkey.

    The Kardak island episode is only the latest incident in a long history of dispute between Turkey and Greece that covers everything from islands in the Aegean Sea to issues involving the Kurds, ethnic rights, mineral rights, airspace and Cyprus. Turkey would like to see more dialogue to resolve the issues within a diplomatic framework, but Greece continues to hold back. /All papers/

    [02] TURKEY BUYING JET ENGINES FROM US

    Turkey has ordered six General Electric engines for its F-16D trainer planes. Deliovery is expected to be completed by June 1997, and will be counted as part of the US-Turkey "foreign military sales program." According to some sources, the Turkish Air Force is presently using 24 of the advanced F-16D training planes in nine fighter squadrons. /All papers/

    [03] MORE COBRAS NEEDED FOR SOUTHEAST

    Turkish officials said yesterday that the US government will likely take up in Congress the question of Turkey's demands for more Super Cobra helicopters for use in the southeast of the country against separatist outbreaks. Turkey is already using ten of the helicopters against the mountain strongholds of terrorist groups that continue to wage war against Turkish security forces.

    Turkey has been negotiating to buy the helicopters since the spring of 1995, and the purchase is part of government programs to beef-up domestic security forces and secure the southeastern regions of the country against separatist attacks. /All papers/

    [04] SEVEN SEPARATISTS KILLED

    During military security operations in the region around the town of Sivas, seven members of the illegal Revolutionary People's Liberation Party Front (DHKP-C) were killed, says the Anatolia news agency. One of those killed has been identified as a man on the run from the police. A military spokesman yesterday told the Anatolia news agency that operations were continuing.

    [05] TURKEY-AZERI VISA AGREEMENT RATIFIED

    A long debated visa exemption agreement between Turkey and Azer- baijan has at last been ratified by the Turkish Cabinet in Ankara, the Anatolia news agency reported yesterday. The agreement aims to simplify travel between the two countries, and has done away with visa requirements for people with diplomatic, special and service passports for visits of up to three months duration. /All papers/

    [06] AID FOR DINAR DISASTER VICTIMS CONTINUES

    The government run Directorate for Disaster Relief has already spent 1.5 trillion TL on aid for the victims of the Dinar earth- quake which happened four months ago. Billions of TL have been spent on food, tents and clothing. Even more has been spent on initial clearing up work and repairs. Officials yesterday told the Anatolia news agency that by the end of this year thirty trillion TL will have been paid out in compensation and new infrastructural projects. /All papers/

    [07] HOPES OF IRAQI OIL SETTLEMENT

    Turkey hopes that talks between UN officials and the Iraqi government that will begin next week will lead to allowing Iraq to sell oil worth two billion dollars over a six month period. This means that the now defunct oil pipeline between Kirkuk in northern Iraq and the Yumurtalik facilities near Adana on the Mediterranean coast would once again come into operation-and add to Turkey's earnings.

    Representatives of Turkey's Pipeline Authority (BOTAS), said that Turkey once earned one million dollars a day from pipeline fees. These were lost when after the gulf war, the UN imposed economic sanctions on Iraq more than five years ago. /All papers/

    [08] TURKEY PRESSING AZERI PIPELINE ISSUE

    A special team of Turkish oil and pipeline experts has arrived in Washington to have talks about proposed pipeline projects to bring early Azeri oil to world markets.

    Turkey has a big interest in these plans because Turkey has long been negotiating a pipeline route through Turkey. The special team will hold meetings with oil industry representatives, World bank executives and US government officials. Reports from Washington indicate that Turkey's proposals for a pipeline route and financing are meeting with approval, even though the US especially is still inclined towards a multiple pipeline system. /All papers/

    [09] TURKISH CYPRIOTS IN LONDON

    A group of Turkish Cypriots from the "Forum of Turkish Cypriots for European Union", arrived yesterday in Brussels for contacts with European Parliament (EP) and the European Commission (EC) officials. The delegation, consisting of representatives of Turkish Cypriot associations in London, is headed by Ilker Kilic, Chairman of the London Solidarity Association of the Republican Turkish Party. At a press conference, Ilker Kilic said that they wanted to create an opportunity for EP and EC officials to observe the situation for themselves by inviting them to Northern Cyprus. "Our goal is to ensure the admission of Northern Cyprus into the EU together with Southern Cyprus", group officials noted and added that they hoped that this goal would be realized by the year 2003. They stressed that EU membership would be possible only after a solution to the Cypriot problem was found.

    The delegation had talks with EP Socialist Group Chairman Pauline Green, EP reporter for Cyprus Jan Willem Bertens and EP-Cyprus Joint Parliamentary Commission Chairman Mechthilde Rothe. /Cumhuriyet/

    [10] JORDAN DEMANDS A REGIONAL WATER SUMMIT

    Prince Hasan Bin Tallal, in Turkey yesterday for a one day working visit, participated in a meeting with President Demirel during his short visit. The main topic was the regional problem related to limited water resources, causing a dispute between Turkey and Syria, the solution of which is also important to the peace process in the Middle East. Within this framework Prince dwelt on the importance of cooperation and asked for Turkey's support for a "regional summit" concerning the water issue. Princer noted the importance of Turkey in the region concerning water resources. According to the reports Demirel gave neither a positive nor a negative answer to his request. However Demirel did state that Turkey rejected claims that the water problem in the Middle East was related to the rivers; Euphrates anr Tigris which flow outwards from Turkey.

    Foreign Minister Deniz Baykal also agreed that Turkey and Jordan could cooparate in the solution of regional, economic and social issues and in the peace process.

    Other topics discussed were related to Iraq and the Peace Process in Middle East. /Cumhuriyet, Milliyet/

    Back to Top
    Copyright 1995-2016 HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network). An HRI Project.
    All Rights Reserved.

    HTML by the HR-Net Group / Hellenic Resources Institute
    news2html v2.20 run on Friday, 2 February 1996 - 15:54:06