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Voice of America, 99-10-03

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] YUGO / OPPOSITION / L BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)
  • [02] SERBIAN ACCIDENT (L-ONLY) BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)
  • [03] YUGO OPPOSITION (L-UPDATE) BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)

  • [01] YUGO / OPPOSITION / L BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)

    DATE=10/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254586
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Despite legal threats from the Yugoslav government, Serbian activists say they will continue their street protests against President Slobodan Milosevic. A key opposition leader tells V-O-A that he does not want dialogue with Mr. Milosevic, only his downfall. Philip Smucker reports from Belgrade.

    TEXT: Opposition leaders say they are going ahead with further protests against the Yugoslav President even though the government is bringing new pressure on them to back off. Demonstrators say they will try to march to Belgrade's main hospital Saturday night to visit fellow marchers injured in earlier clashes with the police. The government says it has already begun an investigation to identify what it calls the "leaders of the violence." Officials have accused protesters of provoking attacks against police. Democratic Party leader Zoran Djindjic says he cannot tell his people to remain peaceful in the face of what he describes as police brutality. He says tear gas and batons cannot stop the movement towards democracy. On Friday, police sealed off part of the capital to prevent an announced protest march toward President Milosevic's home. Opposition leaders marched instead to another part of the city with a much smaller crowd than they had brought out the two previous nights. Another opposition leader, Cedomir Jovanovic, told V- O-A that he was not interested in negotiating with Mr. Milosevic.

    /// JOVANOVIC ACT ///

    I don't want to talk to Milosevic. I don't want dialogue with Milosevic. I just want to bring down Milosevic.

    /// END ACT //

    Mr. Jovanovic was chased into his party headquarters this week after being accosted and beaten on the street. He claims his assailants were 10 plain-clothed policemen. In another development the government has banned a daily newspaper, Glas Javnosti, apparently to punish it for publishing a small paper handed out to protesters at the rallies. (signed)
    NEB/PS/DW/JO 02-Oct-1999 09:17 AM EDT (02-Oct-1999 1317 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] SERBIAN ACCIDENT (L-ONLY) BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)

    DATE=10/3/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254610
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A top Serbian opposition leader, who was the only survivor in an auto accident Sunday that killed four others, has said from his hospital bed that the accident was in fact an assassination attempt. The incident has cast a shadow over the anti-government protests, which have grown in strength over the last 12 days. Philip Smucker reports from Belgrade.

    TEXT: Vuk Draskovic, a fiery opposition leader, is the only survivor of an automobile accident that killed three body guards and wife's brother. The accident took place near the town of Lazarevic in central Serbia as they were on an excursion to visit the historical site of Ravna Gora, where Serbian resistance fighters mustered their army in World War Two. Mr. Draskovic received only minor injuries. He expressed bitterness and anger, and said that truck driver who collided with two cars in his convoy was trying to kill him. He did not indicate, however, who the driver might have been working for or why he would have wanted to kill him. Mr. Draskovic also claimed that the truck driver has mysteriously disappeared. Serbian police officials, who investigated the crash site, were not immediately available for comment. Protesters at an anti-government rally held a minute of silence Sunday for Mr. Draskovic and the dead members of his entourage. Serbian police did not beat the demonstrators as they did twice in recent days. The charismatic street politician had been considering participation in the anti-government protests before his accident. The 52-year-old politician served in the Milosevic-led government earlier this year, but was fired in April because of policy disagreements during the 11-week NATO air war against Yugoslavia. NEB/ps/gm 03-Oct-1999 17:16 PM EDT (03-Oct-1999 2116 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [03] YUGO OPPOSITION (L-UPDATE) BY PHILIP SMUCKER (BELGRADE)

    DATE=10/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-254592
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    /// Eds: Updates CR 2-254586; new throughout ///

    INTRO: Riot police in Yugoslavia have blocked a protest march in the capital by about 15-thousand anti-government demonstrators -- one of several opposition rallies staged throughout the country Saturday. The marchers in Belgrade were trying to reach a hospital where 20 people injured during the past week of violent street protests are being treated. Philip Smucker reports.

    TEXT:

    /// SFX OF DEMONSTRATORS WHISTLING ///

    Special police units successfully cordoned off streets leading to Belgrade's main hospital Saturday night. Demonstrators trying to pay their respects to persons injured by the police earlier in the week were halted in their tracks. Police wielding rubber truncheons formed a cordon that prevented the protesters from reaching the hospital. The opposition had planned the march to honor around 20 people injured in clashes with police during rallies Wednesday and Thursday. The riot police stopped the demonstrators by forming a line in front of them, and advancing. The protesters backed off quickly -- sometimes running for safety -- in an effort to avoid the severe beatings that others received earlier in the week. Opposition leaders with the Alliance for Change praised the marchers for avoiding confrontation with the Serbian police. The Alliance is demanding the ouster of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Some demonstrators carried placards with a picture of 19-year-old Djordje Lazarevic, who was seriously injured when police forcibly dispersed demonstrators Wednesday. The placards said the head and brain injuries were the work of the President's police force. Meanwhile, a senior U-N human rights official condemned what he described as "police brutality" against the protesters Jiri Dienstbier said the beatings of unarmed civilians were a violation of human rights. Elsewhere in Serbia, around 25-thousand people attended a rally in the southern town of Nis, and more than 10-thousand demonstrated in the northern town of Novi Sad. After Wednesday's clashes, police branded opposition supporters as hooligans. They have accused them of preparing attacks on the police with bricks and stones. A state prosecutor has threatened to investigate and raise charges against persons the government says are leading the violence. (Signed)
    NEB/PS/WTW 02-Oct-1999 20:17 PM EDT (03-Oct-1999 0017 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America
    Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article
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