Browse through our Interesting Nodes on Russia A)? GHT="50">
Compact version
Today's Suggestion
Read The "Macedonian Question" (by Maria Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou)
HomeAbout HR-NetNewsWeb SitesDocumentsOnline HelpUsage InformationContact us
Sunday, 28 February 2021
 
News
  Latest News (All)
     From Greece
     From Cyprus
     From Europe
     From Balkans
     From Turkey
     From USA
  Announcements
  World Press
  News Archives
Web Sites
  Hosted
  Mirrored
  Interesting Nodes
Documents
  Special Topics
  Treaties, Conventions
  Constitutions
  U.S. Agencies
  Cyprus Problem
  Other
Services
  Personal NewsPaper
  Greek Fonts
  Tools
  F.A.Q.
 

Voice of America, 99-12-27

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] EUROPE WEATHER (L-ONLY) BY PAUL MILLER (PARIS)
  • [02] EUROPE WEATHER (L-ONLY) BY PAUL MILLER (PARIS)
  • [03] N-Y ECON WRAP (S&L) BY BRECK ARDERY (NEW YORK)

  • [01] EUROPE WEATHER (L-ONLY) BY PAUL MILLER (PARIS)

    DATE=12/27/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-257451
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Western Europe is cleaning up after a fierce winter storm that killed at least 60-people. One of the hardest hit countries is France. Paul Miller reports from Paris that widespread power failures, flooding, and damage have repair crews and firefighters working around the clock.

    TEXT: People died in France when the roofs of homes collapsed; others died when trees fell on their cars. One woman was blown into the water at Le Havre and drowned. A million and a half people lost electric power - most of them spent a night without heat as well. The winds were clocked at 200-kilometers an hour on the coast, and a record 170-kilometers at Orly Airport outside Paris. An estimated one-million trees were brought down in the Ile de France area - including large parts of the Bois de Boulogne on the edge of Paris and the gardens at Versailles. In the eastern part of the country, main power lines were destroyed. In the west, especially in Normandy, several villages were inundated by floodwaters. Throughout the northern half of the country, there was widespread damage from wind and falling debris. In Paris, firefighters dealt with thousands of calls - many of them to remove toppled chimneys and other debris before they fell to the ground. Weather forecasters said it was the strongest recorded storm to hit France. In Germany, forecasters said much the same thing about the high winds. Falling branches caused most of the deaths in Germany. In Switzerland two people were killed when a falling tree brought down a cable car. Winds tore buildings apart and flattened forests. Railroads and highways were blocked throughout the three countries. Repair crews say it will take at least 10-days to restore power and clear fallen trees. (SIGNED)
    NEB/PM/GE/RAE 27-Dec-1999 10:58 AM EDT (27-Dec-1999 1558 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [02] EUROPE WEATHER (L-ONLY) BY PAUL MILLER (PARIS)

    DATE=12/27/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-257451
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Western Europe is cleaning up after a fierce winter storm that killed at least 60-people. One of the hardest hit countries is France. Paul Miller reports from Paris that widespread power failures, flooding, and damage have repair crews and firefighters working around the clock.

    TEXT: People died in France when the roofs of homes collapsed; others died when trees fell on their cars. One woman was blown into the water at Le Havre and drowned. A million and a half people lost electric power - most of them spent a night without heat as well. The winds were clocked at 200-kilometers an hour on the coast, and a record 170-kilometers at Orly Airport outside Paris. An estimated one-million trees were brought down in the Ile de France area - including large parts of the Bois de Boulogne on the edge of Paris and the gardens at Versailles. In the eastern part of the country, main power lines were destroyed. In the west, especially in Normandy, several villages were inundated by floodwaters. Throughout the northern half of the country, there was widespread damage from wind and falling debris. In Paris, firefighters dealt with thousands of calls - many of them to remove toppled chimneys and other debris before they fell to the ground. Weather forecasters said it was the strongest recorded storm to hit France. In Germany, forecasters said much the same thing about the high winds. Falling branches caused most of the deaths in Germany. In Switzerland two people were killed when a falling tree brought down a cable car. Winds tore buildings apart and flattened forests. Railroads and highways were blocked throughout the three countries. Repair crews say it will take at least 10-days to restore power and clear fallen trees. (SIGNED)
    NEB/PM/GE/RAE 27-Dec-1999 10:58 AM EDT (27-Dec-1999 1558 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [03] N-Y ECON WRAP (S&L) BY BRECK ARDERY (NEW YORK)

    DATE=12/27/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-257546
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Stock prices in the United States were mixed Monday, but the NASDAQ index closed at a record high in a late-session rally. V-O-A Correspondent Breck Ardery reports from New York.

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed at 11- thousand-391, down 14 points. The Standard and Poor's 500 index closed at 14-hundred-57, down one point. The NASDAQ index was up almost six points to a record high three-thousand-975. The NASDAQ index had been down for most of the day, but late-session buying of technology stocks lifted the index to a record. But Richard McCabe of the Merrill Lynch investment company says stocks which have recently been strong may begin to lose some of their luster as the year comes to a close.

    /// McCABE ACT ///

    Some people who do not have adverse tax consequences may say, "perhaps I will take some of my profits now to beat the rush next week." I think the weak stocks will rally and the strong stocks will likely come under some profit-taking.

    /// END ACT ///

    Initial reports show American retailers had a very merry Christmas shopping season. Analysts estimate that holiday sales jumped by almost eight percent, with a big increase in business for on-line retailers.

    /// REST OPT ///

    The stock of Prison Realty, the largest private prison company in the United States, lost almost 20 percent. The financially-troubled company will restructure and change top management. The Dexter Corporation, a specialty materials supplier, has rejected a takeover offer worth almost one-billion dollars from I-S-P, a chemicals firm. Dexter says the bid is financially inadequate, and not in the best interest of its shareholders. A-T-and-T, the largest telecommunications company in the United States, has begun a legal challenge to Bell Atlantic's plans to offer long-distance telephone service. Bell Atlantic would be the first American regional telephone company to provide long-distance service, in competition with A-T-and-T, M-C-I Worldcom and several other long-distance carriers. Blackstone, a New York investment bank, will pay 200- million dollars for a 10-percent interest in Sirius Radio, a company that is not yet in business. Sirius is building a commercial-free satellite radio system that will be available by subscription. (Signed) NEB/NY/BA/LSF/WTW 27-Dec-1999 17:26 PM EDT (27-Dec-1999 2226 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America
    Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article
    Back to Top
    Copyright © 1995-2016 HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network). An HRI Project.
    All Rights Reserved.

    HTML by the HR-Net Group / Hellenic Resources Institute, Inc.
    voa2html v2.03a run on Tuesday, 28 December 1999 - 9:58:33 UTC