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Voice of America, 02-03-27

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>

SLUG: 0-09787 Editorial - The Long Struggle DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

CONTENTS

  • [01] EDITORIAL: THE LONG STRUGGLE
  • [02] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)
  • [03] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)
  • [04] EDITORIAL: BUSH ON WORLD POVERTY

  • [01] EDITORIAL: THE LONG STRUGGLE

    DATE=03/27/2002
    TYPE=EDITORIAL
    NUMBER=0-09787
    INTERNET=Yes CONTENT=THIS EDITORIAL IS BEING RELEASED FOR USE BY ALL SERVICES.
    Anncr: Next, an editorial expressing the policies of the United States Government: Voice: Suicide bombings in Israel. A car bombing in Peru. Shootings in Spain and Italy. Grenades tossed into a Protestant church in Pakistan during a worship service. Many innocents are being killed by acts of terrorism like these. "This is a dangerous world," said President George W. Bush. "Too many people are losing their lives to murderers." The U.S. will not let terrorists intimidate freedom-loving societies. The Taleban in Afghanistan know exactly what President Bush meant. The U.S.-led coalition helped to remove them from power. The U.S. does not seek revenge. The U.S. seeks justice. That's what's happening in Afghanistan now where the remaining Taleban and al-Qaida terrorists are being hunted down and made to pay for their evil deeds. As President Bush said, "America will fight terror wherever we find it and...we will call upon leaders around the world to do so, as well. Mr. Arafat must do more to stop violence in the Middle East. And...I will remind leaders of their obligation to defend innocent people; of their obligation to make sure they uphold this doctrine: If you harbor a terrorist, if you hide a terrorist, if you feed a terrorist, you're just as guilty as the terrorists themselves." The war against terrorism will take time. Patience and unity are needed. It's tough fighting a foe willing to send young people to their suicidal deaths. The terrorist leaders may try to find a cave to hide in. But there's no cave deep enough. They are finding that out now. President Bush said, "It doesn't matter how long it takes. We're going to hunt them down one by one and bring them to justice." When terrorism is defeated, he said, "the world will be more peaceful." And as Mr. Bush put it, "We'll have a chance to solve some problems around the world that some people had given up hope on." Anncr: That was an editorial expressing the policies of the United States Government. If you have a comment, please write to Editorials, V-O-A, Washington, D-C, 20237, U-S-A. You may also comment at www-dot-ibb-dot-gov-slash-editorials, or fax us at (202) 619-1043. SLUG: 6-125620 Editorial Digest DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

    [02] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=03/27/02
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-125620
    INTERNET=YES EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: The debate over whether Palestinian Chairman Yasser Arafat would be allowed to attend today's Arab Summit in neighboring Lebanon is drawing the attention of many editorial writers this Wednesday. President Bush's trip to Mexico and his plan to expand U-S foreign aid is another popular topic. Afghanistan's difficult post-war recovery effort gets some attention; as does former President Jimmy Carter's trip to Cuba. Other editorials deal with relations on the Korean peninsula and the Roman Catholic sex scandal here in the United States. Now, here is ______________ with a closer look and some quotes in today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: Late Tuesday, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat said he would not attend the Arab League summit, which begins today in Beirut, because of the possibility that Israel would not let him return home. In New York City, The Daily News says he "won't be missed." Adding:

    VOICE: In the end, it wasn't Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon who prevented Yasser Arafat from attending the Arab League summit It was [the] P-L-O leader himself and his refusal to commit to peace. Shades of Camp David two-thousand, when Israel was ready to make peace and [Chairman] Arafat's response was to sue for war. Exactly what would someone who takes pride in atrocities bring to the table, anyway?

    TEXT: This Chicago Sun Times headline sums up that paper's view: "[Mr.] Arafat's inaction cost him [the] summit." In Wisconsin, however, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is still hopeful some good can come from the meeting, as the Saudi peace plan is discussed.

    VOICE: With or without Yasser Arafat, in Beirut today, the Palestinians have a precious opportunity to undo some of the damage that was inflicted on their cause nearly two years ago when [Mr.] Arafat rejected a historic peace plan. The opportunity comes when the 22-member Arab League convenes in Beirut. The meeting became important weeks ago when Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia said he would make an unprecedented proposal [there] that the Arab world agree to normalize its relations with Israel in return for an Israeli withdrawal from all the land it occupied in the 1967 Arab-Israeli war.

    TEXT: Out in the Pacific, however Hawaii's Honolulu Advertiser is discouraged, noting several key absences, of Mr. Arafat, Jordan's king, and President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt. Its feelings are summed up in this editorial headline: "Arab summit loses a chance for progress" and it adds sadly that, "the Saudi proposal deserves more serious consideration that it now appears likely to get." In Texas, The San Antonio Express-News says with 10 Arab leaders absent, there are: "Too many missing from [the] Arab summit." Still in the region, today's Boston Globe is expressing worry about newly disclosed hints of cooperation between Iran's hard-line clerical rulers and Yasser Arafat. President George Bush's turn around on foreign aid, announced at last week's Economic Development summit in Mexico, continues to draw reaction. The Detroit Free Press points out:

    VOICE: Seven decades of U-S foreign aid to developing nations has had mixed results at best. Domestic dollars helped fight disease, poverty and poor living conditions around the world Yet, in far too many countries, aid only bolstered corrupt and undemocratic regimes. Given that history, President Bush struck the right balance when he announced a 5-billion-dollar increase in foreign aid - - with strings.

    TEXT: The Free Press is pleased the president wants much more accountability from the recipient nations. Today's Dallas Morning News wants the president to follow up his promises made on the trip about bolstering free trade within the Western Hemisphere.

    VOICE: one of the best ways to reduce poverty - - open markets - - became a focus of discussions only later - - when Mr. Bush met with Latin American leaders in Peru and El Salvador. Struggling Latin democracies need free trade even more than they need money to develop alternatives to illicit drugs.

    TEXT: Today's Winston-Salem Journal in North Carolina is upset at the way the U-S spends its foreign aid, and at the miserly amount given. Quoting London's Economics magazine it complains:

    VOICE: the United States spends a smaller percentage of its national income on foreign aid than any wealthy country in the world. And it tends to spend a higher percentage in middle-income countries such as Colombia and Egypt, for reasons unrelated to poverty and its reduction.

    TEXT: Moving to post-conflict Afghanistan, and the country's future, The New York Times leads today's column with this critical assessment.

    VOICE: The Bush administration devised a successful strategy for winning the war in Afghanistan. An equally effective plan for securing the peace is now urgently needed. Unfortunately, no coherent policy is yet in sight. Even the capital Kabul is not yet safe enough for Afghanistan's king to return from exile. Elsewhere, rival warlords clash, bandits prey and opportunistic neighbors like Iran maneuver for influence. The best solution would be to expand the international force [to] a total of 25-thousand to 30-thousand troops.

    TEXT: Today's Los Angeles Times is also somewhat critical of the U-S role in the rebuilding effort, urging Washington to send special forces teams into the deep countryside to fulfill promises of aid made by their colleagues during the anti-Taleban fighting. And Louisiana's Times-Picayune is highly critical of the prepared meals dropped from U-S aircraft to help feed the Afghans, most of which spoiled, says the paper, because it was not supposed to be dropped from planes. In this hemisphere, a planned visit to Cuba by former president Jimmy Carter is drawing some response from a few papers. The Houston Chronicle, noting that no agenda has yet been set for the trip, suggests one.

    VOICE: [President] Carter could ask to meet with human rights activists who struggle with the Castro regime. Of course, he could find many of them conveniently convened for his arrival - - in Cuban prisons. Perhaps he could inquire of the tens of thousands of Cubans murdered by [Mr.] Castro's infamous firing squads, the more than half a million who suffered for their beliefs in Cuban political dungeons, and the untold numbers who have died to cross the Florida Straits in pursuit of freedoms that Mr. Carter's host denies.

    TEXT: The New York Post says of the proposed trip, base on previous Carter travels, that the former president "truckles to one tyrannical regime or bloody-handed old dictator after another while speaking ill of American foreign policy. [His] visit to Havana will serve only to give [President] Castro more of the legitimacy he craves. In Asian affairs, The Los Angeles Times calls an "encouraging development" news that North and South Korean say they "will resume official contacts next month" restarting high-level "talks about reconciliation." In New Hampshire, Manchester's Union Leader talks about the increasing flow of North Korean refugees crossing the border into China "to escape oppression and famine" Domestically, outrage and disgust continues to color comments on the expanding Roman Catholic priest sex scandal enveloping this country. Among the outraged is today's Des Moines [Iowa] Register, which points out:

    VOICE: it's nothing new. It's estimated since 1985, the [Catholic] church had quietly paid out about one billion dollars settling abuse cases. But in January, when the Boston Globe uncovered documents that demonstrated the lengths church officials there went to in protecting and even accommodating a priest who abused children, the scandal mushroomed. It's estimated there could be as many as two-thousand priests across the country accused of abuse.

    TEXT: The Register is disappointed, as it says Pope John Paul The Second has so far not offered "any direction on how to proceed." And that concludes this editorial sampling of Wednesday's U-S press.
    NEB/ANG/KPD


    [03] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=03/27/02
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-125620
    INTERNET=YES EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: The debate over whether Palestinian Chairman Yasser Arafat would be allowed to attend today's Arab Summit in neighboring Lebanon is drawing the attention of many editorial writers this Wednesday. President Bush's trip to Mexico and his plan to expand U-S foreign aid is another popular topic. Afghanistan's difficult post-war recovery effort gets some attention; as does former President Jimmy Carter's trip to Cuba. Other editorials deal with relations on the Korean peninsula and the Roman Catholic sex scandal here in the United States. Now, here is ______________ with a closer look and some quotes in today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: Late Tuesday, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat said he would not attend the Arab League summit, which begins today in Beirut, because of the possibility that Israel would not let him return home. In New York City, The Daily News says he "won't be missed." Adding:

    VOICE: In the end, it wasn't Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon who prevented Yasser Arafat from attending the Arab League summit It was [the] P-L-O leader himself and his refusal to commit to peace. Shades of Camp David two-thousand, when Israel was ready to make peace and [Chairman] Arafat's response was to sue for war. Exactly what would someone who takes pride in atrocities bring to the table, anyway?

    TEXT: This Chicago Sun Times headline sums up that paper's view: "[Mr.] Arafat's inaction cost him [the] summit." In Wisconsin, however, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is still hopeful some good can come from the meeting, as the Saudi peace plan is discussed.

    VOICE: With or without Yasser Arafat, in Beirut today, the Palestinians have a precious opportunity to undo some of the damage that was inflicted on their cause nearly two years ago when [Mr.] Arafat rejected a historic peace plan. The opportunity comes when the 22-member Arab League convenes in Beirut. The meeting became important weeks ago when Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia said he would make an unprecedented proposal [there] that the Arab world agree to normalize its relations with Israel in return for an Israeli withdrawal from all the land it occupied in the 1967 Arab-Israeli war.

    TEXT: Out in the Pacific, however Hawaii's Honolulu Advertiser is discouraged, noting several key absences, of Mr. Arafat, Jordan's king, and President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt. Its feelings are summed up in this editorial headline: "Arab summit loses a chance for progress" and it adds sadly that, "the Saudi proposal deserves more serious consideration that it now appears likely to get." In Texas, The San Antonio Express-News says with 10 Arab leaders absent, there are: "Too many missing from [the] Arab summit." Still in the region, today's Boston Globe is expressing worry about newly disclosed hints of cooperation between Iran's hard-line clerical rulers and Yasser Arafat. President George Bush's turn around on foreign aid, announced at last week's Economic Development summit in Mexico, continues to draw reaction. The Detroit Free Press points out:

    VOICE: Seven decades of U-S foreign aid to developing nations has had mixed results at best. Domestic dollars helped fight disease, poverty and poor living conditions around the world Yet, in far too many countries, aid only bolstered corrupt and undemocratic regimes. Given that history, President Bush struck the right balance when he announced a 5-billion-dollar increase in foreign aid - - with strings.

    TEXT: The Free Press is pleased the president wants much more accountability from the recipient nations. Today's Dallas Morning News wants the president to follow up his promises made on the trip about bolstering free trade within the Western Hemisphere.

    VOICE: one of the best ways to reduce poverty - - open markets - - became a focus of discussions only later - - when Mr. Bush met with Latin American leaders in Peru and El Salvador. Struggling Latin democracies need free trade even more than they need money to develop alternatives to illicit drugs.

    TEXT: Today's Winston-Salem Journal in North Carolina is upset at the way the U-S spends its foreign aid, and at the miserly amount given. Quoting London's Economics magazine it complains:

    VOICE: the United States spends a smaller percentage of its national income on foreign aid than any wealthy country in the world. And it tends to spend a higher percentage in middle-income countries such as Colombia and Egypt, for reasons unrelated to poverty and its reduction.

    TEXT: Moving to post-conflict Afghanistan, and the country's future, The New York Times leads today's column with this critical assessment.

    VOICE: The Bush administration devised a successful strategy for winning the war in Afghanistan. An equally effective plan for securing the peace is now urgently needed. Unfortunately, no coherent policy is yet in sight. Even the capital Kabul is not yet safe enough for Afghanistan's king to return from exile. Elsewhere, rival warlords clash, bandits prey and opportunistic neighbors like Iran maneuver for influence. The best solution would be to expand the international force [to] a total of 25-thousand to 30-thousand troops.

    TEXT: Today's Los Angeles Times is also somewhat critical of the U-S role in the rebuilding effort, urging Washington to send special forces teams into the deep countryside to fulfill promises of aid made by their colleagues during the anti-Taleban fighting. And Louisiana's Times-Picayune is highly critical of the prepared meals dropped from U-S aircraft to help feed the Afghans, most of which spoiled, says the paper, because it was not supposed to be dropped from planes. In this hemisphere, a planned visit to Cuba by former president Jimmy Carter is drawing some response from a few papers. The Houston Chronicle, noting that no agenda has yet been set for the trip, suggests one.

    VOICE: [President] Carter could ask to meet with human rights activists who struggle with the Castro regime. Of course, he could find many of them conveniently convened for his arrival - - in Cuban prisons. Perhaps he could inquire of the tens of thousands of Cubans murdered by [Mr.] Castro's infamous firing squads, the more than half a million who suffered for their beliefs in Cuban political dungeons, and the untold numbers who have died to cross the Florida Straits in pursuit of freedoms that Mr. Carter's host denies.

    TEXT: The New York Post says of the proposed trip, base on previous Carter travels, that the former president "truckles to one tyrannical regime or bloody-handed old dictator after another while speaking ill of American foreign policy. [His] visit to Havana will serve only to give [President] Castro more of the legitimacy he craves. In Asian affairs, The Los Angeles Times calls an "encouraging development" news that North and South Korean say they "will resume official contacts next month" restarting high-level "talks about reconciliation." In New Hampshire, Manchester's Union Leader talks about the increasing flow of North Korean refugees crossing the border into China "to escape oppression and famine" Domestically, outrage and disgust continues to color comments on the expanding Roman Catholic priest sex scandal enveloping this country. Among the outraged is today's Des Moines [Iowa] Register, which points out:

    VOICE: it's nothing new. It's estimated since 1985, the [Catholic] church had quietly paid out about one billion dollars settling abuse cases. But in January, when the Boston Globe uncovered documents that demonstrated the lengths church officials there went to in protecting and even accommodating a priest who abused children, the scandal mushroomed. It's estimated there could be as many as two-thousand priests across the country accused of abuse.

    TEXT: The Register is disappointed, as it says Pope John Paul The Second has so far not offered "any direction on how to proceed." And that concludes this editorial sampling of Wednesday's U-S press.
    NEB/ANG/KPD SLUG: 0-09786 Editorial - Bush on World Poverty DATE: NOTE NUMBER:


    [04] EDITORIAL: BUSH ON WORLD POVERTY

    DATE=03/27/2002
    TYPE=EDITORIAL
    NUMBER=0-09786
    INTERNET=Yes CONTENT=THIS EDITORIAL IS BEING RELEASED FOR USE BY ALL SERVICES.
    Anncr: Next, an editorial expressing the policies of the United States Government: Voice: The United States is the world's leading contributor of humanitarian assistance. The U.S., said President George W. Bush, fights "against poverty because faith requires it and conscience demands it." Economic opportunity is fundamental to human dignity. Unfortunately, for decades, the success of development aid was measured only by the resources spent, not in the results achieved. That must change. As President Bush put it, "Pouring money into a failed status quo does little to help the poor, and can actually delay the progress of reform." Developed nations have a duty not only to share wealth, but also to encourage conditions that enable people to produce it -- economic freedom, political liberty, the rule of law, and respect for human rights. When countries respect their citizens, open their markets, and invest in better health and education, every dollar of aid, like every dollar of trade revenue or domestic capital, is used more effectively. When nations adopt reforms, a dollar of aid can attract two dollars of private investment. But aid is not the main factor in economic success. The vast majority of financing for development comes not from aid, but from trade and capital. All told, developing countries receive approximately fifty-billion dollars every year in aid, but almost two-hundred billion in foreign investment. As President Bush said, "To be serious about fighting poverty, we must be serious about expanding trade." Greater access to the markets of wealthy countries has "an immediate impact on the economies of developing nations. Trade has helped nations as diverse as South Korea, Chile, and China to expand opportunity. Trade brings new technology and new ideas. The U-S is committed to linking foreign aid to political, legal, and economic reform. That's why President Bush intends to establish what he calls the Millennium Challenge Account. It will be used to fund projects in nations that govern justly, invest in their people, and encourage economic freedom. "We will," said President Bush, "promote development from the bottom up, helping citizens find the tools and training and technologies to seize the opportunities of the global economy." Anncr: That was an editorial expressing the policies of the United States Government. If you have a comment, please write to Editorials, V-O-A, Washington, D-C, 20237, U-S-A. You may also comment at www-dot-ibb-dot-gov-slash-editorials, or fax us at (202) 619-1043.
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