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OMRI Daily Digest II, No. 234, 4 December 1995

From: "Steve Iatrou" <siatrou@cdsp.neu.edu>

Open Media Research Institute Directory

CONTENTS

  • [1] GENERAL MLADIC REJECTS DAYTON AGREEMENT . . .

  • [2] . . . BUT CLINTON EXPECTS MILOSEVIC TO BRING HIM INTO LINE.

  • [3] NATO AGREES TO SEND FORCES TO BOSNIA.

  • [4] POLITICAL SHOWDOWN IN ZAGREB.

  • [5] SERBIAN OPPOSITION PARTY PURGES RANKS.

  • [6] HUNGARIAN OFFICIAL ON ROMANIAN-HUNGARIAN RELATIONS.

  • [7] YELTSIN RESPONDS TO MOLDOVAN PRESIDENT'S LETTER.

  • [8] BULGARIAN PARLIAMENT BACKS GOVERNMENT BID FOR EU MEMBERSHIP.

  • [9] BULGARIA PROTESTS ROMANIAN SEIZURE OF NUCLEAR FUEL.

  • [10] INVESTIGATION LAUNCHED INTO HEAD OF BALLI KOMBETAR.


  • OMRI DAILY DIGEST

    No. 234, Part II, 4 December 1995

    SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [1] GENERAL MLADIC REJECTS DAYTON AGREEMENT . . .

    International media on 3 December reported that the Bosnian Serb military commander the previous day made his first public statements on the peace treaty. He said it was unacceptable because "some territories in which Serbs have lived for centuries have been handed over to the Croat-Muslim coalition.'' CNN showed the internationally wanted war criminal reviewing smartly dressed and well-disciplined troops whom he told that "we cannot allow our people to come under the rule of butchers." The network also interviewed U.S. Chief of Staff General John Shalikashvili, who said that NATO troops would not conduct a house-to-house search for Mladic and other Bosnian Serb war criminals but would hand them over "to the civilian authorities" if caught. -- Patrick Moore

    [2] . . . BUT CLINTON EXPECTS MILOSEVIC TO BRING HIM INTO LINE.

    In apparent response to Mladic's implicit threats, President Bill Clinton on 3 December said that "we fully expect that [Serbian] President [Slobodan] Milosevic will take the appropriate steps to ensure that the treaty will be honored as it is written, and that we will not have undue interference with implementing it," the International Herald Tribune reported. On 2 December, the BBC said that Clinton again defended his call for U.S. forces to help enforce the Bosnian settlement. He said that the presidents of Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia "asked us to help implement their peace treaty." -- Patrick Moore

    [3] NATO AGREES TO SEND FORCES TO BOSNIA.

    The NATO Council, at a meeting in Brussels on 1 December, agreed to send a 2,600-strong "enabling" force to Bosnia to prepare for the deployment of the 60,000 troops comprising the NATO implementation force, Western agencies reported. U.S. President Bill Clinton the next day authorized the participation of the 700-strong U.S. contingent. This is the first time that American troops will be deployed in Bosnia. The "enabling" force will prepare headquarters, communications, and transport sites in anticipation of the arrival of the main force, expected to take place after the peace treaty is signed in Paris later this month. -- Michael Mihalka

    [4] POLITICAL SHOWDOWN IN ZAGREB.

    Croatia's seven-party opposition coalition on 2 December elected new officials to the Zagreb City Assembly after deputies from the ruling Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ) and the Croatian Party of Rights had walked out the previous day, international media reported on 4 December. Hina quoted President Franjo Tudjman on 1 December as saying that he "cannot allow Zagreb, whose population constitutes a quarter of the whole of Croatia's, to get a city or county authority that would oppose state policy" and that "all democratic means" will be used to prevent such a scenario. The next day, HDZ members, who hold a third of the city assembly's 50 seats, walked out in an attempt to block an opposition coalition from taking power in Zagreb. Nonetheless, Zdravko Tomac was unanimously elected speaker of the assembly and Goran Granic Zagreb mayor, Novi List reported. Meanwhile, 10,000 Posavina Croats gathered at a protest rally in Zagreb on 2 December to demand an emergency session of the Croatian Assembly over the Dayton accord, the BBC reported on 4 December. -- Daria Sito Sucic

    [5] SERBIAN OPPOSITION PARTY PURGES RANKS.

    BETA on 2 December reported that the Democratic Party (DS) voted to dismiss two prominent members from its ranks. Dragoljub Micunovic, former party president and member of the federal legislature, and Veselin Simonovic, a deputy in the Serbian legislature. DS Vice President Miodrag Perisic explained that "the [party's] main committee considered that through their recent activities, [the two men] had caused political harm to the party." Micunovic responded that the dismissals meant that from now on, the DS is a party "without either a soul or a brain." -- Stan Markotich

    [6] HUNGARIAN OFFICIAL ON ROMANIAN-HUNGARIAN RELATIONS.

    Following a one-week visit to Romania, Laszlo Labody, director of the office in charge of Hungarians living abroad, told a press conference in the Transylvanian city of Cluj that the Romanian education law should be modified. Labody said it was "not normal that street demonstrations by a few thousand students [in Bucharest] could lead to the amendment of the law, whereas the 500,000 signatures gathered from among members of the Hungarian community in a legislative initiative to amend that law are being ignored." Radio Bucharest on 3 December quoted him as saying that Romania and Hungary will certainly reach a historic reconciliation because the Hungarian government's program and Romanian President Ion Iliescu's proposal have the same aim. According to Duna TV Budapest, Labody said the only remaining impediment to concluding the basic treaty between the two countries is the disagreement over the paragraph on national minorities. -- Matyas Szabo

    [7] YELTSIN RESPONDS TO MOLDOVAN PRESIDENT'S LETTER.

    Russian President Boris Yeltsin, responding to a 17 November letter from Mircea Snegur on the Russian State Duma's resolution on the Transdniester (see OMRI Daily Digest, 20 November 1995), stressed that his country's policy toward Moldova has not changed and that Moscow continues to support a political solution to the conflict with the breakaway region. He added that the Transdniester should be granted a "special status" and that "Moldova's independence and territorial integrity" should be preserved. Infotag on 1 December reported that Yeltsin reiterated his readiness to hold a summit meeting with Snegur after an agreement is reached between Chisinau and Tiraspol and that he added such an agreement would also allow for the participation in the summit of the Tiraspol leadership. -- Michael Shafir

    [8] BULGARIAN PARLIAMENT BACKS GOVERNMENT BID FOR EU MEMBERSHIP.

    The Bulgarian National Assembly on 1 December voted to authorize the government to request full EU membership, RFE/RL reported. The motion was approved by a vote of 212 to one. The Bulgarian government the previous day had decided to formally apply for full EU membership. In an address on state-owned TV and radio, Prime Minister Zhan Videnov said EU membership is in the strategic interest of the country. Videnov will submit Bulgaria's application during the EU summit in Madrid in December. Bulgaria has been an associate EU member since February 1995. -- Stefan Krause

    [9] BULGARIA PROTESTS ROMANIAN SEIZURE OF NUCLEAR FUEL.

    Bulgaria on 1 December protested Romania's decision to halt a cargo of nuclear fuel bound for Bulgaria's Kozloduy nuclear plant (see OMRI Daily Digest, 1 December 1995). Reuters cited Yanko Yanev, head of the Atomic Energy Committee, as saying that Romania's action contravenes an international convention. A transport of nuclear waste would have needed permission to transit Romanian waters but "such requirements do not refer to fresh fuel, which is not radioactive," he argued. According to Yanev, such fuel transports have been going on for 20 years. An official at the Romanian port of Cernavoda on 2 December said the two Bulgarian vessels are still being held there. -- Stefan Krause

    [10] INVESTIGATION LAUNCHED INTO HEAD OF BALLI KOMBETAR.

    An investigation has been launched into Abaz Ermenji, chairman of the Balli Kombetar (National Front), Zeri i Popullit reported on 1 December. According to the Prosecutor-General's Office, the National Committee of World War II Veterans has charged Ermenji with committing crimes against humanity between 1941-1945. The former partisans claim that Ermenji was involved in the massacre of 114 innocent citizens in the southern region of Skrapari and the killing of 24 family heads. Ermenji returned to Albania on 21 October 1995 after 49 years in exile and was welcomed by friends and party members of the Balli Kombetar, which was reestablished after 1991. -- Fabian Schmidt

    This material was reprinted with permission of the Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
    For more information on OMRI publications please write to info@omri.cz

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