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Cyprus Mail: News Articles in English, 99-07-25

Cyprus Mail: News Articles in English Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Cyprus Mail at <http://www.cynews.com/>


July 25, 1999

CONTENTS

  • [01] Clerides challenges anti-graft bill
  • [02] Minister attacks public sector workers
  • [03] ‘Aids surgeon still working at clinic’
  • [04] British students remanded on drugs chargesTWO British students arrested on drugs charges on Friday were yesterday remanded in custody for five days each by Famagusta District court.Alastair Mucklow, 20, admitted to the court having a friend post him the drugs. He said they were for personal use.Mucklow and Robert Newman, also 20, both from York, were arrested at around 1pm on Friday, after they collected the package of cannabis from Larnaca Central Post Office. The package, addressed to Mucklow, had arrived at the Pose Office on Monday, and suspicious staff had called in the drugs squad. On examination, it was found to contain a videocassette filled with cannabis resin.The package was resealed and officers waited for Mucklow to collect it, which he and Newman did on Friday, when they were arrested. Their holiday apartment was searched and police found two pipes there believed to have been used to smoke cannabis.The local drugs squad is co-operating with Interpol over the case.
  • [05] Sex attack suspect remanded againA 26-year-old Episkopi villager was yesterday re-remanded in connection with a sex attack on a 50-year-old spinster outside Limassol on the morning of July 15.A Limassol couple found the half-naked and badly beaten victim chained to a water tank outside a remote chapel near Ypsonas some three hours after the attack took place.The victim, from Ypsonas village, was still in intensive care in Limassol hospital yesterday.Renos Agisilaou, arrested the day after the attack, was yesterday remanded in custody for another six days by Limassol District court.The woman’s attacker told her he was a policeman and asked her to lead him to the chapel where he attacked her, police say.
  • [06] Greens declare war on plastic bagsBy Andrew AdamidesTHE CYPRUS Ecological Movement is facing off against one of Greens’ biggest but most unlikely enemies: the humble plastic carrier bag.According to an announcement from the movement yesterday, Cypriots are carrier-bag convenience crazy, resulting in the unprecedented production of 180 million polythene bags a year on the island. They estimate that this costs supermarkets alone approximately £100,000 a year to supply customers with free bags, and describe this as "unprecedented" on an international level.But while the bags may be convenient in the short run, sooner or later millions end up being thrown out, and during their combustion at tips, they give off carcinogenic gasses and other dangerous substances including dioxins. According to the Greens’ figures, an amazing ten per cent of the rubbish in Cyprus’ dumps is made up of these bags.The ecologists also say that as many of the bags are taken to the beach as picnic-wrapping, and are allowed to blow away there, they cause havoc to marine wildlife. Because they degrade so slowly, millions of birds and fish die each year after trying to eat plastic bags.In order to counteract the march of the polythene bag, the Greens have now begun an anti-plastic bag campaign, promoting the use of more natural alternatives. So far, they have kicked off an information campaign for consumers, provided alternative solutions to using polythene bags which include reusable (and stronger, and longer- lasting) cloth bags, are monitoring rubbish levels on the beaches, and are publicising the danger posed to marine life by the bags.
  • [07] All safe as cruise ship hits rocks
  • [08] Beer ad not guaranteed to foster employer confidence

  • [01] Clerides challenges anti-graft bill

    By Martin Hellicar

    PRESIDENT Clerides is challenging a controversial anti-corruption law before the Supreme court, claiming that it contains unconstitutional provisions.

    The law provides for the periodic publication in the government gazette of the full assets of deputies, cabinet members, judges, top ministry officials and owners and editors of all media outlets. The aim of the legislation is to prevent public figures from abusing their position for personal financial gain.

    Clerides has already exercised his right to refer the law back to the House of Representatives. But deputies, mindful of public concern about corruption in high places, approved it anew earlier this month.

    An appeal against the anti-graft law was lodged with the Supreme Court earlier this week.

    The President, basing himself on the advice of Attorney-general Alecos Markides, argues that the law violates the right to privacy and could compromise the independence of judges.

    Many deputies from both sides of the House have already expressed doubts about the constitutional validity of the new law.

    The bill -- which has been on the table for more than a decade -- was first approved on June 10, not long after allegations of unlawful enrichment forced Dinos Michaelides to resign as Interior Minister, bringing the issue of public corruption to the fore.

    July 25, 1999

    [02] Minister attacks public sector workers

    COMMUNICATIONS Minister Leontios Ierodiaconou yesterday hit out at what he described as "overprivileged" public sector workers hell-bent on resisting modernisation.

    The minister's comments were made in reference to a work-to-rule action at Limassol port on Friday, yesterday and today.

    A handful of port workers belonging to the Sylak union are refusing to work overtime in protest at state plans to introduce a shift system at the ailing port.

    During an interview on CyBC radio yesterday, Ierodiaconou spoke of public sector employees who opposed every form of change for the sake of protecting their "privileges".

    Port workers represented by Peo, Sek, Pasydy and Deok backed off from the overtime ban action at the last minute.

    Ierodiaconou said the government was keen to introduce the shift system with the agreement of unions. But if unions would not co-

    operate, then the government would hire more workers to work the shifts, Ierodiaconou warned. Any "extra" workers would then be offered early retirement, he added.

    Local ports have been suffering in the face of competition from other harbours in the region which offer 24-hour service.

    The strike action did not affect the three cruise ships which docked at Limassol harbour yesterday, but cargo vessels dropped anchor outside the harbour to await the resumption of normal service tomorrow. Four cruise vessels are expected at the port today.

    July 25, 1999

    [03] ‘Aids surgeon still working at clinic’

    A TOP Nicosia surgeon has developed Aids and may have exposed patients to the HIV virus on the operating table, it was reported yesterday.

    Reliable sources confirmed to the Cyprus Mailyesterday that a well- respected doctor at a popular private Nicosia clinic had contracted the HIV virus, as reported by Phileleftherosnewspaper.

    The front-page report stated that police had received complaints about the well-known surgeon continuing to practise despite having developed the symptoms of Aids.

    Police spokesman Stelios Neophytou said yesterday that he knew of no such complaint having been made to police.

    A police source said that no action could be taken on such complaints unless there was evidence to suggest a medic had knowingly exposed patients to the HIV virus. A doctor could not be prosecuted simply for being HIV- positive, the police source added.

    The chairman of the Medical Association, Antonis Vassiliou, could not be contacted for comment on the matter yesterday.

    Vassiliou has reportedly contacted the stricken surgeon to warn him about practising his profession. The clinic is reported to be insisting that the HIV-positive doctor has been restricted to purely advisory duties. Three Aids sufferers have been convicted in Cyprus for knowingly exposing their partners to a deadly illness.

    <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;line-height:12.0pt;mso- hyphenate: none"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman";letter-spacing: -.15pt"><o:p> </o:p>

    July 25, 1999

    [04] British students remanded on drugs chargesTWO British students arrested on drugs charges on Friday were yesterday remanded in custody for five days each by Famagusta District court.Alastair Mucklow, 20, admitted to the court having a friend post him the drugs. He said they were for personal use.Mucklow and Robert Newman, also 20, both from York, were arrested at around 1pm on Friday, after they collected the package of cannabis from Larnaca Central Post Office. The package, addressed to Mucklow, had arrived at the Pose Office on Monday, and suspicious staff had called in the drugs squad. On examination, it was found to contain a videocassette filled with cannabis resin.The package was resealed and officers waited for Mucklow to collect it, which he and Newman did on Friday, when they were arrested. Their holiday apartment was searched and police found two pipes there believed to have been used to smoke cannabis.The local drugs squad is co-operating with Interpol over the case.

    July 25, 1999

    [05] Sex attack suspect remanded againA 26-year-old Episkopi villager was yesterday re-remanded in connection with a sex attack on a 50-year-old spinster outside Limassol on the morning of July 15.A Limassol couple found the half-naked and badly beaten victim chained to a water tank outside a remote chapel near Ypsonas some three hours after the attack took place.The victim, from Ypsonas village, was still in intensive care in Limassol hospital yesterday.Renos Agisilaou, arrested the day after the attack, was yesterday remanded in custody for another six days by Limassol District court.The woman’s attacker told her he was a policeman and asked her to lead him to the chapel where he attacked her, police say.

    July 25, 1999

    [06] Greens declare war on plastic bagsBy Andrew AdamidesTHE CYPRUS Ecological Movement is facing off against one of Greens’ biggest but most unlikely enemies: the humble plastic carrier bag.According to an announcement from the movement yesterday, Cypriots are carrier-bag convenience crazy, resulting in the unprecedented production of 180 million polythene bags a year on the island. They estimate that this costs supermarkets alone approximately £100,000 a year to supply customers with free bags, and describe this as "unprecedented" on an international level.But while the bags may be convenient in the short run, sooner or later millions end up being thrown out, and during their combustion at tips, they give off carcinogenic gasses and other dangerous substances including dioxins. According to the Greens’ figures, an amazing ten per cent of the rubbish in Cyprus’ dumps is made up of these bags.The ecologists also say that as many of the bags are taken to the beach as picnic-wrapping, and are allowed to blow away there, they cause havoc to marine wildlife. Because they degrade so slowly, millions of birds and fish die each year after trying to eat plastic bags.In order to counteract the march of the polythene bag, the Greens have now begun an anti-plastic bag campaign, promoting the use of more natural alternatives. So far, they have kicked off an information campaign for consumers, provided alternative solutions to using polythene bags which include reusable (and stronger, and longer- lasting) cloth bags, are monitoring rubbish levels on the beaches, and are publicising the danger posed to marine life by the bags.

    <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;line-height:12.0pt;mso- hyphenate: none"> </o:p>

    July 25, 1999

    [07] All safe as cruise ship hits rocks

    A CYPRUS-FLAGGED cruise ship with 275 passengers on board ran aground on rocks off the Albanian coast early yesterday morning.

    Two other passenger ships, five coastguard vessels and a number of tugs came to the rescue of the Aphrodite II.The 275 passengers were safely transported to nearby Corfu and Igoumenitsa.

    The 50 crew of the Aphrodite IIremained on board to assist with salvage operations.

    The cruise ship was on a course from Brindisi in Italy to Igoumenitsa and Patras when the accident happened.

    July 25, 1999

    [08] Beer ad not guaranteed to foster employer confidence

    By Charlie Charalambous

    AN OUT of the way Cypriot village coffeeshop is not the usual stuff of international lager ad campaigns but poor Bambos Iosifakis wishes he had been pictured drinking something else.

    Bambos has unwittingly become an unlikely ad-man's dream with his face plastered across the UK seemingly endorsing the amber brew from Oz, Foster's lager.

    The fact that he and his mum did not consent to the picture being used by top UK ad firm M.& C. Saatchi, or even knew of its existence, was not a problem.

    The real red-faced scandal is that Bambos is employed by local drinks giant Keo whose motto "Be happy and drink well" may well be stretched to the limit if they get wind of the ad splashed all over the British press.

    "It looks bad if my boss sees it: I could be in big trouble," the 35-year- old told The Sunday Mailfrom his Limassol home.

    Keo likes to pride itself on the quality and popularity of its beer, so there is no way Bambos would be seen dead drinking a pint of anything else.

    Thanks to modern technology, however, his picture has been doctored to plant the Australian lager in the hand of the Cypriot.

    "I wasn't even drinking anything when the picture was taken," said Bambos.

    Although he does not remember who took the picture, he believes it may have been taken last year by a tourist who stumbled across the quaint Malia village coffeeshop.

    "The next thing I know a child comes running up to me saying an Englishman has seen my photo in the papers," said Bambos.

    "I was completely surprised when they brought it (the ad in the Daily Telegraph) to me. I don't know how it got there," he added.

    His mother Adriane is also "confused" as to why a "poor Cypriot woman with many children" would be the subject of Foster's ‘Those Who Drink Australian Think Australian’ glossy hard sell.

    © Copyright Cyprus Mail 1999

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