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Cyprus Mail: News Articles in English, 99-09-12

Cyprus Mail: News Articles in English Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Cyprus Mail at <http://www.cynews.com/>


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September 12 1999

CONTENTS

  • [01] Investor sues stock exchange for potential loss of profits
  • [02] Scandals erode confidence in the churchBy Staff ReportersBECAUSE of recent scandals public confidence in the church has plummeted -- but the police seem to have regained some respect.Research carried out by Cyprus College indicates that the Cyprus Orthodox Church is no longer among our most cherished institutions, and has suffered a sudden fall from grace.In 1997 the church came out best in a similar Cyprus College poll, but now it has fallen to sixth (out of eight) spot of the island's major institutions.Now only 45 per cent (this figure is even lower among the 18- 24 age group) of those polled believe the church performs its function as an institution, compared with 78 per cent two years ago.As the church has slid down the morality scale the police's estimation in the eyes of the public has soared, with 66 per cent of the population now placing more trust in the force than 51 per cent in 1997. This may be partly due to increased efforts to eradicate organised crime.But the biggest rise of all is in the public's support for local government, with 70 per cent (up from 49 per cent) of the population believing district administrations are efficiently run. For the district of Nicosia this figure is even higher, which might be attributed to the ‘Lellos factor’ (the popularity of Nicosia Mayor Lellos Demetriades).Surprisingly, at the summit of public satisfaction and popularity come the private TV stations, with a whopping 77 per cent believing that they do a first class job.Needless to say, down in the bargain basement of Cypriot disillusionment are the state hospitals and the civil service.A lowly four out of ten people believe the hospitals are run properly, but in Nicosia this figure drops to three in ten.Civil servants remain glued to the bottom of the ‘trust league’, with just 32 per cent giving them a slim vote of confidence.On an ironic high note, however, six out of ten civil servants believe that the public sector delivers the goods.
  • [03] Floor show takes to the streetsBy Martin HellicarLIMASSOL cabaret owners are threatening to take to the streets, with their hired artistes in tow, to protest against a government clampdown on their businesses.A ministerial committee has decided that the number of foreign women allowed to work at cabarets -- which are basically glorified strip joints -- should be drastically reduced. The committee also wants to impose a 3.30am closing time on the clubs and a moratorium on licences for new cabarets.None of this goes down well with the cabaret owners, who are rumoured to be planning a march through Limassol's notorious Heroes’ Square -- where most of their establishments are -- today.But yesterday police said they had received no official notification of any such protest from club owners.Club bosses are said to be planning to get their dancing girls to attend in an atempt to swell the numbers for the protest.The Limassol Association of Cabaret Owners has already lodged an appeal with the Supreme Court to halt the government measures, claiming the state would be liable for the loss of earnings they would suffer should the restrictions come into force. They argue that huge sums have been invested in cabarets and in the need to secure licences for foreign girls.If the number of available permits is reduced the owners say they will either go out of business or suffer crippling losses, and will therefore seek substantial compensation.Threats by owners of establishments largely blamed for the rising tide of organised crime on the island are unlikely to make much headway with a government determined to stamp out the white slave trade.The police have made it a priority to clamp down hard on drugs, gambling and prostitution rackets closely associated with the cabaret scene in Limassol.After the latest of many suspected gangland hits in Heroes' Square earlier this month, local authorities vowed, for the umpteenth time, to ‘clean up’ the infamous area. A police station on site, increased street lighting and stepped-up police patrols are all in the pipeline in an effort to rid the square of its reputation.
  • [04] National Council puts off decision on membershipTHE NATIONAL Council yesterday put off a decision on whether to admit leaders of non- parliamentary parties to its midst.The contentious issue was on the agenda for yesterday's meeting of President Clerides's Cyprus problem think-tank, but discussions focused instead on his forthcoming trip to Athens and New York."In view of President Glafcos Clerides' departure to Athens and to address the UN General Assembly in New York, political parties were informed on latest developments on the Cyprus problem and exchanged views," Government Spokesman Michalis Papapetrou said after the three-hour meeting. Clerides leaves for Athens tomorrow.National Council members Disy, Diko, Akel, Edek and the United Democrats had agreed to wait until they had arrived at their own individual positions on participation of non- parliamentary parties before making a final decision, Papapetrou said.As a concession to non-parliamentary parties wanting to sit on the council, Clerides is to meet with the New Horizons, Adik, Eurodemocratic Renewal, Epalxi and the Green party tomorrow to inform them about the latest Cyprus problem developments.New Horizons leader Nicos Koutsou has already made it plain he will not attend Mondays's meeting, in protest at his party being barred from the National Council after having attended for more than a year.Clerides will meet Greek Prime Minister Costas Simitis in Athens on Tuesday. He arrives in New York on September 16 and is scheduled to address the UN General Assembly on September 23. Clerides is expected to have a meeting with UN Secretary-general Kofi Annan during his stay in New York. He returns to Cyprus on the last day of the month.His trip to New York comes at a time when Annan is expected to call the two sides in Cyprus to resume settlement talks. The peace talks have been stalled for two years, and prospects look bleak, with Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash insisting on recognition for his self-declared state before he sits down at the negotiating table with Clerides.
  • [05] ‘UK urged to lift arms embargo’THE government is trying to persuade Britain to lift its arms embargo in order to acquire spare parts for an essential weapons system.Britain is refusing to allow a UK arms manufacturer to send an essential spare part for a state-of-the-art system it sold the National Guard, according to newspaper reports.There is a problem with the electrical component of the weapon system which needs to be replaced immediately.But Britain is said to be insisting on its embargo on military spare parts to Cyprus imposed to persuade the government not to purchase the Russian S-300 missiles.Although other countries like France have lifted similar sanctions since the S-300 deal was scrapped last December, the UK is sticking to its stance.The government is reportedly looking at ways to apply pressure on Britain to change its mind or seek alternative options.Seeking a legal way out, which would force the British manufacturer to meet its contractual obligations for technical support and maintenance, has not been ruled out.
  • [06] Attack suspect surrenders
  • [07] Terry Waite back in CyprusFORMER Beirut hostage Terry Waite is back in Cyprus eight years since he passed through RAF Akrotiri after his release in November 1991.Waite was taken hostage on January 20, 1987 on a visit to Beirut while he was trying to negotiate the release of Western captives in Lebanon. The Anglican envoy spent nearly five years as a prisoner of Islamic extremists until he was finally set free on November 18, 1991.Waite will preach at the Battle of Britain commemorative church service at Akrotiri this morning.He also gave a lecture yesterday on the psychological trauma of his captivity as part of the British Bases education programme.The former adviser to the Archbishop of Canterbury will leave the island tomorrow.

  • [01] Investor sues stock exchange for potential loss of profits

    By Martin Hellicar

    A LOCAL investor is suing the Cyprus Stock Exchange over its decision to shut up shop for three weeks.

    Christoforos Potamitis claims the closure of the market from September 3 to September 24 will cost him thousands of pounds in profit he could have made buying and selling shares.

    He is taking his grievance to the Supreme Court in what could prove to be a test-case for the future function of the burgeoning market.

    The stock exchange closed its doors in order to give brokerages a chance to process the thousands of share transactions carried out over the past few weeks by a share-crazy public. This is not the first time the market has become the victim of its own popularity in this way.

    Many investors blame poor organisation for the backlog of unprocessed transactions.

    Potamitis is among these detractors, claiming that the market was forced into closure by inept organisation and management.

    He will argue before the court that the market closure denies him his constitutional right to use his property. He also claims that by closing the market down for 15 working days, the Cyprus Stock exchange neglected its duty to allow free trade in stocks and shares.

    The plaintiff charges the stock exchange with taking an arbitrary and illegal action.

    The stock market position is that the law allows for the closure of the exchange in emergency situations.

    The market has been breaking all records recently, with share values going through the roof and transaction volumes rocketing. Many observers have warned that shares are over-valued and called for the market to be reigned in.

    A:hover {color: #FF0000; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold}

    September 12 1999

    [02] Scandals erode confidence in the churchBy Staff ReportersBECAUSE of recent scandals public confidence in the church has plummeted -- but the police seem to have regained some respect.Research carried out by Cyprus College indicates that the Cyprus Orthodox Church is no longer among our most cherished institutions, and has suffered a sudden fall from grace.In 1997 the church came out best in a similar Cyprus College poll, but now it has fallen to sixth (out of eight) spot of the island's major institutions.Now only 45 per cent (this figure is even lower among the 18- 24 age group) of those polled believe the church performs its function as an institution, compared with 78 per cent two years ago.As the church has slid down the morality scale the police's estimation in the eyes of the public has soared, with 66 per cent of the population now placing more trust in the force than 51 per cent in 1997. This may be partly due to increased efforts to eradicate organised crime.But the biggest rise of all is in the public's support for local government, with 70 per cent (up from 49 per cent) of the population believing district administrations are efficiently run. For the district of Nicosia this figure is even higher, which might be attributed to the ‘Lellos factor’ (the popularity of Nicosia Mayor Lellos Demetriades).Surprisingly, at the summit of public satisfaction and popularity come the private TV stations, with a whopping 77 per cent believing that they do a first class job.Needless to say, down in the bargain basement of Cypriot disillusionment are the state hospitals and the civil service.A lowly four out of ten people believe the hospitals are run properly, but in Nicosia this figure drops to three in ten.Civil servants remain glued to the bottom of the ‘trust league’, with just 32 per cent giving them a slim vote of confidence.On an ironic high note, however, six out of ten civil servants believe that the public sector delivers the goods.

    A:hover {color: #FF0000; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold}

    September 12 1999

    [03] Floor show takes to the streetsBy Martin HellicarLIMASSOL cabaret owners are threatening to take to the streets, with their hired artistes in tow, to protest against a government clampdown on their businesses.A ministerial committee has decided that the number of foreign women allowed to work at cabarets -- which are basically glorified strip joints -- should be drastically reduced. The committee also wants to impose a 3.30am closing time on the clubs and a moratorium on licences for new cabarets.None of this goes down well with the cabaret owners, who are rumoured to be planning a march through Limassol's notorious Heroes’ Square -- where most of their establishments are -- today.But yesterday police said they had received no official notification of any such protest from club owners.Club bosses are said to be planning to get their dancing girls to attend in an atempt to swell the numbers for the protest.The Limassol Association of Cabaret Owners has already lodged an appeal with the Supreme Court to halt the government measures, claiming the state would be liable for the loss of earnings they would suffer should the restrictions come into force. They argue that huge sums have been invested in cabarets and in the need to secure licences for foreign girls.If the number of available permits is reduced the owners say they will either go out of business or suffer crippling losses, and will therefore seek substantial compensation.Threats by owners of establishments largely blamed for the rising tide of organised crime on the island are unlikely to make much headway with a government determined to stamp out the white slave trade.The police have made it a priority to clamp down hard on drugs, gambling and prostitution rackets closely associated with the cabaret scene in Limassol.After the latest of many suspected gangland hits in Heroes' Square earlier this month, local authorities vowed, for the umpteenth time, to ‘clean up’ the infamous area. A police station on site, increased street lighting and stepped-up police patrols are all in the pipeline in an effort to rid the square of its reputation.

    <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;line-height:12.0pt;mso- hyphenate: none">

    A:hover {color: #FF0000; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold}

    September 12 1999

    [04] National Council puts off decision on membershipTHE NATIONAL Council yesterday put off a decision on whether to admit leaders of non- parliamentary parties to its midst.The contentious issue was on the agenda for yesterday's meeting of President Clerides's Cyprus problem think-tank, but discussions focused instead on his forthcoming trip to Athens and New York."In view of President Glafcos Clerides' departure to Athens and to address the UN General Assembly in New York, political parties were informed on latest developments on the Cyprus problem and exchanged views," Government Spokesman Michalis Papapetrou said after the three-hour meeting. Clerides leaves for Athens tomorrow.National Council members Disy, Diko, Akel, Edek and the United Democrats had agreed to wait until they had arrived at their own individual positions on participation of non- parliamentary parties before making a final decision, Papapetrou said.As a concession to non-parliamentary parties wanting to sit on the council, Clerides is to meet with the New Horizons, Adik, Eurodemocratic Renewal, Epalxi and the Green party tomorrow to inform them about the latest Cyprus problem developments.New Horizons leader Nicos Koutsou has already made it plain he will not attend Mondays's meeting, in protest at his party being barred from the National Council after having attended for more than a year.Clerides will meet Greek Prime Minister Costas Simitis in Athens on Tuesday. He arrives in New York on September 16 and is scheduled to address the UN General Assembly on September 23. Clerides is expected to have a meeting with UN Secretary-general Kofi Annan during his stay in New York. He returns to Cyprus on the last day of the month.His trip to New York comes at a time when Annan is expected to call the two sides in Cyprus to resume settlement talks. The peace talks have been stalled for two years, and prospects look bleak, with Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash insisting on recognition for his self-declared state before he sits down at the negotiating table with Clerides.

    A:hover {color: #FF0000; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold}

    September 12 1999

    [05] ‘UK urged to lift arms embargo’THE government is trying to persuade Britain to lift its arms embargo in order to acquire spare parts for an essential weapons system.Britain is refusing to allow a UK arms manufacturer to send an essential spare part for a state-of-the-art system it sold the National Guard, according to newspaper reports.There is a problem with the electrical component of the weapon system which needs to be replaced immediately.But Britain is said to be insisting on its embargo on military spare parts to Cyprus imposed to persuade the government not to purchase the Russian S-300 missiles.Although other countries like France have lifted similar sanctions since the S-300 deal was scrapped last December, the UK is sticking to its stance.The government is reportedly looking at ways to apply pressure on Britain to change its mind or seek alternative options.Seeking a legal way out, which would force the British manufacturer to meet its contractual obligations for technical support and maintenance, has not been ruled out.

    A:hover {color: #FF0000; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold}

    September 12 1999

    [06] Attack suspect surrenders

    A FOURTH suspect in the rocket attack on a Limassol cabaret was remanded for eight days yesterday after giving himself up.

    Pavlos Hadjicostas, 27, from Limassol, ended a four-day police search for him when he turned up at Ayia Napa police station and turned himself in.

    Hadjicostas was later taken to court and remanded in police custody for eight days in connection with last Sunday's attempted murder of 44-year-old cabaret owner Sotiris Athinis outside the Blue Pearl club in Heroes’ Square.

    A:hover {color: #FF0000; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold}

    September 12 1999

    [07] Terry Waite back in CyprusFORMER Beirut hostage Terry Waite is back in Cyprus eight years since he passed through RAF Akrotiri after his release in November 1991.Waite was taken hostage on January 20, 1987 on a visit to Beirut while he was trying to negotiate the release of Western captives in Lebanon. The Anglican envoy spent nearly five years as a prisoner of Islamic extremists until he was finally set free on November 18, 1991.Waite will preach at the Battle of Britain commemorative church service at Akrotiri this morning.He also gave a lecture yesterday on the psychological trauma of his captivity as part of the British Bases education programme.The former adviser to the Archbishop of Canterbury will leave the island tomorrow.

    © Copyright Cyprus Mail 1999

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