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Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation: News in English, 03-08-27

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation: News in English Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation at <http://www.cybc.com.cy/>

CONTENTS

  • [01] Headlines lunch
  • [02] Turks citizenship
  • [03] Mideast Arafat
  • [04] Iraq wrap
  • [05] Korea talks
  • [06] Fire arrest
  • [07] Akanthou excavations
  • [08] Stampede India
  • [09] Mars tonight
  • [10] Tailer
  • [11] Weather lunch Wednesday 27/08/2003

  • [01] Headlines lunch

    The issue of giving illegal citizenship of the pseudostate in the occupied territories to Turkish settlers, has taken on a new twist, according to reports in the Turkish cypriot press,

    U.S. soldiers continued hunting Saddam Hussein loyalists in remote hideouts north of Baghdad, as President George W. Bush vowed America would not retreat from Iraq in the face of a guerrilla insurgency,

    The Turks are now claiming that the first settlers in Cyprus came from the region of Anatolia in Turkey

    AND

    When the chefs who cater to royalty and heads of state hold their annual summit, it is the gastronomic equivalent of the United Nations.

    [02] Turks citizenship

    The issue of giving illegal citizenship of the pseudostate in the occupied territories to Turkish settlers, has taken on a new twist, according to reports in the Turkish cypriot press. According to daily Kibris, the illegal supreme court of administrative differences, following an appeal by the Turkish republican party, has decided that the names of all those who received the illegal citizenship from June 2002, until today should be released. The paper published the names of 224 who received the illegal citizenship, among them, well known Turkish businessmen.

    [03] Mideast Arafat

    Palestinian President Yasser Arafat said he was ready to take action against militant groups if Israel halted missile strikes and other attacks designed to crush them.

    A crackdown on militants behind suicide bombings would help put a U.S. peace "road map" on track. But, echoing concerns that have dissuaded Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas from cracking down, Arafat said he would not risk a civil war.

    Arafat, largely confined to his Ramallah base since late 2001, said he had ordered the arrests of militant leaders before in the nearly three-year-old uprising for an independent Palestinian state and that he was ready to do so again.

    Arafat has been frozen out of peacemaking. The United States and Israel accuse him of inciting violence, a charge he denies.

    He spoke after Israel carried out its third military strike against the militant Islamic group Hamas in the Gaza Strip.

    [04] Iraq wrap

    U.S. soldiers continued hunting Saddam Hussein loyalists in remote hideouts north of Baghdad, as President George W. Bush vowed America would not retreat from Iraq in the face of a guerrilla insurgency.

    Thousands of troops from the 4th Infantry Division, based in Saddam's hometown of Tikrit, have launched a new operation to root out resistance in hostile Sunni Muslim territory to the north of Baghdad.

    Operation Ivy Needle began yesterday with the capture of 24 people in raids targeting a criminal gang.

    According to new figures issued by the Pentagon, 62 U.S. soldiers have been killed in action in Iraq since Bush declared major combat over on May 1, and a further 78 have died from accidents, illness or non-hostile incidents.

    The postwar U.S. death toll in Iraq exceeded 138 -- the number of U.S. soldiers who died during the invasion and occupation of Iraq in March and April.

    But Bush said efforts to secure Iraq would continue.

    [05] Korea talks

    China urged restraint from all six countries at the start of talks to end North Korea's nuclear programme as Pyongyang seized the chance to stress its core demand for a U.S. security guarantee.

    Diplomats from the two Koreas, the United States, Japan, Russia and host China took their places at an enormous hexagonal table for the three days of closed-door talks at the exclusive Diaoyutai State Guest House in western Beijing.

    The talks are seen as the first in a series of tough rounds of negotiation, with even agreement to meet again likely to be hailed as a sign of success.

    The United States, which says Pyongyang may already have one or two nuclear weapons, will be looking initially for a commitment that isolated Pyongyang will scrap its programme. North Korea wants security guarantees before dismantling.

    The United States has branded North Korea part of an "axis of evil" along with pre-war Iraq and Iran, but all sides toned down their shrill rhetoric as they outlined their positions.

    [06] Fire arrest

    Police have arrested a 46 year old man in connection with the torching of a house in Episkopi. The fire broke out just before eleven last night, in a house, property of Tuekish cypriot services, in which Chrystalla Polydorou resides with her three children. The blaze rapidly spread to four nearby houses and the offices of the Turkish cypriot services, completely torching them.

    [07] Akanthou excavations

    The Turks are now claiming that the first settlers in Cyprus came from the region of Anatolia in Turkey. Mugke Sevketoglou, an archaelogist of the so called Eastern Mediterranean University in the occupied territories, that is heading an excavations team in the occupied Nicosia district village of Akanthou, claimed that findings lead to the conclusion that the first settlers came from Anatolia ten thousand years ago. The excavations started in 1996, with the participation of 30 arheaeologists and students from 7 countries.

    [08] Stampede India

    In India, at least 24 people died when tens of thousands of Hindu pilgrims stampeded at a major religious festival in Western India.

    Dozens have been injured.

    No further details were available, but an estimated six million were attending the festival.

    [09] Mars tonight

    The last time Mars came this close to Earth, our ancestors were living in caves and struggling to make basic tools out of rocks.

    A... mere 60 thousand years later, thousands of people around the world will use a vast array of high-tech digital and optical equipment to observe the "red planet" as it passes.

    From the Polynesian shores of Tahiti to outback Australia and Japan amateur and professional stargazers began aiming their telescopes towards the eastern sky for a close encounter with Mars.

    At 0951 GMT Mars will pass just 55.76 million km or 34.65 million miles close to Earth, making it the closest encounter between the two planets since the Stone Age.

    The last time Mars came nearer was around September 12 in 57,617 B.C.

    If you miss it this time you'll have to wait 284 years for another such close encounter.

    The U.S.-based Planetary Society has declared August 27 "Mars Day". Its Web site (http://planetary.org/marswatch2003) details global events from official viewings from observatories in Sydney and Beijing to desert star parties in places like Jordan.

    Some of the best viewing will be in the southern hemisphere, especially from isolated tiny South Pacific islands like Tahiti, thought to be the closest point on Earth to Mars, and outback Australia, where a lack of pollution from city lights means Mars will shine bright red in the night sky.

    [10] Tailer

    When the chefs who cater to royalty and heads of state hold their annual summit, it is the gastronomic equivalent of the United Nations.

    The Club des Chefs des Chefs, one of the most exclusive clubs in the world, is meeting in Paris this week to swap tips and perhaps do its bit for international relations.

    The motto of the club is that if politics divide men, good food brings them together.

    Only chefs to kings, queens or heads of state are allowed in the group founded in 1977, which now counts 40 members including the chief cooks for Britain's Queen Elizabeth, U.S. President George W. Bush and the Sultan of Brunei.

    Wearing stiff pleated toques and white jackets embroidered with state symbols, the 25 members reunited in Paris were a congenial but tight-lipped bunch. Their job combines the discretion of a majordomo with the finesse of an ambassador.

    Once a year, the tables are turned and the chefs are wined and dined like kings.

    [11] Weather lunch

    It will be mainly fine this afternoon, with local cloud forming in some areas. Winds will be moderate westerly to southwesterly, force three to four, turning strong force four to five in windward areas, over slight to moderate seas. Temperatures will rise to 36 degrees inland, 33 on the south coast, 31 on the west coast and 27 on the mountains. Tonight it will be mainly fine. Winds will gradually turn southwesterly to northwesterly, force two to three over slight seas. Temperatures will drop to 20 degrees inland, 21 on the coasts and 17 on the mountains. The fire hazard is extremely high in all forest areas.
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