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Voice of America, 00-06-01

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] YUGO SHOOTING (L-ONLY) BY IRENA GUZELOVA (BELGRADE)
  • [02] CLINTON - EUROPE BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)
  • [03] CLINTON - GERMANY (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (BERLIN)
  • [04] LUXEMBOURG HOSTAGES (L) BY DOUG BAKSHIAN (LUXEMBOURG)
  • [05] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)
  • [06] THURSDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] YUGO SHOOTING (L-ONLY) BY IRENA GUZELOVA (BELGRADE)

    DATE=6/1/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-263054
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The national security advisor to the president of Montenegro has been shot to death outside his home in the capital, Podgorica. Irena Guzelova reports from Belgrade.

    TEXT: The victim, Goran Zugic, was one of the most trusted advisors to Montenegrin President Milo Djukanovic. He was killed when an unknown assailant fired two bullets into his head late Wednesday evening. Police immediately sealed off the area and began searching for suspects. The circumstances surrounding the murder are similar to a number of unsolved assassinations of public figures in Belgrade. However, it is the first incident of its kind in Montenegro, the smaller of the two Yugoslav republics. The shooting comes just 10 days before crucial local elections, which are being seen as a possible indictor of the republic's shifting political mood. The elections will be held in the coastal town of Herceg Novi and the capital, Podgorica, on June 11th. Montenegrins fear the killing may be an attempt by authorities in Belgrade to spread instability into the small republic. Mr. Zugic was known to have handled sensitive information and was keen to calm tensions between Serbia and Montenegro -- which has taken a series of unilateral moves to distance itself from Belgrade. Earlier in May, Montenegrin police and the Yugoslav army staged joint military exercises to show tensions had eased. In December, there was a tense stand-off between the police and army at Montenegro's main airport. But many Montenegrins fear that authorities in Belgrade may begin to stir-up tensions ahead of the elections. They are concerned that the authorities in Serbia are trying to drive a wedge between Montenegro's south, where the majority support Mr. Djukanovic's pro-Western government, and republic's north, where Belgrade can count on the support of the pro-Serb party, knows as the S-N-P. The campaign leading up to the local elections has become increasingly bitter. The S-N-P has joined forces with the ruling parties in Serbia. It accuses the Montenegrin police force of recruiting foreign mercenaries. The Montenegrin government accuses the S-N-P of trying to build a greater Serbia and of trying to destabilize the republic. (Signed) NEB/IG/JWH/ENE/JP 01-Jun-2000 11:08 AM EDT (01-Jun-2000 1508 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [02] CLINTON - EUROPE BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=6/1/2000
    TYPE=U-S OPINION ROUNDUP
    NUMBER=6-11849
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=

    INTRO: President Clinton is on the final scheduled trip of his presidency to Europe. He is meeting with leaders on trade and other issues, including the Middle East peace process. On Saturday and Sunday, Mr. Clinton meets Russia's new president Vladimir Putin in Moscow, for a discussion of a pending U-S plan to build an anti-missile defense system, which Russia and the Europeans vigorously oppose. The trip is already generating editorial comment, and we welcome ___________ now with a sampling in today's U-S Opinion Roundup.

    TEXT: To get an idea of what the president faces in his discussions on both trade and the proposed anti- missile defense system, one needs only to look at Thursday's Rocky Mountain News in Denver. There, foreign affairs columnist Holger Jensen calls the president's trip "Mission Impossible." He suggests that discussions on trade in bananas, U-S beef, and European jetliners represent intractable differences on both sides. And several papers suggest that Europe fears that the anti-missile defense system will cause all previous nuclear reduction treaties to come unglued. We begin our sampling in California, where The Los Angeles Times has some serious misgivings about the proposed anti-missile defense system.

    VOICE: President Clinton can expect to have a hard time convincing Russia that the national Missile Defense system the United States is thinking about building poses no threat to Russian security, and he has also found deep doubts about the project among America's closest allies. Meeting with European Union leaders as he makes his way toward Moscow and weekend talks with President Vladimir ... Putin, [Mr.] Clinton has heard the same concerns voiced that the C-I- A is reportedly going to raise in an intelligence estimate being prepared for the president. The main concern is that rather than strengthening national security, N-M-D could instead prove to be a destabilizing factor, encouraging nuclear proliferation and igniting a costly new arms race. ///OPT /// Even [President] Clinton's proposal to share antimissile technology with other `civilized nations" - - assuming that the technology can be shown to work - - is unlikely to ease doubts about its security value. /// OPT /// ... The potential threat does not present an urgency or magnitude to justify a problematical 60-billion- dollar investment or the destabilizing strategic consequences of thrusting ahead.

    TEXT: In the Midwest, the Chicago Tribune has some advice for President Clinton on another important topic, the emerging, independent military alliance, known as Euroforce, another of the topics on the week's agenda.

    VOICE: President Clinton seems to be enjoying his victory lap through Europe this week ... Pundits in Portugal heaped praise on his stewardship of the U-S relationship with Europe ... [and] on Friday in Germany, [Mr.] Clinton is to be awarded the International Charlemagne Prize, given annually to someone who has fostered European unity. ... What has been harder for the Clinton administration to do is treat Europe like a grownup, not a dependent child. For years, American officials have complained that Europe wasn't shouldering its fair share of the burden of defending itself and keeping peace in its own backyard. ... But now that the European Union is moving ahead with plans to create a Euro Army of 60-thousand troops by ... 2003 ... the Clinton administration has gotten worried that such developments might undermine NATO or weaken U-S influence on the continent. That is a ridiculous notion. ... At the end of the day, America and Europe share the same values and interests ...promoting freedom and democracy in a peaceful, prosperous Europe.

    TEXT: As regards the president's specific missions of attempting to resolve trade issues, and reassure Russian president Vladimir Putin about the anti- missile defense system the U-S is contemplating, Holger Jensen of Denver's Rocky Mountain News is pessimistic. He says the president's job:

    VOICE: ... appears to be mission impossible. Although trans-Atlantic trade reached 320- billion dollars last year, each side continues to accuse the other of protectionism. And both are correct. ... [Mr.] Clinton's hardest sell will be missile defense, not only to the Russians but to our European allies. Europe fears it will unravel the web of arms control agreements between the United States and Russia ... Intelligence officials have already warned the White House that deployment could spark an arms race between China, Pakistan and India ... Russia's reaction has been equally blunt: "No" to N-M-D [Nuclear Missile Defense] and "no" to any changes in the A-B-M [Anti Ballistic Missile] Treaty. ... he can expect no softening in his summit with president Vladimir Putin.

    TEXT: The Kansas City [Missouri] Star, discussing the president's planned meeting in Moscow with Mr. Putin, dismisses Russia's opposition to the plan.

    VOICE: ... the United States does not need Russian approval to decide whether or not to defend itself. [Mr.] Clinton's job will be to convince his counterpart that Russia, too, has much to fear from weapons proliferation, and that supplying rogue nations with nuclear expertise and material would put Russia's access to Western aid and markets at risk. ... But [Russian President] Putin is opposed, and no agreement is expected. That may be just as well. This is a major decision and a new U-S president will take office next January. ... certainly it would be better if Moscow understood that in concept, missile defenses are not threatening. But the United States does not need Russian approval to decide whether or not to defend itself.

    TEXT: Here in the nation's capital, however, The Washington Post is urging the president to "meddle in Russian Affairs."

    VOICE: Mr. Clinton should stress the importance of religious and press freedom, toward which Mr. Putin has adopted a cavalier attitude. With Mr. Putin talking about firing elected governors and subordinating them to appointed viceroys with secret-police and military connections, Mr. Clinton should reaffirm the value of electoral democracy. He should welcome economic reforms such as Mr. Putin's proposed tax simplification but stress that no reforms will succeed if unaccompanied by an independent judiciary, shareholder rights, contract enforcement and other signs of respect for law. ... Democracy has not failed in Russia; it is incomplete.

    TEXT: On that note we conclude this sampling of U-S editorial comment on President Clinton's current trip to Europe. NEB/ANG/gm 01-Jun-2000 16:19 PM LOC (01-Jun-2000 2019 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [03] CLINTON - GERMANY (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (BERLIN)

    DATE=6/1/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-263067
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT: Intro: German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has expressed his country's concerns to President Clinton about U-S plans for a limited missile defense system. The two leaders discussed the issue in a meeting in Berlin shortly after Mr. Clinton arrived in Germany from Portugal. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports. Text: The Germans have made no secret of their unease about a proposed U-S missile shield. Mr. Clinton wants to amend the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty to allow for deployment of such a system, arguing it would protect the United States against attack by what Washington calls rogue states, such as Iran or North Korea. But Chancellor Schroeder fears the move would undermine past arms control efforts. He spoke to reporters through a translator.

    // Schroeder actuality //

    We have to be very careful that any such project does not retrigger the process of renewed arms race.

    // end act //

    U-S National Security Advisor Sandy Berger denied there was a sharp disagreement between the two leaders. He said MR. Clinton made clear he is seeking Europe's support, but that ultimately he would make a decision based in terms of U-S national security. That decision is expected later this year. Russian President Vladimir Putin shares Chancellor Schroeder's concerns about the proposed missile defense and will make his views known when MR. Clinton begins a two-day summit in Moscow beginning Saturday. National Security Advisor Berger says the President will make clear to Mr. Putin that if he decides to go forward with the missile shield, he would want to do so in the context of arms control.

    // Berger actuality //

    This will not be presented as an ultimatum, it will be presented as a set of issues that the Russians have to make their own judgments about in terms of how they see their interests. Is it better for them for this to proceed in the context of a modified ABM treaty, or run the risk that this President or a subsequent President might build this system or a larger system outside the context of an ABM treaty.

    // end act //

    Mr. Berger was referring to a proposal by presumed Republican Presidential nominee Texas Governor George W-Bush, who announced last month that if elected, he would pursue a much larger missile defense system - even if it meant abandoning the ABM treaty, which would prohibit such a plan. (signed)
    NEB/DAT/PT 01-Jun-2000 18:30 PM EDT (01-Jun-2000 2230 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] LUXEMBOURG HOSTAGES (L) BY DOUG BAKSHIAN (LUXEMBOURG)

    DATE=6/1/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-263066
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A hostage situation at a day-care center in eastern Luxembourg has ended with all the hostages -- 25 children and three adults -- safe and unharmed. Police stormed the building, and shot and critically wounded a gunman who had been holding the hostages since Wednesday. V-O-A's Douglas Bakshian reports from Luxembourg.

    TEXT: A feeling of relief settled over the eastern town of Wasserbillig as authorities brought the 28- hour ordeal to an end. The young children were reunited with their parents, and psychological support from counselors was made available to all. The gunman was armed with a pistol, hand grenades and other weapons. Authorities also say he had gasoline with him. He was an ethnic Tunisian, described as having a history of psychiatric problems. He had been separated from his own children after losing a custody battle in 1994, and one of his children apparently attended the day-care center a few years ago. The gunman was asking for a plane to take him to Libya. Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker said police were forced to move in when the man announced he intended to flee in a car with three hostages. Authorities tricked the gunman into thinking he was about to be interviewed on television. When he came out of the day-care center - still holding one child - he was lured to a spot where police could take a clear shot at him. Interior Minister Michel Wolter told reporters nothing like this had ever happened in Luxembourg before, although his forces are trained for such situations. The minister said a raid is always risky, but things went well.

    // OPT //

    Mr. Wolter says the authorities were carrying on a difficult dialogue with the gunman, but they never intended to allow him to leave the day-care center, which would mean losing control of the situation. // END OPT // Earlier Thursday, the gunman released several children. A police spokeswoman said authorities saw a possible opening (at around 7:30) in the evening, and police took action.

    // OPT //

    Luxembourg Television reported that two weeks prior to the incident the gunman telephoned a local radio station and told a reporter how miserable he was because he could not see his children. Asked why he had called the station, the man replied he just wanted people to know how difficult his situation was. Even though the gunman was known to authorities, officials say they had had no trouble with him since (1994, when) he lost the custody battle for his children. The ethnic Tunisian had Luxembourg nationality; authorities say he had been in this country since 1982. // END OPT // Violent crimes are rare in Luxembourg (which lies between Belgium, Germany and France) and the hostage standoff has shocked this normally quiet corner of Europe. (Signed)
    NEB/DAB/WTW 01-Jun-2000 18:40 PM EDT (01-Jun-2000 2240 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)

    DATE=6/1/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-263064
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: U-S stock prices closed higher today (Thursday), with the market getting strong support from the technology sector. Analysts say the psychology on Wall Street was good with the release of market-friendly economic data that eased interest rate jitters (nerves). V-O-A correspondent Elaine Johanson reports from New York:

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average went up over one-percent, closing 130 points higher at 10-thousand- 651. The Standard and Poor's 500 index gained 28 points - two percent. The technology-weighted Nasdaq composite gained over five percent. The technology components of the Dow Jones helped drive the Industrials up. Even Microsoft shares traded higher, after a leading analyst said the software giant's bad publicity should be behind it soon. A federal court ruling on a breakup of the company is expected next week. Many analysts believe Microsoft has a good chance of winning on appeal. The latest on the U-S economy shows the manufacturing sector slowed down in May and spending on new building projects has eased. Due out on Friday is the May jobs report - considered especially important for inflation-watchers.

    /// REST OPT FOR LONG VERSION ///

    Analyst David Magee expects the U-S stock market to remain volatile while the U-S central bank keeps its eyes on the inflation numbers. At the same time, he believes the inflation that is causing this volatility is temporary and the market will likely resume normal activity in another month or two:

    /// MAGEE ACT ///

    Once the economy begins to decelerate, which is what we expect in the second half of this year, we'll find there is more calmness about the interest rate environment and we'll get back to what the stock market normally does, and that is discount earnings prospects and growth rates. And so, I'm very bullish (optimistic) about the market longer term, but I think we have a little more of this volatility ahead.

    /// END ACT ///

    In other news, leading automaker General Motors has reported overall vehicle sales were down by five- point-eight percent in May. This comes on the heels of a just slightly-better-than-anticipated report from number-two automaker Ford. Ford sales were up one- point-four percent. Analysts believe rising interest rates are impacting the auto market. Meanwhile, U-S retailers gave a mixed picture for the month of May. Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, reported sales were up over seven-percent. Sears, Roebuck and Co. said its sales were up three and one- half percent. But number-three retailer K-Mart and number-four Target had disappointing results. Again, analysts point to concern over higher interest rates. Consumers may still feel prosperous and confident, but they appear to be spending more cautiously. (Signed) NEB/NY/EJ/LSF/ENE/gm 01-Jun-2000 16:58 PM LOC (01-Jun-2000 2058 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [06] THURSDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=6/1/2000
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-11848
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: President Clinton's European trip, the last of his presidency, is coming in for a good deal of editorial attention in Thursday's U-S press. So too is Chechnya, one of the topics he may discuss with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, later in the week. Other popular topics continue to be the peace progress in Northern Ireland and the highly controversial election results in Peru. There are also comments on the Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon, the potentially positive fallout from the Elian Gonzalez case and the Midwest U-S city of Detroit braces for demonstrations against the Organization of American States meeting coming soon to its Canadian twin city, Windsor, Ontario. Now, here with a closer look and an excerpt or two is __________ and today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: The Chicago Tribune has some advice for President Clinton regarding the emerging, independent military alliance, known as Euroforce.

    VOICE: /// OPT /// President Clinton seems to be enjoying his victory lap through Europe this week ... Pundits in Portugal heaped praise on his stewardship of the U-S relationship with Europe ... [and] on Friday in Germany, [Mr.] Clinton is to be awarded the International Charlemagne Prize, given annually to someone who has fostered European unity. ... What has been harder for the Clinton administration to do is treat Europe like a grownup, not a dependent child. /// END OPT /// For years, American officials have complained that Europe wasn't shouldering its fair share of the burden of defending itself and keeping peace in its own backyard. ... But now that the European Union is moving ahead with plans to create a Euro Army of 60-thousand troops by ...2003... the Clinton administration has gotten worried that such developments might undermine NATO or weaken U-S influence on the continent. That is a ridiculous notion. ... At the end of the day, America and Europe share the same values and interests ...promoting freedom and democracy in a peaceful, prosperous Europe.

    TEXT: Now, as regards the president's specific missions of attempting to resolve some trade issues, and reassuring Russian president Vladimir Putin about the anti-missile defense system the U-S is contemplating, Holger Jensen of Denver's Rocky Mountain News is pessimistic.

    VOICE: ... it appears to be mission impossible. Although trans-Atlantic trade reached 320- billion dollars last year, each side continues to accuse the other of protectionism. And both are correct. ... [Mr.] Clinton's hardest sell will be missile defense, not only to the Russians but to our European allies. Europe fears it will unravel the web of arms control agreements between the United States and Russia ... Intelligence officials have already warned the White House that deployment could spark an arms race between China, Pakistan and India ... Russia's reaction has been equally blunt: "No" to N-M-D [Nuclear Missile Defense] and "no" to any changes in the A-B-M [Anti Ballistic Missile] Treaty. ... he (Clinton) can expect no softening in his summit with President Vladimir Putin.

    TEXT: Another view on the issue now from today's Kansas City [Missouri] Star:

    VOICE: ... the United States does not need Russian approval to decide whether or not to defend itself.

    TEXT: And in Baltimore, The Sun notes a related topic, Chechnya, where it says, things are going badly for the Russians. After mentioning heavy Russian casualties, the inability of Moscow to find reliable Chechen allies, and the oil-rich Caspian Sea basin, near which the war rages, the Sun concludes:

    VOICE: The Kremlin is right to insist that Chechnya is part of Russia. But a lasting peace can be achieved only by addressing the longstanding grievances of the strong-willed Chechens and granting them a far-reaching governmental autonomy.

    TEXT: Brighter news from Northern Ireland, where the local governing assembly is back in business, having had power transferred from the parliament in London. Unionists and Republicans are giving peace another try, and California's San Jose Mercury News is one of several U-S dailies cautiously optimistic:

    VOICE: The Northern Ireland Assembly is scheduled to convene for the first time in four months, but within the hall the enemies of peace will be lying in wait, looking for their opportunity to bring the stumbling peace process to a halt yet again. Hard-line Protestants ... who never supported the 1998 peace accords that led to limited self-rule, see an opportunity to undermine the leadership of First Minister David Trimble.

    /// BEGIN OPT ///

    TEXT: The Mercury News goes on to worry about the struggle in reforming the regional police, the pro- Unionist Royal Ulster Constabulary, and how Catholics fear the changes will only be superficial. In Cleveland, Ohio, The Plain Dealer adds:

    VOICE: Irish nationalists and British loyalists alike must keep the peace process on track. The I-R-A must cooperate fully with the arms inspectors. Nationalists should not indulge in such questionable and provocative ploys as banning the British flag from display on public buildings. And Unionists should make a stronger effort to embrace the spirit of police reform ...

    /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: From Ireland, where progress toward peace moves forward, albeit slowly, to Peru, where a highly controversial, one-candidate election last Sunday, re- electing two-time incumbent Alberto Fujimori, threatens the peace. This excerpt is from today's [Pittsburgh] Post-Gazette:

    VOICE: ... President ... Fujimori made an ill- advised bet on Sunday. He wagered that he could prevail in a sham election and get away with [it]. It is now up to the United States and the Organization of American States to show Mr. Fujimori just how poor a bet it was, lest others be tempted to follow his example.

    /// OPT ///

    TEXT: Out in the U-S Pacific Ocean state of Hawaii, Honolulu's Star-Bulletin suggested the following in Wednesday's afternoon editions:

    VOICE: Sanctions are needed to protest [the] Peru vote. ... The United States should impose sanctions to back up its protest. In addition, Washington could block loans from the World Bank and [the] Inter-American Development Bank. Some of these programs should be cut.

    /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: To the Middle East now, and the reshuffling of the balance of power in the wake of Israel's military withdrawal from Southern Lebanon. Ohio's Akron Beacon Journal wonders as "Israel retreats toward peace ... Will others?"

    VOICE: /// OPT /// The evacuation may have been free of bloodshed, but Israel and Lebanon have paid dearly the past two decades in the millions of dollars in damage and the thousands killed and injured in continuous conflict, among them Lebanese civilians, Israeli and Lebanese soldiers and U-N peace keepers, including 241 U- S Marines killed when their barracks were bombed.... With Israel out of Lebanon, the focal point of this volatile period becomes the sincerity of Syrian President Hafez Assad in pursuing peace with Israel and stability in the region. /// END OPT /// ... Israel has gambled that the best prospect for a more secure existence is to remove itself from Lebanon. It will take statesmanship from the many power brokers in the region for that gamble to pay off in peace and stability.

    /// OPT ///

    TEXT: The St. Louis [Missouri] Post Dispatch is also watching developments there closely:

    VOICE: If Lebanon is no longer a proxy battleground, it is still a pawn. Though the Israelis are gone, Lebanon is not independent of Syria or in control of its own territory ...

    TEXT: Turning to hemisphere developments, the national daily USA Today, published in a Washington suburb, says the saga of the shipwrecked Cuban boy, Elian Gonzalez, still being decided in U-S courts, has had a beneficial effect in similar cases.

    VOICE: ... the circus that convened around ... Elian Gonzalez is beginning to yield results. Among other things, it has elevated the problem of international child abductions to the level of talks today in Berlin between President Clinton and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder. Germany is ... among the Hague Convention's leading scofflaws. The [Hague Convention] treaty states that custody disputes should be settled in the child's country of permanent residence. Yet the German judiciary is notorious for allowing abducted children to stay even when the law says they should be returned. ... As the Clinton visit demonstrates, the priority of reuniting abducted children with their left-behind parents cannot be too high.

    TEXT: Still with this hemisphere's doings, Detroit, Michigan, and its sister city across the border, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, are bracing for demonstrations in a few days, aimed at disrupting a meeting of the Organization of American States [O-A-S] which will be held in the Canadian city. Says The Detroit News:

    VOICE: A group called the Coalition to Stop the O-A-S wants the organization to protest American jobs while conditioning trade among member nations on expanding rights for workers, stepping up protection for the environment and promoting great concern for human rights. Law enforcement agencies on both sides of the border are taking precautions against unruly demonstrations which may include blocking access to the Ambassador Bridge or the Windsor Tunnel.

    TEXT: The Detroit Free Press says the demonstrators are confused.

    VOICE: The first thing the demonstrators will display is their ignorance. Then will come the placards, graffiti, marches, speeches and who knows what else in a misguided effort to disrupt the meeting ... Protests ... appear to be rooted in the same thinking that spawned the awful mess that ruined last year's World Trade Organization conference in Seattle. ... Trade isn't even on the agenda ...

    TEXT: And lastly, several newspapers are taking note of what The San Francisco Chronicle is calling: "The Battle of the Bulge," the ever expanding problem of U- S obesity.

    VOICE: a two day White House conference on nutrition this week has revealed to no one's surprise that the United States is suffering from a national fat attack. It is estimated that 55 percent of the adult population is overweight, half of them so fat ... they are at risk for heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer and strokes. ... The U-S Department of Agriculture says only 12 percent of Americans eat a properly balanced diet. ... But government can only do so much. Good nutrition begins at home. Parents must be made aware of the health hazards of obesity and to feed their children wisely.

    TEXT: On that dietary note, we complete this "light snack" of editorials from Thursday's U-S press.
    NEB/ANG/JBM/JP 01-Jun-2000 11:40 AM EDT (01-Jun-2000 1540 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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